Social marketing, behaviour and social change
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Behavioral Economics: "Nudging" Underserved Populations to be Screened for Cancer

Abstract

Persistent disparities in cancer screening by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status require innovative prevention tools and techniques. Behavioral economics provides tools to potentially reduce disparities by informing strategies and systems to increase prevention of breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers. With an emphasis on the predictable, but sometimes flawed, mental shortcuts (heuristics) people use to make decisions, behavioral economics offers insights that practitioners can use to enhance evidence-based cancer screening interventions that rely on judgments about the probability of developing and detecting cancer, decisions about competing screening options, and the optimal presentation of complex choices (choice architecture). In the area of judgment, we describe ways practitioners can use the availability and representativeness of heuristics and the tendency toward unrealistic optimism to increase perceptions of risk and highlight benefits of screening. We describe how several behavioral economic principles involved in decision-making can influence screening attitudes, including how framing and context effects can be manipulated to highlight personally salient features of cancer screening tests. Finally, we offer suggestions about ways practitioners can apply principles related to choice architecture to health care systems in which cancer screening takes place. These recommendations include the use of incentives to increase screening, introduction of default options, appropriate feedback throughout the decision-making and behavior completion process, and clear presentation of complex choices, particularly in the context of colorectal cancer screening. We conclude by noting gaps in knowledge and propose future research questions to guide this promising area of research and practice.


Via Giuseppe Fattori
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Evaluating Fear Appeal Messages in Tweets about the Tips Campaign

Evaluating Fear Appeal Messages in Tweets about the Tips Campaign | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it

In March 2012, the CDC launched “Tips from Former Smokers,” a $54 million national campaign featuring individuals experiencing long-term health consequences of smoking. The campaign approach was based on strong evidence that anti-tobacco ads portraying fear, graphic images, and personal testimonials are associated with attitudinal and behavior change. Yet it was also controversial; critics cited the danger that viewers might reject such intensely graphic messages. Tasked with informing this debate, our study analyzes the corpus of Tips campaign-related tweets obtained via the Twitter Firehose. We provide a novel and rigorous method for media campaign evaluation within the framework of the Extended Parallel Process Model. Among the relevant Tweets, 87% showed evidence of message acceptance, while 7% exhibited message rejection.


Via Giuseppe Fattori
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E-Cig Stigma: California Declares Vaping a Public Health Risk

E-Cig Stigma: California Declares Vaping a Public Health Risk | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
E-cigarettes represent a rising public-health risk that threaten to unravel progress made on tobacco by "re-normalizing smoking behavior" and lurin...
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Reducing occupational sedentary time: a systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence on activity-permissive workstations - Neuhaus - 2014 - Obesity Reviews

Reducing occupational sedentary time: a systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence on activity-permissive workstations - Neuhaus - 2014 - Obesity Reviews | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it

Summary

Excessive sedentary time is detrimentally linked to obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. Studies have been investigating the use of activity-permissive workstations to reduce sedentary time in office workers, a highly sedentary target group. This review systematically summarizes the evidence for activity-permissive workstations on sedentary time, health-risk biomarkers, work performance and feasibility indicators in office workplaces. In July 2013, a literature search identified 38 relevant peer-reviewed publications. Key findings were independently extracted by two researchers. The average intervention effect on sedentary time was calculated via meta-analysis. In total, 984 participants across 19 field-based trials and 19 laboratory investigations were included, with sample sizes ranging fromn = 2 to 66 per study. Sedentary time, health-risk biomarkers and work performance indicators were reported in 13, 23 and 23 studies, respectively. The pooled effect size from the meta-analysis was −77 min of sedentary time/8-h workday (95% confidence interval = −120, −35 min). Non-significant changes were reported for most health- and work-related outcomes. Studies with acceptability measures reported predominantly positive feedback. Findings suggest that activity-permissive workstations can be effective to reduce occupational sedentary time, without compromising work performance. Larger and longer-term randomized-controlled trials are needed to understand the sustainability of the sedentary time reductions and their longer-term impacts on health- and work-related outcomes.


