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Rescooped by Valentin Chirosca from Geography Education
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The surprising math of cities and corporations

"Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities — that wealth, crime rate, walking speed and many other aspects of a city can be deduced from a single number: the city's population. In this mind-bending talk from TEDGlobal he shows how it works and how similar laws hold for organisms and corporations."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2:44 PM

While corporations rise and fall, it is quite rare for a city to entirely fail as an economic system.  Huge cities have some negative consequences, but the networks that operate in the city function more efficiently on economies of scale in a way that offsets the negatives.  Increasing a city's population will continue to improve the economies of scale (larger cities have higher wages per capita, more creative employment per capita, etc.).  However, this growth requires major technological innovations to sustain long-term growth.  

 

Tagsurban, planningmegacities, industry, economic, scaleTED, video.

Van Brienen Networks Ed van den Berg's curator insight, December 14, 3:17 PM

Not surprisingly the DNA of cities is a follow-up of human DNA and understanding this will explain and predict how the body of a city will develop!

Rescooped by Valentin Chirosca from Geography Education
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U.S. Cities With Bigger Economies Than Entire Countries

U.S. Cities With Bigger Economies Than Entire Countries | social geography | Scoop.it
How do the individual economies of U.S. cities stack up against the world? Here’s a few quiz questions that can be answered with our chart of the 50 largest U.S. metro areas.

 

This article shows the economic strength of numerous greater metropolitan regions in the United States.  Even more important than the article is the "Interactive Graphics" which presents the tabular data of the top countries by GDP interlaced with U.S. metro area's GDPs.  Amazingly, 11 metropolitan areas (if they were independent countries) would rank in the top 50 countries of the world based on total GDP.


Via Seth Dixon
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Kelsey Saunders's comment, August 24, 2012 9:25 PM
This article really shows how economically high the united states is. It is crazy to think that New York is larger economically than a lot of countries such as Poland, Mexico, and Sweden. I wouldn't have ever thought that that would be possible. It makes me wonder how different it would be to live in a place that is very low economically.
Bradford Baumstark's comment, September 3, 2012 7:52 AM
I kinda expected cities like New York and Seattle to be on the list but out city is on the list to, above complete contires. That's what really astonished me because Virgigna Beach and Norfolk and Newport News aren't big cities. Some how we still have larger economies than entire countries like Angola Cuba and Oman. It makes me wonder how entire contires would be able to suport their citizens with an ecomomy smaller thn 3 cities.
Hannah Provost's comment, September 10, 2012 7:42 PM
This article is an eye opener, To think that New York is larger economically than countries like Sweden really puts it into perspective of how big the United States Is economically compared to other countries. I never thought that a single CITY in america would have a higher GDP than a free standing country. unbelievable.