Social Health
128 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by rhalper from Health Care Social Media
Scoop.it!

Pharma Corporate Wikipedia Analysis

An analysis of Pharmaceutical company Wikipedia corporate pages. It looks at the views, edits and other statistics relating to the Top 5 Pharma companies an...

Via Gary Monk
more...
Gary Monk's curator insight, April 8, 2014 5:12 AM

Slideshare on Wikipedia that seems to have generated the most interest!

Rescooped by rhalper from Pharma Communication & Social Media
Scoop.it!

Patients Want Digital from Pharma | PM360

Patients Want Digital from Pharma | PM360 | Social Health | Scoop.it

New Survey data released by Accenture found that more than 75% of consumers expect drug companies to provide additional services that complement their medical products.

Digital platforms are frequently mentioned as the preferred method of contact. Sixty-nine percent of respondents said they’d prefer information from pharma companies via email, followed by printed materials (66%), websites (48%), mobile apps (44%) and social media (38%). Print media made the list, though patients have made it clear that they are seeking resources through digital channels.


Via Dinesh Chindarkar
more...
Jacqueline Kasian's curator insight, July 9, 2014 12:52 PM

This is where multi-channel marketing and integrated communications really comes into play. Big picture planning across channels that share a consistent message from print, web, mobile, and social.

Scooped by rhalper
Scoop.it!

Apple Flexes its Health Care Muscles

Apple Flexes its Health Care Muscles | Social Health | Scoop.it
If past form is anything to go by, Apple's announcement of HealthKit as part of its latest iOS release (iOS8) at the World Wide Developers Conference (WWDC) has marked a historic moment for digital and mobile health care....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rhalper
Scoop.it!

Why Olive Oil Is So Good For The Heart

Why Olive Oil Is So Good For The Heart | Social Health | Scoop.it
A new study shows why olive oil – paired with greens – may lower blood pressure and help the heart.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rhalper
Scoop.it!

Healthcare Marketers: Expand Your Reach with Online Videos | Dobies.com

As you plan your web content strategies, think about the growing reach of online videos. They’re an effective way to build your brand by engaging your audience.
rhalper's insight:

A Large proportion of health consumers are motivated to action after watching online health videos. I believe the numbers are even higher now, than stated in the article.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Pharma
Scoop.it!

What YouTube can do for pharma

What YouTube can do for pharma | Social Health | Scoop.it

If done right, social media in general—and YouTube in particular–can boost a pharma brand. Video is an engaging way to educate patients and healthcare professionals.

According to Manhattan Research: “1 in 2 ePharma consumers prefers video to text due to their learning style. The study showed that online health videos result in consumers following up on the call-to-action, with 3/4 of viewers doing additional research.”


Via Andrew Spong
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social Media And Ethical Concerns For Healthcare Professionals

“While social media use in healthcare has the potential to bring value to patient-provider relationships, it is not without its ethical and professional chall...”
Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

25 Content Marketing Tools for Curation, Creation, Promotion & Distribution | SocialTimes

25 Content Marketing Tools for Curation, Creation, Promotion & Distribution | SocialTimes | Social Health | Scoop.it
Content marketing is going to be bigger than ever this year. Ninety-two percent of marketers are already using content marketing. More than half of B2B and B2C marketers are increasing their content budgets in 2014. While the fundamentals of good content will never change, the tools and tactics — even the way people consume content — continue to evolve, and documenting your content strategy impacts your overall success. Check out this comprehensive guide to tools for creating and curating, promoting and distributing content — customer information included.A growing number of companies recognize the importance of original content for their marketing.
Via Jeff Domansky
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

