Social Foraging
68.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Social Foraging
Dynamics of Social Interaction
Curated by Ashish Umre
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

'Good Times' brainwave app blocks phone calls when the user is busy, wins 1st prize ($30,000) of AT&T Hackathon

'Good Times' brainwave app blocks phone calls when the user is busy, wins 1st prize ($30,000) of AT&T Hackathon | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Developed in 24 hours only, 'Good Times', a brain-controlled application connects to the Necomimi brainwave cat ears and blocks phone calls when the user is busy at work or a conversation.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Approximate Bayesian Computation

Approximate Bayesian Computation | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) constitutes a class of computational methods rooted in Bayesian statistics. In all model-based statistical inference, the likelihood function is of central importance, since it expresses the probability of the observed data under a particular statistical model, and thus quantifies the support data lend to particular values of parameters and to choices among different models. For simple models, an analytical formula for the likelihood function can typically be derived. However, for more complex models, an analytical formula might be elusive or the likelihood function might be computationally very costly to evaluate. ABC methods bypass the evaluation of the likelihood function. In this way, ABC methods widen the realm of models for which statistical inference can be considered. ABC methods are mathematically well-founded, but they inevitably make assumptions and approximations whose impact needs to be carefully assessed. Furthermore, the wider application domain of ABC exacerbates the challenges of parameter estimation and model selection. ABC has rapidly gained popularity over the last years and in particular for the analysis of complex problems arising in biological sciences (e.g., in population genetics, ecology, epidemiology, and systems biology).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Computer, electrical engineers working to help biologists cope with big data

Computer, electrical engineers working to help biologists cope with big data | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Liang Dong held up a clear plastic cube, an inch or so across, just big enough to hold 10 to 20 tiny seeds.

 

Using sophisticated sensors and software, researchers can precisely control the light, temperature, humidity and carbon dioxide inside that cube.

 

Dong -- an Iowa State University assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, of chemical and biological engineering and an associate of the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory -- calls it a "microsystem instrument." Put hundreds of those cubes together and researchers can simultaneously grow thousands of seeds and seedlings in different conditions and see what happens. How, for example, do the plants react when it is hot and dry? Or carbon dioxide levels change? Or light intensity is adjusted very slightly?

 

The instrument designed and built by Dong's research group will keep track of all that by using a robotic arm to run a camera over the cubes and take thousands of images of the growing seeds and seedlings.

 

Plant scientists will use the images to analyze the plants' observable characteristics -- the leaf color, the root development, the shoot size. All those observations are considered a plant's phenotype. And while plant scientists understand plant genetics very well, Dong said they don't have a lot of data about how genetics and environment combine to influence phenotype.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Researchers use data from traffic app to identify high frequency accident locations

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers reveal that data culled from geosocial networks like the GPS traffic app Waze can help prevent traffic incidents with better deployment of police resources at the most accident prone areas.

 

Only now are we beginning to discover the potential in the huge amount of data collected daily," explains BGU researcher and Ph.D. student Michael Fire. "Studies of this kind, which monitor events such as traffic accidents over time, can help the police identify dangerous sections of roads in real time, or alternatively, locations where few police are needed."

 

The paper, "Data Mining Opportunities in Geosocial Networks for Improving Road Safety," was presented at the IEEE 27th Convention of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in Israel. Waze records location data and enables users to upload and share comments on any detail, including traffic alerts, accidents or police presence. According to its Web site, Waze has 30 million worldwide users and describes itself as "a community-based traffic and navigation app whose users share real-time traffic and road info, saving time and gas money."

"Only now are we beginning to discover the potential in the huge amount of data collected daily," explains BGU researcher and Ph.D. student Michael Fire. "Studies of this kind, which monitor events such as traffic accidents over time, can help the police identify dangerous sections of roads in real time, or alternatively, locations where few police are needed."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-01-traffic-app-high-frequency-accident.html#jCp"Only now are we beginning to discover the potential in the huge amount of data collected daily," explains BGU researcher and Ph.D. student Michael Fire. "Studies of this kind, which monitor events such as traffic accidents over time, can help the police identify dangerous sections of roads in real time, or alternatively, locations where few police are needed." The paper, "Data Mining Opportunities in Geosocial Networks for Improving Road Safety," was presented at the IEEE 27th Convention of Electrical and Electronics Engineers in Israel. Waze records location data and enables users to upload and share comments on any detail, including traffic alerts, accidents or police presence. According to its Web site, Waze has 30 million worldwide users and describes itself as "a community-based traffic and navigation app whose users share real-time traffic and road info, saving time and gas money."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-01-traffic-app-high-frequency-accident.html#jCp
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Hybridization of Evolutionary Algorithms

