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Free Technology for Teachers: 26 Ways to Use Comics in the Classroom and 5 Free Tools for Creating Comics

Free Technology for Teachers: 26 Ways to Use Comics in the Classroom and 5 Free Tools for Creating Comics | Social Learning | Scoop.it
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New breed of student information systems is emerging | eSchool News

The market for student information systems is undergoing tremendous change in the wake of several recent ed-tech mergers and acquisitions—and this trend has important implications for school software.
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Rescooped by Krisha Kerr from STEM and STEAM
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Creating Learning Spaces for a New Age of Discovery

Creating Learning Spaces for a New Age of Discovery | Social Learning | Scoop.it
School environments should fulfill a student's need to feel engaged intellectually and emotionally in the learning process, Jim Childress writes.

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Laura Graceffa's curator insight, May 31, 2013 11:38 AM

Spaces for learning--- like the MS learning commons

Rescooped by Krisha Kerr from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Education Rethink: Why Professional Development Should Be More Like Edcamp

Education Rethink: Why Professional Development Should Be More Like Edcamp | Social Learning | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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A Principal's Reflections: Social Media Use Needs to Focus More on Learning Than Behavior

A Principal's Reflections: Social Media Use Needs to Focus More on Learning Than Behavior | Social Learning | Scoop.it

"It pains me when I hear about school districts that are attempting to implement and impose social media policies that focus more on the "behavior" of educators as opposed to student learning.  Last week I was fortunate to weigh in on one such district's journey in this area and share my thoughts on where the emphasis should be. The video clip of the interview can be found below. "


Via John Evans
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Read and reflect.

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Philip Darbyshire's curator insight, June 6, 2013 10:15 AM

Interesting thoughts from a teacher

Rescooped by Krisha Kerr from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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What Do Parents Think About Mobile Learning? | Edutopia.org

What Do Parents Think About Mobile Learning? | Edutopia.org | Social Learning | Scoop.it

 

Mobile devices are coming to school.The Learning First Alliance (where I am deputy director) and Grunwald Associates, with support from AT&T, recently released Living and Learning with Mobile Devices, which examines parents' attitudes towards mobile devices as learning tools.

 

This survey, completed by parents of children age 3 to 18, found that 51 percent of high school students carry a smartphone with them to school every day -- so do 28 percent of middle school students and 8 percent of elementary school students.

 

Many in the education community recognize the transformative power of these types of devices, which have the potential to increase student engagement, allow educators to more easily personalize learning experiences, and provide students quick access to an enormous amount of information.

 

But are schools using mobile devices for learning?

 

In many cases, no. While 17 percent of parents say that their child's school requires use of a portable or mobile device, in many cases it is a school-provided portable computer. And 72 percent of parents report that their child's school does not allow use of family-owned mobile devices.

 

There are a number of legitimate concerns related to the use of mobile technology, particularly student/family-owned devices, in school. Two often cited are issues of equity and the potential for distraction. But given the ubiquity of mobile technology in daily life, the fact that kids are often told to power down at school reflects a disconnect that raises the issue of whether we are appropriately and adequately preparing students for life in the digital age.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Nishtha's curator insight, June 11, 2013 10:40 AM

Indeed, very interesting, especially for brands who are targeting parents & kids. Mobile is way beyond advertising and mobile devices can be a great way to offer utility - learning, personalised learning & inviting feedback. Though yes, brands need to be mindful of not creating one themselves if the long term vision & commitment is not there and rather partner with an existing/upcoming one. 

Bryan Kay's curator insight, October 22, 2015 8:31 PM

I hope this article provides insight on how to confront student and parental issues as an educational leader.

 

Mobile learning should be embraced. Any way we can improve home-school conection the better.

 

Most parents and families have smart phones or access to internet. We should utilize this as a way to connect to parents more.