Via Giuseppe Fattori
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Time for change—additional daylight saving could improve public health - Medical Xpress

Time for change—additional daylight saving could improve public health - Medical Xpress | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
Having later sunsets may lead to an increase in children's physical activity, according to research by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the University of Bristol.
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Lessons from Ebola - Trust: the Necessary Public Health Tool - Huffington Post

Lessons from Ebola - Trust: the Necessary Public Health Tool - Huffington Post | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
Without trust, public health efforts will fall short. Building trust during on on-going epidemic response is challenging, especially when mistakes may be made....
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Health in hand: mobile technology and the future of healthcare - PLoS Blogs (blog)

Health in hand: mobile technology and the future of healthcare - PLoS Blogs (blog) | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
Wi-Fi, smartphones, and all associated phenomena have permeated lives all around the globe. We are just seeing the first generation of humans to grow up wi
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MIT Creates A New Map A Day To Inspire Social Change

MIT Creates A New Map A Day To Inspire Social Change | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
Mapping everything from urban greenery to independent coffee shops, the "You Are Here" project aims to build a whopping 10,000 city maps in... (MIT creates a new map a day to inspire social change.
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Smartwatches will revolutionise treatment for chronic conditions

Smartwatches will revolutionise treatment for chronic conditions | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
Google, Apple, and Samsung are racing to develop wearable technology that could be used to monitor and track personal health and diagnose disease, explains Chris Duffey (Smartwatches will revolutionise treatment for chronic conditions but will it...
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Study launched into whether social media data can reveal drug safety issues - Out-Law.com

Study launched into whether social media data can reveal drug safety issues - Out-Law.com | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
In-PharmaTechnologist.com
Study launched into whether social media data can reveal drug safety issues
Out-Law.com
Study launched into whether social media data can reveal drug safety issues. A new study has been launched to determine ...
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Epigenetics: genes, environment and the generation game

Epigenetics: genes, environment and the generation game | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
New research claims that environmental factors can affect the genes of our offspring. Diabetes, obesity – even certain phobias – may be influenced by our forebears.
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Sibling bullying increases depression risk - BBC News

Sibling bullying increases depression risk - BBC News | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
BBC News
Sibling bullying increases depression risk
BBC News
"We need to change the conversation we have about this. If it occurred in a school setting ... before the problem escalates.
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The Health Consequences Of Driving To Work Each Day

The Health Consequences Of Driving To Work Each Day | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
Driving to work everyday could put your health in harm in more ways than one.
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Ethical Challenges of Big Data in Public Health

Ethical Challenges of Big Data in Public Health | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it

Digital epidemiology, also referred to as digital disease detection (DDD), is motivated by the same objectives as traditional epidemiology. However, DDD focuses on electronic data sources that emerged with the advent of information technology [1–3]. It draws on developments such as the widespread availability of Internet access, the explosive growth in mobile devices, and online sharing platforms, which constantly generate vast amounts of data containing health-related information, even though they are not always collected with public health as an objective. Furthermore, this novel approach builds on the idea that information relevant to public health is now increasingly generated directly by the population through their use of online services, without their necessarily having engaged with the health care system [4, 5]. By utilizing global real-time data, DDD promises accelerated disease outbreak detection, and examples of this enhanced timeliness in detection have already been reported in the literature. The most recent example is the 2014 Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa [6]. Reports of the emerging outbreak were detected by digital surveillance channels in advance of official reports. Furthermore, information gleaned by the various datasets can be used for several epidemiological purposes beyond early detection of disease outbreaks [7, 8], such as the assessment of health behavior and attitudes [4] and pharmacovigilance [9].

This is a nascent field that is developing rapidly [10]. While changes in the ways in which epidemiologic information is obtained, analyzed, and disseminated are likely to result in great social benefits, it is important to recognize and anticipate potential risks and unintended consequences. In this article we identify some of the key ethical challenges associated with DDD activities and outline a framework for addressing them. We argue that it is important to engage with these questions while the field is at an early stage of evolution in order to make ethical awareness integral to its development.

  
Via Giuseppe Fattori
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A Formative Evaluation of a Social Media Campaign to Reduce Adolescent Dating Violence

A Formative Evaluation of a Social Media Campaign to Reduce Adolescent Dating Violence | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it

Background: The Emory Jane Fonda Center implemented the Start Strong Atlanta social marketing campaign, “Keep It Strong ATL”, in 2007 to promote the development of healthy adolescent relationships and to foster the prevention of adolescent dating abuse among 11-14 year olds.

Objective: A formative evaluation was conducted to understand whether messages directed at the target audience were relevant to the program’s relationship promotion and violence prevention goals, and whether the “Web 2.0” social media channels of communication (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, Tumblr, and Pinterest) were reaching the intended audience.

Methods: Mixed methodologies included qualitative interviews and a key informant focus group, a cross-sectional survey, and web analytics. Qualitative data were analyzed using constant comparative methodology informed by grounded theory. Descriptive statistics were generated from survey data, and web analytics provided user information and traffic patterns.

Results: Results indicated that the Keep It Strong ATL social marketing campaign was a valuable community resource that had potential for broader scope and greater reach. The evaluation team learned the importance of reaching adolescents through Web 2.0 platforms, and the need for message dissemination via peers. Survey results indicated that Facebook (ranked 6.5 out of 8) was the highest rated social media outlet overall, and exhibited greatest appeal and most frequent visits, yet analytics revealed that only 3.5% of “likes” were from the target audience. These results indicate that the social media campaign is reaching predominantly women (76.5% of viewership) who are outside of the target age range of 11-14 years.