Evolutionary algorithms are good general problem solver but suffer from a lack of domain specific knowledge. However, the problem specific knowledge can be added to evolutionary algorithms by hybridizing. Interestingly, all the elements of the evolutionary algorithms can be hybridized. In this chapter, the hybridization of the three elements of the evolutionary algorithms is discussed: the objective function, the survivor selection operator and the parameter settings. As an objective function, the existing heuristic function that construct the solution of the problem in traditional way is used. However, this function is embedded into the evolutionary algorithm that serves as a generator of new solutions.

 

In addition, the objective function is improved by local search heuristics. The new neutral selection operator has been developed that is capable to deal with neutral solutions, i.e. solutions that have the different representation but expose the equal values of objective function. The aim of this operator is to directs the evolutionary search into a new undiscovered regions of the search space. To avoid of wrong setting of parameters that control the behavior of the evolutionary algorithm, the self-adaptation is used. Finally, such hybrid self-adaptive evolutionary algorithm is applied to the two real-world NP-hard problems: the graph 3-coloring and the optimization of markers in the clothing industry. Extensive experiments shown that these hybridization improves the results of the evolutionary algorithms a lot. Furthermore, the impact of the particular hybridizations is analyzed in details as well.

  
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Cheating slime mold gets the upper hand

Cheating slime mold gets the upper hand | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

A  ‘cheater’ mutation (chtB) inDictyostelium discoideum, a free living slime mould able to co-operate as social organism when food is scarce, allows the cheater strain to exploit its social partner, finds a new study published in BioMed Central’s open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology. The mutation ensures that when mixed with ‘normal’ Dictyostelium  more than the fair share of cheaters become spores, dispersing to a new environment, and avoiding dying as stalk cells. 

Dictyostelium have an unusual life style. They generally live as individual amoeboid cells, eating bacteria in leaf litter and soil. However when they run out of food they form a multi-cellular ‘slug’ capable of travelling to a new environment. However if conditions are right they behave more like a fungus, producing a stalk and a fruiting body which releases spores. During this co-operative behaviour approximately 20% become stalk cells which are doomed to starvation but, after dispersal, the spores germinate into new amoeba.

The chtB strain is able to reduce the ability of normalDictyostelium to form spores so that when mixed in equal numbers with wild type Dictyostelium 60% of the spores will be chtB. The chtB mutation appeared to be normal in all other respects and the mutation had no ‘fitness cost’ which might impede its behaviour or lifespan. In fact the mutation allowed chtB to divide faster in liquid medium.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Biomimicry: sharkskin ships and whale flipper wind turbines

Biomimicry: sharkskin ships and whale flipper wind turbines | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
From the splendour of a peacock’s feathers to the aerodynamic body of a cheetah, natural selection has worked to engineer animals to the highest standards for survival and prosperity in their environment. Throughout history, humans have tried to emulate the wonders and beauty of the natural world in science, design and art. 

Over the past 20 years, however, this process of learning from and emulating nature has developed into a defined scientific discipline and burgeoning industry, known as “biomimicry”. 

People have always looked to nature for inspiration. In the sixteenth century, Leonardo Da Vinci made detailed sketches of birds’ anatomy to better understand the science of flight and foster ideas for his “flying machine”. The Wright brothers, over 400 years later, were still studying birds’ wings, as a potential model for the first airplane.

Yet it was only in 1997 that the term “biomimicry” was coined, and the concept really began to take off as a serious practice in the business world.

The term “biomimicry” was first used by the American biologist and authorJanine Benyus, in her book Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature. She defines biomimicry, not merely as learning “about” the natural world, but learning “from” it. Benyus calls this “the conscious emulation of life’s genius”.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Artificial Intelligence in Motion: Introduction to Recommendations with Map-Reduce and mrjob

Artificial Intelligence in Motion: Introduction to Recommendations with Map-Reduce and mrjob | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

I will present how can we use map-reduce programming model for making recommendations.   Recommender systems are quite popular among shopping sites and social network thee days. How do they do it ?   Generally, the user interaction data available from items and products in shopping sites and social networks are enough information to build a recommendation engine using classic techniques such as Collaborative Filtering.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Complexity, Requirements and The Perfect Cup Of Tea