HIPAA's Impact on Healthcare in Social Media -

HIPAA's Impact on Healthcare in Social Media - | Social Health | Scoop.it
It’s no secret that today’s healthcare patients are increasingly using digital tools as part of their overall health maintenance. A January 2013 Pew Research Study showed that 1 in 3 Americans used the internet to figure out a medical issue, and 41% of those surveyed acknowledged social media influenced their health care decisions. To put this plainly, people have added social sites to their health care toolbox, which creates a big impact for the healthcare industry. Like my post on the regulatory issues affecting the banking industry’s presence on social and digital, the healthcare industry has unique concerns when it comes to marketing on social. However, risks and challenges should not outweigh the unique opportunity that social presents for the industry.SayItSocial recently delivered a Social Media Training course on “Healthcare in the Digital World” and our research lead us to a plethora of resources and case studies on the subject of privacy violations in the healthcare industry. Healthcare professionals know all too well howHIPAA (Healthcare Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) protects the privacy of patients, but breaches still occur, and frequently on social media … You Don’t Have To Name Names to Violate HIPAAThere have been several well documented cases of physicians’ exposing their patients medical information on social media, often unintentionally. When deciding what to post online, Bradley H. Crotty,a physician with the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston stated:“Err on the side of caution, because you can’t go the other way. We first have to put ourselves in the shoes of the patient we may be discussing and then reflect if what we’re saying is appropriate.’’One physician that probably wishes she listened to Crotty’s advice is Dr. Amy Dunbar …OBGYN Talks SmackDr. Dunbar, an OB/GYN at Mercy Medical Center in St. Louis was simply fed up with her chronically late patient (how’s that for irony?). And in a move we’ve all seen before on our newsfeeds, Dr. Dunbar took to her Facebook page to gripe her annoyances. Sympathizing comments (some rather crass) from fellow healthcare comrades ensued. However, that is where the sympathy ended.Although she did not disclose the patient’s name, heated accusations of whether Dunbar violated the patient’s privacy erupted. Mercy’s “Mom’s To Be” Facebook group started a petition to investigate whether or not HIPAA laws were violated, since Dunbar specifically mentioned personal information that could help identify the patient. Fiery online debates of those demanding Dunbar’s resignation, to those that claimed Dunbar did nothing illegal, prompted Mercy to offer several statements and, as a result, gave them a big PR headache. After a thorough investigation, Mercy announced that while Dunbar’s Facebook statement “did not represent a breach of privacy laws, they were not appropriate and not in line with our values of respect and dignity.” With Dr. Dunbar’s page now set as private, it it unlikely she will be venting about her patients to the social world anytime soon. Thus, Healthcare Organizations Need Social Media PoliciesThe Washington DC based law firm Arnold & Porter LLP notes that ultimately the employer can be liable if their employee discloses private patient information, with fines ranging from $100 to $1.5 billion and perhaps even jail time. It is crucial for healthcare facilities to develop and implement defined social media policies outlining examples of privacy breaches. So before hospitals can embark on a social crusade, organizations must develop a social media strategy that incorporates their existing communication guidelines with their particular business culture and break down HIPAA into their social media communications and policy guidelines. When done correctly, a successful social media policy can create and strengthen doctor-patient relationships, just ask the Mayo Clinic, the Number One Social Media Friendly Hospital. They are clearly ontosomething.
Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rhalper
Scoop.it!

Healthcare Provider Websites: Give Patients What They Want | Dobies.com

Healthcare Provider Websites: Give Patients What They Want | Dobies.com | Social Health | Scoop.it
The most successful healthcare websites put patient needs and interests first. Here are some things to consider for your site that won’t require an overhaul.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rhalper
Scoop.it!

How much exercise should adults get each day?

How much exercise should adults get each day? | Social Health | Scoop.it
We all know we need to exercise, but how much? Find out here. (How much exercise should adults get each day?: Strength training can include use of weight machines or activit...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Pharma Communication & Social Media
Scoop.it!

FDA releases draft social media guidance - PMLiVE

FDA releases draft social media guidance - PMLiVE | Social Health | Scoop.it

The FDA's just-released draft social media guidance has been more than four years in the making but finally looks to offer industry some substantial direction on its use of digital media.

Given that the US regulator's November 2009 hearing on “using the internet and social media tools” encompassed such burning digital issues of yesteryear as Google Sidewiki, it's fair to say the guidance wasn't exactly rushed through.

Following up on that hearing the FDA yesterday set out its position on 'interactive promotional media', that is “tools and technologies that often allow for real-time communications and interactions”.