Conclusions: While the social media campaign was successfully launched, the findings indicate the need for a more focused selection of communication channels, timing of media updates to maximize visibility, balancing message tone and delivery, and incorporating differentiated messaging for the target audiences. Collaboration with parents and community partners is also emphasized in order to expand the campaign’s reach and create more channels to disseminate relationship promotion and dating violence prevention messaging to the intended audience.


Via Giuseppe Fattori
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Game Changers: How game mechanics and social media motivate healthy change

Game Changers: How game mechanics and social media motivate healthy change | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
Rewards and incentives play a critical role in motivating healthy behavior change. And a growing number of clinical trials show that games and social media can change health behavior and improve o...

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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Ten things we learnt about behaviour change and sustainability

Ten things we learnt about behaviour change and sustainability | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
How do we create new habits for the good of the planet? Catch up on highlights from our expert-led debate with readers
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Twitter Can Be Useful Tool for Public Health Organizations -- but Must Be ... - Newswise (press release)

Twitter Can Be Useful Tool for Public Health Organizations -- but Must Be ... - Newswise (press release) | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
Social media marketing strategies present both challenges and opportunities for public health professionals. It’s an effective way of reaching large audiences, but social media can also be used to spread misinformation.
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Wind power is cheapest energy, EU analysis finds - The Guardian

Wind power is cheapest energy, EU analysis finds - The Guardian | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
Onshore windfarms far cheaper than coal and gas when health impacts are factored in, report shows
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One-Third of Food Is Lost or Wasted: What Can Be Done

One-Third of Food Is Lost or Wasted: What Can Be Done | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
From our farms to grocery stores to dinner tables, one-third of the food we grow is lost or wasted. We can do better.
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Games for Change Uses Video Games for Social Projects

Games for Change Uses Video Games for Social Projects | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
The Games for Change Festival, in partnership with the Tribeca Film Festival for the first time, seeks to use video games to bring about social change. (Minecraft for #socialgood ~ Play on @G4C!
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Consumer behaviour and sustainability - what you need to know

Consumer behaviour and sustainability - what you need to know | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
Our live chat explored what value consumers place on the sustainability of the products they buy.
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Study: Less than a third of popular health apps have privacy policies - mobihealthnews

Study: Less than a third of popular health apps have privacy policies - mobihealthnews | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
Study: Less than a third of popular health apps have privacy policies mobihealthnews According to a new study from Boston Children's Hospital and the University of Cologne in Germany, less than a third of health apps in the iTunes and Google Play...
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International Literacy Day 2014 - “Literacy and Sustainable Development”

International Literacy Day 2014 - “Literacy and Sustainable Development” | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it

Literacy and Sustainable Development

The theme of International Literacy Day 2014 is “Literacy and Sustainable Development”.  Literacy is one of the key elements needed to promote sustainable development, as it empowers people so that they can make the right decisions in the areas of economic growth, social development and environmental integration. Literacy is a basis for lifelong learning and plays a crucial foundational role in the creation of sustainable, prosperous and peaceful societies. 

Literacy skills developed from a basic to advanced level throughout life are part of broader competencies required for critical thinking, the sense of responsibility, participatory governance, sustainable consumption and lifestyles, ecological behaviours, biodiversity protection, poverty reduction, and disaster risk reduction.  

This year’s International Literacy Day will be celebrated worldwide. A main global celebration will take place in Dhaka, where the Government of Bangladesh in cooperation with UNESCO will organize the International Conference on “Girls’ and women’s literacy and education: Foundations for sustainable development and the awarding of UNESCO Literacy Prizes” in support for the UN Secretary General’s Global Education First Initiative (GEFI).

  Literacy is a key lever of change and a practical tool of empowerment on each of the three main pillars of sustainable development: economic development, social development and environmental protection.    

Former UN Secretary-General, Kofi Annan



POSTER 2014 

- See more at: http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/prizes-and-celebrations/celebrations/international-days/literacy-day/#sthash.LHVpc3LF.dpuf


Via Charles Tiayon
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Virtual Reality Could Help Teach Sustainable Habits, Change Long Term Behavior - Huffington Post

Virtual Reality Could Help Teach Sustainable Habits, Change Long Term Behavior - Huffington Post | Social marketing, behaviour and social change | Scoop.it
Virtual Reality Could Help Teach Sustainable Habits, Change Long Term Behavior Huffington Post When she leaves this forest, and re-enters the "real" world, her paper consumption will drop by 20 percent and she will show a measurable preference for...
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