Complexity, Requirements and The Perfect Cup Of Tea | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

The words any software developer dreads hearing are “Can you just change this one thing for this one user/client/company”. The requests usually have perfectly valid reasons, but it’s sometimes hard to explain to the person asking for the feature why it’s more work than just the code. Most of the time it’s not the coding that’s terribly hard, it’s making it just so for that particular user, testing it, maintaining it and then you have the nightmare two years down the line when you have to change code that touches it.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Testing Einstein's famous equation E=mc2 in outer space

Testing Einstein's famous equation E=mc<sup>2</sup> in outer space | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

University of Arizona physicist Andrei Lebed has stirred the physics community with an intriguing idea yet to be tested experimentally: The world's most iconic equation, Albert Einstein's E=mc2, may be correct or not depending on where you are in space.


With the first explosions of atomic bombs, the world became witness to one of the most important and consequential principles in physics: Energy and mass, fundamentally speaking, are the same thing and can, in fact, be converted into each other.

 

This was first demonstrated by Albert Einstein's Theory of Special Relativity and famously expressed in his iconic equation, E=mc2, where E stands for energy, m for mass and c for the speed of light (squared).

 

Although physicists have since validated Einstein's equation in countless experiments and calculations, and many technologies including mobile phones and GPS navigation depend on it, University of Arizona physics professor Andrei Lebed has stirred the physics community by suggesting that E=mc2 may not hold up in certain circumstances.

 

The key to Lebed's argument lies in the very concept of mass itself. According to accepted paradigm, there is no difference between the mass of a moving object that can be defined in terms of its inertia, and the mass bestowed on that object by a gravitational field. In simple terms, the former, also called inertial mass, is what causes a car's fender to bend upon impact of another vehicle, while the latter, called gravitational mass, is commonly referred to as "weight."


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

GraphLab - Large-Scale Machine Learning on Graphs

Designing and implementing efficient, bug free parallel and distributed algorithms can be very challenging. To address this challenge high-level data-parallel abstractions like Map-Reduce expose a simple computational pattern that isolates users form the complexities of large-scale parallel and distribute system design. Unfortunately, many important computational tasks are not inherently data-parallel and cannot be efficiently or intuitively expressed in data-parallel abstractions.

 

GraphLab is a high-level graph-parallel abstraction that efficiently and intuitively expresses computational dependencies. Unlike Map-Reduce where computation is applied to independent records, computation in GraphLab is applied to dependent records which are stored as vertices in a large distributed data-graph. Computation in GraphLab is expressed as a vertex-programs which are executed in parallel on each vertex and can interact with neighboring vertices. In contrast to the more general message passing and actor models, GraphLab constrains the interaction of vertex-programs to the graph structure enabling a wide range of system optimizations. GraphLab programs interact by directly reading the state of neighboring vertices and by modifying the state of adjacent edges. In addition, vertex-programs can signal neighboring vertex-programs causing them to be rerun at some point in the future.

more...
Gary Bamford's comment, January 17, 2013 3:20 AM
I have no idea what this means but it sounds something like how the old mechanical integration engines used to operate!?
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Hurricane Sandy, Open Data and Social Media

From hackathons to social media, open government is transforming the way that Mayor Bloomberg’s administration and New York City government serve the public. And there has been no greater testament to open government’s potential than the strategy and innovation in action during Hurricane Sandy.

 

Learning from our experience during Hurricane Irene, in the days leading up to Hurricane Sandy’s landfall in New York City, government technologists reached out to the data science community to share recently updated hurricane evacuation zone maps based on up-to-the-minute flooding projections. To ensure wide  public access to this valuable information, the City’s IT Department immediately published the data to the City’s Open Data portal, enabling developers and designers to develop emergency maps and applications. For the second consecutive year, the City also partnered with organizations such as WNYC.org, The New York Times, and Google’s Crisis Response team, which developed a customized New York City-centric Hurricane Sandy map featuring evacuation zones, shelters, food distributions centers, warming centers, recovery centers and more resources.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Psychologists Uncover Hidden Signals of Trust — Using a Robot

Psychologists Uncover Hidden Signals of Trust — Using a Robot | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

“In spite of the hardness and ruthlessness I thought I saw in his face, I got the impression that here was a man who could be relied upon when he had given his word."