These tools and technologies, it explains, include blogs, microblogs social networking sites, online communities, live podcasts, which pharma uses to promote its drugs.


Via Dinesh Chindarkar
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social Media: A Patient’s Information Tool of Choice

Social Media: A Patient’s Information Tool of Choice | Social Health | Scoop.it

Most patients and healthcare consumers prefer using social media to look for information relating to their health and medical care. Take a peek at why social media is an emerging trend that you can utilize to boost your online medical and dental practice marketing efforts.

According to the digital marketing agency FathomDelivers.com, around 40 percent of consumers comb through Facebook, Twitter, Yelp, Healthgrades and other social networking platforms to find healthcare reviews. When browsing for medical information, patients prefer websites such as YouTube, Twitter and Facebook. About 25 percent of these healthcare consumers have shared health-related information on these social media websites. Moreover, roughly 41 percent of people admitted social media plays a significant role in choosing their healthcare provider.

For medical, dental and other healthcare practitioners, social media is your friend; your ally. Use it to gain valuable access to the lives of people seeking care. Social media can also be used to increase your practice’s awareness, improve patient engagement, manage your online reputation and augment your practice’s marketing and advertising efforts.

Connecting Lives

Social media is a great platform for interacting with and educating healthcare consumers on matters relating to treatment and care. As a healthcare provider, you can also provide expert support through online conversations with your patients experiencing certain health conditions. But make sure you don’t discuss any private patient information.

Increase Practice Awareness and Patient Engagement

Do you want to spread the word about your practice? Do it through social media. According to SocialBakers.com, Facebook has about 1.15 billion users. On the other hand Twitter has around a half–billion users. With these websites’ massive reach, along with today’s prevalent use of mobile devices and smartphones, you are sure to engage your patients where they hang out.

Nurture Your Reputation

Since everything is accessible through the Internet, you, as a healthcare practitioner, should be mindful about how online healthcare consumers perceive you and your practice. You can use various social media platforms like Yelp, Healthgrades and Vitals to manage your online reputation and improve online users’ impression of you and your practice.

At a time when people turn to online resources like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to look for everything they need, concentrating your practice marketing efforts through social media is a smart, practical move.


Via Plus91
more...
TheSocialPhysio's curator insight, January 25, 2014 8:27 PM

I have said it before, and I will say it again. Your next patient is looking, researching and hunting for you ONLINE! Have a presence, demonstrate your skill and your effectiveness and the phone will start RINGING!

Rescooped by rhalper from Health Care Social Media
Scoop.it!

5 Ways Social Media Helps Promote Good Health

5 Ways Social Media Helps Promote Good Health | Social Health | Scoop.it

Alexander B. Howard (@digiphile) is the Government 2.0 Washington Correspondent for O’Reilly Media, where he reports on technology, open government and online civics. He will sh...


Via Gary Monk
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rhalper
Scoop.it!

What's pharma's impact on the mobile health app space? These 3 graphs offer some clues

What's pharma's impact on the mobile health app space? These 3 graphs offer some clues | Social Health | Scoop.it
A report highlighting the mobile health app landscape charts pharma companies that have produced the most apps, such as Bayer, Merck and Novartis.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rhalper
Scoop.it!

Apple sees mobile health push as 'moral obligation' | Cult of Mac

Apple sees mobile health push as 'moral obligation' | Cult of Mac | Social Health | Scoop.it
Craig Federighi showing iOS 8's Health app to the world last week at WWDC. Photo: Roberto Baldwin/The Next Web. Apple will be working closely with the Food and Drug Administration on future products related to the health ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by rhalper
Scoop.it!

J&J scoffs at patent cliff as pharma boosts firm's first-quarter earnings - MarketWatch (blog)

J&J scoffs at patent cliff as pharma boosts firm's first-quarter earnings - MarketWatch (blog) | Social Health | Scoop.it
Chron.com J&J scoffs at patent cliff as pharma boosts firm's first-quarter earnings MarketWatch (blog) While the company reported a 3% drop in sales at its consumer products division and no improvement in medical-device revenue, J&J's...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Hospitals: Trends in Branding and Marketing
Scoop.it!