Rescooped by Krisha Kerr from :: The 4th Era ::
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Beyond Badges: Why Gamify? | Edutopia

Beyond Badges: Why Gamify? | Edutopia | Social Learning | Scoop.it

By Matthew Farber

 

"Mashable defines gamification as "applying game thinking or even game mechanics into a non-game context. " Game mechanics in the "real world"include earning badges, completing missions and leveling up. Non-game companies, like Amazon, Deloitte and Salesforce.com, gamify to increase customer engagement. Gamification puts the customer on a journey motivated by intrinsic, or personally meaningful, rewards. An example is earning a "mayorship" badge on the mobile application Foursquare by "checking in" regularly to the same location.

 

"Gamification in the classroom has many benefits, too. After all, engaging a student intrinsically in the learning process, rather than with extrinsic motivators like grades, is the goal of every teacher. Awarding badges for academic accomplishments is a method to gamify the education. Global Kids, Inc. notes that badges "support learners to give language to and value what they are learning, by offering names for their new competencies and providing a venue that recognizes their importance."

 

"As a teacher, I assumed that game design had more to do with coding than the study of human behavior. To truly understand gamification, I realized that I needed to understand the process of game design. In gaming terms, I decided to go on a quest."


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A Nice Graphic On The Risks of Social Networking ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

A Nice Graphic On The Risks of Social Networking ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Social Learning | Scoop.it

"The infographic below features some of the risks of posting on social networks. It also provides some interesting data on the kind of content people share on these sites. Check it out below and share it with your colleagues and students."


Via John Evans
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A good graphic for cyber citizenship and safety.

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How to spur more technology use in the classroom | eSchool News

Superintendents and educational technology directors discussed how to ensure that technology is integrated into the curriculum during a Dec. 7 webinar sponsored by the Consortium for School Networking.
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Edmodo: A free, secure social networking site for schools | eSchool News

Teachers seeking online communication and collaboration opportunities with students and other educators have another free resource at their disposal: Edmodo, an education-based social networking site.
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Rescooped by Krisha Kerr from Engagement Based Teaching and Learning
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EdCamp

Edcamp is free, democratic, participant-driven professional development for K-12 educators worldwide. Edcamps are: • free • non-commercial and conducted with...

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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, January 10, 2013 11:15 PM

Rethinking professional learning.  

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The Five Fingers to Social Media Learning

The Five Fingers to Social Media Learning | Social Learning | Scoop.it
5 Finger Social Media Learning We all know how important Social Media is and we all know that it HAS to be a part of your blog or business marketing game plan. What I want to talk about is people trying to over complicate social media.

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Using E-Portfolios in the Classroom | Edutopia

Using E-Portfolios in the Classroom | Edutopia | Social Learning | Scoop.it
Edutopia blogger Mary Beth Hertz walks you through a helpful checklist to determine which e-portfolio would best suit your needs.

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Rapid Instructional Design for Accelerated Learning | Social ...

Rapid Instructional Design for Accelerated Learning | Social ... | Social Learning | Scoop.it
The Accelerated Learning Rapid Instructional Design (RID) model is based on the concept that people learn more from experience with feedback than training materials. See on www.dashe.com ...
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Rescooped by Krisha Kerr from :: The 4th Era ::
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Video Games and Social Emotional Learning

Video Games and Social Emotional Learning | Social Learning | Scoop.it

by Jackie Gerstein

 

"For their paper, “Mirrored Morality: An Exploration of Moral Choice in Video Games,” Dr. Weaver and his fellow researcher Nicky Lewis had 75 gamers (40 men, 35 women, ages 18 to 24) play Fallout 3, a game that starts with relatively little game play and multiple character-building decisions. These gamers also took the Moral Foundations Questionnaire (you can take the self-scorable test, here) to evaluate their psychological foundations of morality, such as whether they value loyalty to a group or whether they respect authority. From this, Weaver determined that players used their own moral foundation to make their choices in-game. The key finding was players largely made moral decisions just as they would in real life, that is, they were doing the right thing. Even when given the opportunity to be violent, they were choosing non-violent "acts.http://www.forbes.com/sites/carolpinchefsky/2012/11/28/you-and-your-videogame-avatar-are-more-moral-than-you-realize/


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 14, 2013 8:54 AM

The infographic part way through is interesting and eye-opening.

GamerPeer's curator insight, June 14, 2013 1:23 PM

And my parents always worried that I didn't learn anything playing video games.