 

Neville Chamberlain’s first impression of Adolf Hitler can charitably be described as an error in judgment. Rarely do our own miscalculations result in tragedy, yet popular sentiment seems to hold that when it comes to truly trusting others, you just never know. Wolves in sheep’s clothing abound, and prudence demands skepticism. Whether we are deciding on a babysitter, a doctor, or a car, we try to not base our judgments on our first impressions. We ask for references, and look up reviews and blue book values.  We know that “I’ve just got a good feeling about this” can be famous last words.

 

But this may not be a full portrayal of our capacity to judge others’ character. New research led by David DeSteno at Northeastern University suggests that when it comes to deciding whom to trust, our first impressions can be quite accurate. In fact, personality traits such as honesty and fairness are linked to specific kinds of nonverbal cues, and humans can pick up on these signals during interactions. According to these researchers we are like robots, programmed to move in particular ways if we are honest. To know who to trust, one simply needs to be able to read the patterns.

Ashish Umre's insight:

Link to the research paper: http://socialemotions.org/page5/files/Trust%20Paper_PsycSci_Final.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Visual Data Mining of Biological Networks: One Size Does Not Fit All

Visual Data Mining of Biological Networks: One Size Does Not Fit All | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

High-throughput technologies produce massive amounts of data. However, individual methods yield data specific to the technique used and biological setup. The integration of such diverse data is necessary for the qualitative analysis of information relevant to hypotheses or discoveries. It is often useful to integrate these datasets using pathways and protein interaction networks to get a broader view of the experiment. The resulting network needs to be able to focus on either the large-scale picture or on the more detailed small-scale subsets, depending on the research question and goals. In this tutorial, we illustrate a workflow useful to integrate, analyze, and visualize data from different sources, and highlight important features of tools to support such analyses.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Neuroscientist Says Green Consciousness Is in Right Brain

Neuroscientist Says Green Consciousness Is in Right Brain | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

When neuroscientist Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor had a stroke that put her logical, sequential left brain temporarily out of commission, she experienced a temporary state of peaceful, all-connected consciousness that changed her forever. She described this in her best-selling book My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist's Personal Journey. At first she saw this intuitive and wholistic right brain state as crucial to human mental health but after a visit to Antarctica with Al Gore she began to see how it might also offer clues about how a desperately-needed new eco-consciousness might be as close as the right side of our brains. She describes this in a Jan. 4, 2013 Huffington Post story, "Does Our Planet Need a Stroke of Insight"?

 

But how to experience this right-brain eco-connection without having to go through a potentially deadly stroke?

 

The idea of using various methods for accessing the right brain isn't new, of course. Far from it. But the recent emphasis seems to have been on how to connect with this side of ourselves merely so we can succeed at some left brain activity like business or goal-oriented sports.

 

Taylor's critical insight is that by entering this altered, nonlinear state of consciousness we may reconnect with an important awareness that, when combined with the more practical, rational left-brain insights of science, might allow us to more effectively address our current environmental situation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

A Mathematical Approach to Safeguarding Private Data

A Mathematical Approach to Safeguarding Private Data | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
A mathematical technique called “differential privacy” gives researchers access to vast repositories of personal data while meeting a high standard for privacy protection.

 

In 1997, when Massachusetts began making health records of state employees available to medical researchers, the government removed patients’ names, addresses, and Social Security numbers. William Weld, then the governor, assured the public that identifying individual patients in the records would be impossible.

 

Within days, an envelope from a graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology arrived at Weld’s office. It contained the governor’s health records.

 

Although the state had removed all obvious identifiers, it had left each patient’s date of birth, sex and ZIP code. By cross-referencing this information with voter-registration records, Latanya Sweeney was able to pinpoint Weld’s records.

 

Sweeney’s work, along with other notable privacy breaches over the past 15 years, has raised questions about the security of supposedly anonymous information.

 

“We’ve learned that human intuition about what is private is not especially good,” said Frank McSherry of Microsoft Research Silicon Valley in Mountain View, Calif. “Computers are getting more and more sophisticated at pulling individual data out of things that a naive person might think are harmless.”

 

As awareness of these privacy concerns has grown, many organizations have clamped down on their sensitive data, uncertain about what, if anything, they can release without jeopardizing the privacy of individuals. But this attention to privacy has come at a price, cutting researchers off from vast repositories of potentially invaluable data.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Toyota's Semi-Autonomous Car Will Keep You Safe

Toyota's Semi-Autonomous Car Will Keep You Safe | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

At a CES press conference yesterday, Toyota presented its semi-autonomous Lexus Advanced Active Safety Research Vehicle, a car designed to take over from you when an accident is imminent to keep you in one piece.