Healthcare Social Media: Directing the Conversation

Healthcare Social Media: Directing the Conversation | Social Health | Scoop.it
Blog. Keep up on the latest trends in healthcare marketing. ... When we wrote last year about healthcare marketers expanding reach with online videos, we reported that 32 percent of people watch health videos online.

Via eMedToday
more...
eMedToday's curator insight, July 21, 2013 9:23 PM

This article underscore the need for hospital to do daily communication of some kind, 

 

And use video

 

lso worth noting is video shares. When we wrote last year about healthcare marketers expanding reach with online videos, we reported that 32 percent of people watch health videos online. Research shows at least half of those people don’t just watch – they also share, provided they feel it’s something others want or need to see. Take, for example, the popular Cleveland Clinic video called “Empathy” – no doubt you’ve seen or heard of it, since it made the rounds on several social sites thanks to social sharing:

Rescooped by rhalper from Social Media Article Sharing
Scoop.it!

The Power of Social Media in Health Care - Huffington Post

The Power of Social Media in Health Care - Huffington Post | Social Health | Scoop.it
“ The Power of Social Media in Health Care Huffington Post When we looked at the social media landscape of healthcare CIOs, it could only be described as a ghost town.”
Via Alan Horton
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Growth of Social Media in Health Technology

Growth of Social Media in Health Technology | Social Health | Scoop.it
“One-stop place to find HL7 and other healthcare integration information to meet the increased demand in HL7 and healthcare interoperability.”
Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Pharma Health Social Media Facebook Cases

“Presentation at the SMI Social Media congress, January 2014. A case comparison of 4 Pharma companies efforts on Facebook. GSK, Pfizer, Novartis and Boehrin...”
Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Patient Centered Healthcare
Scoop.it!

In-Depth: A brief history of digital patient engagement tools

In-Depth: A brief history of digital patient engagement tools | Social Health | Scoop.it

Without a doubt patient engagement is one of the more important trends in healthcare and health IT right now. Over the past few years the tools that look to enable patient engagement between providers and patients have changed markedly. It is important to note, however, that the tools themselves are just a small part of the story — they can go a long way toward improving patient engagement, though. The drivers of the patient engagement buzz are varied, but one big one is the federal government’s Office of the National Coordinator’s (ONC) Meaningful Use (MU) program, which is beginning to include requirements for very basic patient engagement services. 


ONC’s MU Stage II requirements include at least three patient engagement related deliverables of providers. To meet Stage II, providers must give patients clinical summaries after each visit. They must use electronic secure messaging to communicate with patients on relevant health information with a minimum of 5 percent of their patients during the review period. They must also provide patients with the ability to view online, download and transmit information about a hospital admission and give them access to any health information about that patient the providers receives — within four days of receiving it.


Read more: http://mobihealthnews.com/29985/in-depth-a-brief-history-of-digital-patient-engagement-tools/


