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Health promotion. Social marketing
Health promotion: marketing sociale, comunicazione, salute, ambiente, disuguaglianze sociali.
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Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Pharma Communication & Social Media
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Social media use among patients and caregivers: a scoping review - Hamm et al. - BMJ Open

Social media use among patients and caregivers: a scoping review - Hamm et al. - BMJ Open | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

Article summary
Article focus

The use of social media in healthcare has been widely advocated, but there is little evidence describing the current state of the science and whether or not these tools can be used to benefit patient populations.

We mapped the state of the existing literature evaluating the use of social media in patient and caregiver populations.

Key messages

There is an extensive and rapidly growing body of literature available investigating the use of social media in patient and caregiver populations.

Most studies have been descriptive; however, with such widespread use, evaluations of effectiveness are needed.

In studies that have examined effectiveness, positive conclusions are often reported, despite the non-significant findings.

Strengths and limitations of this study

Our search was comprehensive and we included an extensive body of literature, across conditions, populations and study designs.

Social media is constantly evolving, leading to challenges in keeping the search updated.

A more in-depth analysis is needed on specific topics, conditions and populations to guide the use and implementation of social media interventions.


Via rob halkes, Dinesh Chindarkar
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rob halkes's curator insight, July 23, 3:32 AM

Good to see the impact of socical media in health care reviewed.
What maybe "non-sginificant" to reserach in statistic perspective, might not be the same as relevance in view of personal meaning ! ;-)

Still a lot to go, specifcally in the direction of impact on personal satisfaction, behaviour and health outcomes.. (see the discussion paragraph)


Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Social Health on line
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The case about health apps by @IMSHealth

The case about health apps by @IMSHealth | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it

The case about health apps by IMS, stated in 4 infographics, regarding patient empowerment, health information needs etc.

 

@IMSHealth is using Ow.ly! View all of this user's images and documents.


Via rob halkes
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rob halkes's curator insight, November 8, 2013 4:10 AM

The case about health apps figuring growing need for health information, the need to accommodate one's ability to do some about one's proper health condition and to get support for that.
This need will ask for registering one's health relevant data, sharing information and get tailored help. It is just the latter one, that demands changes in the delivery of health care. The question for future efficiency of this developing trend is how to match both medical and patients' demands to such processes: the third perspective on the very process.

It is my experience that such can best be done in the framework of developing ehealth.

Amber Morgan's curator insight, November 8, 2013 4:53 AM

Technology in health care

Rescooped by Giuseppe Fattori from Social Business in Health
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Definition of Health 2.0 and Medicine 2.0: A Systematic Review

Definition of Health 2.0 and Medicine 2.0: A Systematic Review | Health promotion. Social marketing | Scoop.it
Definition of Health 2.0 and Medicine 2.0: A Systematic Review

ABSTRACT

Background: During the last decade, the Internet has become increasingly popular and is now an important part of our daily life. When new “Web 2.0” technologies are used in health care, the terms “Health 2.0" or "Medicine 2.0” may be used.
Objective: The objective was to identify unique definitions of Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0 and recurrent topics within the definitions.
Methods: A systematic literature review of electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL) and gray literature on the Internet using the search engines Google, Bing, and Yahoo was performed to find unique definitions of Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0. We assessed all literature, extracted unique definitions, and selected recurrent topics by using the constant comparison method.
Results: We found a total of 1937 articles, 533 in scientific databases and 1404 in the gray literature. We selected 46 unique definitions for further analysis and identified 7 main topics.
Conclusions: Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0 are still developing areas. Many articles concerning this subject were found, primarily on the Internet. However, there is still no general consensus regarding the definition of Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0. We hope that this study will contribute to building the concept of Health 2.0/Medicine 2.0 and facilitate discussion and further research.

(J Med Internet Res 2010;12(2):e18)


During the last decade, the Internet has become increasingly popular and now forms an important part of our daily life [1]. In the Netherlands, the Internet is even more popular than traditional media like television, radio, and newspapers [2]. Furthermore, the impact of the Internet and other technological developments on health care is expected to increase [3,4]. Patients are using search engines like Google and Bing to find health related information. In Google, five percent of all searches are health related [5]. Patients can express their feelings on weblogs and online forums [3], and patients and professionals can use the Internet to improve communication and the sharing of information on websites such as Curetogether [6] and the Dutch website, Artsennet [7] for medical professionals. The use of Internet or Web technology in health care is called eHealth [1,8].

In 2004 the term “Web 2.0” was introduced. O’Reilly defined Web 2.0 as “a set of economic, social, and technology trends that collectively form the basis for the next generation of the Internet, a more mature, distinctive medium characterized by user participation, openness, and network effects” [9]. Although there are different definitions, most have several aspects in common. Hansen defined Web 2.0 as “a term which refers to improved communication and collaboration between people via social networking” [10]. According to both definitions, the main difference between Web 1.0 (the first generation of the Internet) and Web 2.0 is interaction [11]. Web 1.0 was mostly unidirectional, whereas Web 2.0 allows the user to add information or content to the Web, thus creating interaction. This is why the amount of “user-generated content” has increased enormously [12]. Practical examples of user-generated content are online communities where users can participate and share content. Examples are YouTube, Flickr, Facebook, and microblogging such as Twitter. Twitter, for example, improves communication and the sharing of information among health care professionals [13]....


Via rob halkes
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