 

To be clear, this is a research vehicle, and it's not designed to turn into a Google-style autonomous car. It's more about a high-level of driver assistance, with the car using sensors and intelligence to augment what its human driver is doing. Think of it as a co-pilot, essentially, there to point things out and give you help when you need it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

4th International Workshop on Modeling Social Media: Mining, Modeling and Recommending 'Things' in Social Media - Workshop at Hypertext 2013

In our first workshop on Modeling Social Media (MSM 2010 in Toronto, Canada), we explored various different models of social media ranging from user modeling, hypertext models, software engineering models, sociological models and framework models. In our second workshop (MSM 2011 in Boston, USA), we addressed the user interface aspects of modeling social media. In our third workshop (MSM 2012 in Milwaukee, USA), we looked at the collective intelligence in social media, i.e. making sense of the content and context from social media websites such as Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Foursquare by analyzing tweets, tags, blog posts, likes, posts and check-ins, in order to create a new knowledge and semantic meaning. With this year's workshop we aim to attract researchers from all over the world working in the field of social media mining, modeling and end-user applications. In particular, we would like to invite researchers working on the important field of "recommender systems" for social media which is gaining more and more in importance due to the increasing information overload problem. 


The goal of this workshop is to continue our vibrant discussion on social media mining and modelling with a special focus on recommender systems for social media applications. Hence, the workshop aims to attract and discuss various novel aspects of social media mining, modelling and doing recommendations on top of these data/models. In short the workshop invites topics such as social media mining methods/techniques, novel approaches to model users or things in social media, frameworks to harvest and/or display social media data and new social media recommender methods/techniques/algorithms or interfaces supporting users for instance in information finding, meta-data application etc. Thus, our goal is to bring together researchers and practitioners from all over the world with diverse backgrounds interested in 1) exploring different perspectives and approaches to mine (complex) and analyse social media data, 2) modelling social media users and 3) building applications such as recommender systems on top of this data/models.

Ashish Umre's insight:
Submission deadlinesPaper Submission:Monday, February 04, 2013Acceptance Notification:Monday, February 18, 2013Paper Final Version Due: Thursday, February 28, 2013Workshop: May 01, 2013
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Biomimicry Solves Age-old Industrial Air Pollution Problem

Biomimicry Solves Age-old Industrial Air Pollution Problem | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Enter inventor Matthew Johnson from the Department of Chemistry at theUniversity of Copenhagen. "Biomimicry" may not be the perfect term to describe what Johnson did, which mimics how Mother Nature cleans Earth's atmosphere rather than how any particular life-form works, but the concept of copying natural processes seems to fit in the category. Johnson describes his inspiration:


"I have investigated the self-cleaning mechanism of the atmosphere for years. Suddenly I realized, that the mechanism is so simple, that we could wrap it in a box and use it to clean indoor air. This makes for a better indoor climate, and in this particular case it also removes smells from this industrial process allowing the company to stay and making the neighbours happy."

 

Earth's atmosphere cleans itself when polluting gasses plus sunlight plus naturally occurring ozone cause the pollutants to clump together as particles, which can then be washed out in the next rain.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

The Materiality of Algorithms

The Materiality of Algorithms | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

One of the most exciting aspects of the new research analyzing algorithmic culture is the manner by which portions of that research are increasingly routing around the slow, painful process of traditional academic knowledge production. This is not to say that the credentialing process afforded by peer-reviewed journals or university presses is irrelevant, but it is to say that this aspect of scholarly work is only one form among the many others now emerging both on- and offline.  Overviews of stand-alone talks are now available through a variety of blogs, while a double session at this year’s 4S on “The Politics of Algorithms” was illuminating for those of us lucky enough to attend.  Journals like Limn blur the boundaries between old and new forms of scholarship. All of this is just a long way of saying that, since I first alluded to the notion of a “sociology of algorithms” in 2011, I’ve been stimulated by my contact with a much wider community doing great work on these issues, much of which I’ve encountered through this very blog.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Cognitive benefit of lifelong bilingualism

Seniors who have spoken two languages since childhood are faster than single-language speakers at switching from one task to another, according to a study published in the January 9 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. Compared to their monolingual peers, lifelong bilinguals also show different patterns of brain activity when making the switch, the study found.