Via Parag Vora
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

The side effects of pharma’s digital revolution

The side effects of pharma’s digital revolution | Social Health | Scoop.it
On a recent trip to the US, I couldn’t help notice the huge difference in the way American pharmaceutical brands are promoted compared to here in the UK. Vast sums are lavished on TV advertising prompting the good citizens of the US to ‘ask your doctor today’ about heartburn, insomnia, thin blood and, of course, erectile dysfunction. As if the scare-mongering messages aimed at men and women at a certain life stage weren’t enough, over two thirds of the ads were given over to the terrifying small print. ‘Side effects include…’ (deep breath).My immediate response – ‘why?’ Surely there is a better, more cost effective, way to promote your brand given the changing dynamics of healthcare marketing? The rise of the empowered patient, access to information online, the decline of blockbuster drugs and the emergence of specialist treatments all fly in the face of mass-market ‘one-to-many’ TV advertising. Enter digital marketing, stage left.On closer inspection, though, change is indeed afoot. US healthcare companies are spending far less on TV advertising compared to five years ago and are instead putting investment behind new digital solutions and a more targeted approach. TV spend dropped 10% in 2012 whilst pharma's overall direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising dropped by 11.5% to just $3.47 billion.To understand the recent fall, we need to look back at the market context around the time TV advertising of prescribed drugs was first allowed in the US. A series of huge blockbuster drugs hit the market and pharma cos went to great expense to leverage their patent protection. It was Rufen, manufactured by Boots, to first get plugged on US television in 1983.Worried about consumer safety and a legal backlash, the FDA introduced strict rules in 1985 requiring the ads to include significant risk information about the prescription drug in question. Hence the rise of the tediously long informercial, still present on US TV today. And pages of small print in press ads. But even this didn’t put the big drug companies off.Now, the landscape has changed, meaning the limitless budgets of yesteryear (over $5 billion in 2006) don’t offer the same virtually guaranteed returns. Generics have eroded the market share of the big licensed brands and, more significantly, “citizen scientists” seek endorsement from their own social communities, rather than take the TV ads at their word, and look for genuine data-based persuasion from the drug companies and their doctors.Hence the huge opportunity for digital in pharma. Today’s patient goes online first, to the surgery second. Brands should therefore concentrate on educating consumers, not just HCPs, with broader condition-based information that presents options and helps patients make the right choice.Brands using digital to help, not sell to, consumers will reap the rewards as they will be seen to empower end-users. Hence the emergence of sophisticated apps, online health portals, and other digital innovations that slowly but surely are transforming healthcare, including the prescription and monitoring of medications.Pharma companies are even further behind the curve when it comes to social media. A host of forces are at play here. Regulation cannot keep up with the technology, brands are terrified of leaving themselves open to litigious patients but, most fundamentally, the ‘always on’ 24 /7 nature of the medium jars with the painfully slow internal approval processes of most pharma companies. Imagine if every tweet you put out needed ten people to approve it? The moment would pass. It’s also telling that the MHRA, the body that regulates the advertising of medicines in the UK, has no reference at all to social media in its Blue Book guide.But pharma will catch up. It has to. We are seeing more clients embrace digital – new websites, the trialling of e-commerce, the creation of patient communities and even baby steps into social media. Ultimately, consumers hold the cards so it’s up to the pharma companies to respond.
Via Plus91
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Nonprofits
Scoop.it!

Pharmaceutical Industry | Matching Gifts at Bristol-Myers, J&J, Hoffman-La Roche, and Pfizer

Pharmaceutical companies, in addition to developing the latest life saving medicines, generate enormous revenue. This industry is one of the largest contributors to nonprofit organizations through matching gift programs regardless of the economic climate. Companies in this market generate profits in both times of boom or bust. While other companies were hit hard by the recession, pharmaceuticals remained financially strong and committed to their corporate philanthropy. Companies with generous employee giving programs can be a great source of additional fundraising. List of Pharmaceutical Companies that Match Donations We ve compiled a list of the best in class employee giving programs from the top pharmaceutical companies in the US. If your nonprofit has never received a matching gift from one of these industry giants, it could pay to familiarize yourself with this list. Johnson & Johnson Johnson & Johnson was one of the first companies in the medical supplies business, when they bega


Via Double the Donation
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by rhalper from Pharma Communication & Social Media
Scoop.it!

Nearly half of leading drugmakers "now actively using social media"

Nearly half of leading drugmakers "now actively using social media" | Social Health | Scoop.it

Twenty-three of the top 50 pharmaceutical companies worldwide are now actively using social media - on Facebook, Twitter or YouTube - to engage with patients, although only 10 are using all three services for healthcare-related topics, according to a new report from the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics. To examine the current state of consumer behaviours on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, researchers developed the IMS Health Social Media Engagement Index, and this shows Johnson & Johnson to be the top-ranking firm out of those reviewed for the report, says IMS Health. Mid-sized organisations such as Novo Nordisk, Boehringer Ingelheim and UCB are utilising social media as effectively, or more effectively, than the largest pharmaceutical companies, it adds, and also finds that the overall level of engagement between companies and patients has increased steadily during the past year.


Via Dinesh Chindarkar
more...
No comment yet.