The findings suggest the value of regular stimulating mental activity across the lifetime. As people age, cognitive flexibility -- the ability to adapt to unfamiliar or unexpected circumstances -- and related "executive" functions decline. Recent studies suggest lifelong bilingualism may reduce this decline -- a boost that may stem from the experience of constantly switching between languages. However, how brain activity differs between older bilinguals and monolinguals was previously unclear.

 

In the current study, Brian T. Gold, PhD, and colleagues at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare the brain activity of healthy bilingual seniors (ages 60-68) with that of healthy monolingual seniors as they completed a task that tested their cognitive flexibility. The researchers found that both groups performed the task accurately. However, bilingual seniors were faster at completing the task than their monolingual peers despite expending less energy in the frontal cortex -- an area known to be involved in task switching.


more...
Alexandra Strickland's curator insight, September 12, 2013 7:13 AM

Fascinating insight into bilingualism and its impact on your life!

Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

How To Build Your Analytics Confidence | Analytics & Optimization

How To Build Your Analytics Confidence | Analytics & Optimization | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Do you know someone that is afraid of Analytics? Not afraid in the sense that if you open a dashboard the person will climb a chair and start screaming... I mean afraid as in the 3rd definition of Merriam-Webster: "having a dislike for something - afraid of hard work"

 

Over the years I noticed that people often ask questions without even checking their Analytics tool. The information is sometimes one click away, right after signing in. So how come they didn't find it? My assumption is that people are generally afraid of Analytics, they won't login and surf their reports looking for data and insights, like they probably do at YouTube or at Wikipedia. And this is probably a syntom of a lack of confidence.

 

A few weeks ago I watched the video below, a TED Talk by David Kelley, founder of legendary design firm IDEO and Professor at the Institue of Design at Stanford. The presentation provides interesting facts of life, psychological theories, business and life-changing experiences. And I believe it is very relevant for Analytics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Moving beyond Hadoop for big data needs

Hadoop and MapReduce have long been mainstays of the big data movement, but some companies now need new and faster ways to extract business value from massive -- and constantly growing -- datasets.

 

While many large organizations are still turning to the open source Hadoop big data framework, its creator, Google, and others have already moved on to newer technologies.

 

The Apache Hadoop platform is an open source version of the Google File System and Google MapReduce technology. It was developed by the search engine giant to manage and process huge volumes of data on commodity hardware.

 

It's been a core part of the processing technology used by Google to crawl and index the Web.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

BNA 2013 Festival of Neuroscience: Exploring and Celebrating Neuroscience

BNA 2013 Festival of Neuroscience: Exploring and Celebrating Neuroscience | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

The British Neuroscience Association's biennial meeting in 2013 will be a unique event. Eighteen learned societies with a neuroscience interest - both clinical and non-clinical - have contributed one or more symposia to the programme, creating a meeting with 56 scientific sessions and 8 plenary lectures involving more than 240 speakers, over 80 from outside the U.K.

The hottest topics in neuroscience research will be covered, and we expect over 1000 poster presentations representing all aspects of the subject.

As the venue for the BNA2013 meeting is the Barbican Centre - one of London's leading entertainment venues - a major public engagement programme will form part of the Festival of Neuroscience - enabling members of the public to interact with scientists, carers, charities, funders, policy-makers...and some well-known celebrities with experience of mental health issues...to learn more about the brain and the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach to research.

Ashish Umre's insight:

Dates: 7th - 10th April 2013

The Barbican Centre, London, UK.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Swype Living Language uses crowdsourcing to add new words

Swype Living Language uses crowdsourcing to add new words | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
A new version of Swype is out and this one has a new feature which  Nuance Communications, the people behind Dragon Dictate and Swype, called Living Language. Swype Living Language uses crowdsourcing to find new trending words and adds them to the keyboard’s dictionary.

 

Crowdsourcing, in this context, means that as other users add words to their personal dictionaries the data is sent to Swype’s servers and popular and trending words are automatically pushed out to other users. You need to specifically opt into the service by going to Swype settings and tapping on Language Options. Tap Living language to activate the crowdsourcing. Nuance hope that this new feature will make the keyboard’s predictive results better allowing users to speed up their input.

 

Also new in this version is a feature called Smart Editor. It analyzes the last entered sentence and highlights any potential errors, along with suggestions, to enable you to fix the text quickly. I tapped “Gong home now” into a text message and Swype correctly underlined Gong and suggested Going. Neat!

more...
No comment yet.