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Dynamics of Social Interaction
Curated by Ashish Umre
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digitalStadium app: Digital Stadium technology trialled by Albion fans

digitalStadium app: Digital Stadium technology trialled by Albion fans | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

A trial of the digitalStadium app, which connects football fans' phones to create a network without the need for infrastructure WiFi, took place last night (May 13th), at Brighton & Hove Albion's final home game of the season.

 

 

Many football clubs want to develop better contact with fans during matches using digital technology, but the cost of equipping a stadium with the necessary WiFi infrastructure can be prohibitive (around £400,000).

 

 

The steel and concrete structures so typical of modern stadium design also make it difficult for smartphone users to get a signal. Anyone who’s tried to email or make a call on a smartphone when at a festival or match will know how difficult it is to get connected when there are thousands of other phones in use all around.

 

 

What makes the digitalStadium app unique, however, is the software solution that supports the app. Designed by Dr Ian Wakeman and Dr Dan Chalmers and their team at the University of Sussex in collaboration with Brighton and Hove Albion FC and Corridor Design, Digital Stadium software enables smart phones to act as mobile computers and build networks with other phones in the crowd.

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50 Top Sources Of Free eLearning Courses

50 Top Sources Of Free eLearning Courses | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Whether you are looking for a master’s degree program, computer science classes, a K-12 curriculum, or GED study program, this list gives you50 Top Sources Of Free eLearning Courses - 


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Big Data: When Cars Can Talk

The roads would be safer if cars could exchange information about traffic conditions and bad drivers. But are we ready to sacrifice privacy to save lives?

 

Has this ever happened to you? You're cruising down the highway, moving with the flow, when a lane-splitting motorcyclist suddenly zips past, nearly sideswiping you at 90 mph. Situations like these too often result in traffic accidents. And the daredevil cyclist isn't the only road hazard out there. We've all encountered the distracted texter, the inebriated weaver -- maybe even the wild-eyed suspect in a police car chase.

 

Wouldn't it be nice to get a heads-up when bad drivers are approaching? An early-warning system that gives you enough time to take defensive action?

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Bill Aukett's curator insight, June 19, 2013 8:11 PM

While road systems are merely complicated, the activity of driving is complex as is traffic flow. 

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GraphMasters Workshop

The GraphMasters workshops is a series of informal meetings of small groups of researchers working on various recent developments and open problems in Graph Theory. A particular GraphMasters meeting is usually concerned with just a small number of related open problems. The workshop is by invitation only. The first meeting of the GraphMasters series occurred in ITB Bandung, Indonesia on 18th - 19th December, 2010. Subsequent GraphMasters meetings are listed below.

 

If you are interested in hosting a GraphMasters gathering, please contact the Chair of the Steering Committee, Professor Mirka Miller, at the address given at the bottom of this page.

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Didier Sornette: How we can predict the next financial crisis

The 2007-2008 financial crisis, you might think, was an unpredictable one-time crash. But Didier Sornette and his Financial Crisis Observatory have plotted a set of early warning signs for unstable, growing systems, tracking the moment when any bubble is about to pop. (And he's seeing it happen again, right now.)


Via Complexity Digest
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Bernard Ryefield's curator insight, June 17, 2013 4:14 PM

 

Didier Sornette theory of Dragon-Kings vs Black Swans is supported by a number of concepts from complexity science and certainly needs close scrutinity.

 

The Illusion of the Perpetual Money Machine

D. Sornette, P. Cauwels

http://arxiv.org/abs/1212.2833

 

Dragon Kings, Black Swans and the Prediction of Crises

Didier Sornette

http://arxiv.org/abs/0907.4290

 

Predictability and suppression of extreme events in complex systems

Hugo L. D. de Souza Cavalcante, Marcos Oria, Didier Sornette, Edward Ott, Daniel J. Gauthier

http://arxiv.org/abs/1301.0244

 

Luciano Lampi's curator insight, June 18, 2013 3:30 PM

si non é vero...é ben trovato!

ComplexInsight's curator insight, June 24, 2013 3:05 AM

Didier Sornette and team's work .- highlights role of how system feedback can drive a variety of systems through phase transition resulting in dramatic structural and behavioural change in system behaviour.  While many of the underpinning ideas presented have been discussed extensively in the fields of chaos and complex systems - his teams methods of  analysis and publication combined with the variety of systems he and his team study will hopefully help gain a wider acceptance of using these methods to understand, model and steer systems behaviour. A video well worth watching.

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Prism: Yahoo reveals US data requests

Prism: Yahoo reveals US data requests | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Yahoo is the latest company to reveal its dealings with the US authorities, following revelations about the Prism surveillance programme.

 

It said it had received between 12,000 and 13,000 US government requests for user data in the past year and a half.

 

Most of them had "concerned fraud, homicides, kidnappings, and other criminal investigations", it said.

 

Yahoo voiced frustration that it was unable to reveal the number of requests that had concerned national security.

 

It urged the government to "reconsider its stance on this issue".

"Like all companies, Yahoo cannot lawfully break out Fisa [Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act] request numbers at this time because those numbers are classified," it said in a blog post by chief executive Marissa Mayer and general counsel Ron Bell.

 

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Second Order Swarm Intelligence

An artificial Ant Colony System (ACS) algorithm to solve general-purpose combinatorial Optimization Problems (COP) that extends previous AC models [21] by the inclusion of a negative pheromone, is here described. Several Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP) were used as benchmark. We show that by using two different sets of pheromones, a second-order co-evolved compromise between positive and negative feedbacks achieves better results than single positive feedback systems. The algorithm was tested against known NP-complete combinatorial Optimization Problems, running on symmetrical TSP's. We show that the new algorithm compares favourably against these benchmarks, accordingly to recent biological findings by Robinson [26,27], and Gruter [28] where "No entry" signals and negative feedback allows a colony to quickly reallocate the majority of its foragers to superior food patches. This is the first time an extended ACS algorithm is implemented with these successful characteristics.

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The Deepest Uncertainty: When a hypothesis is neither true nor false.

The Deepest Uncertainty: When a hypothesis is neither true nor false. | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Georg Cantor died in 1918 in a sanatorium in Halle, Germany. A pre-eminent mathematician, he had laid the foundation for the theory of infinite numbers in the 1870s. At the time, his ideas received hostile opposition from prominent mathematicians in Europe, chief among them Leopold Kronecker, once Cantor’s teacher. In his first known bout of depression, Cantor wrote 52 letters to the Swedish mathematician Gösta Mittag-Leffler, each of which mentioned Kronecker.

 

But it was not just rejection by Kronecker that pushed Cantor to depression; it was his inability to prove a particular mathematical conjecture he formulated in 1878, and was convinced was true, called the Continuum Hypothesis. But if he blamed himself, he did so needlessly. The debate over the conjecture is profoundly uncertain: in 1940 Kurt Gödel proved that the Continuum Hypothesis cannot be disproven, and in 1963 Paul Cohen proved that it cannot be proven. Poor Cantor had chosen quite the mast to lash himself to.

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Parenthood, the Great Moral Gamble - The decision to have a child is more ethically uncertain than you might realize.

Parenthood, the Great Moral Gamble - The decision to have a child is more ethically uncertain than you might realize. | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

I didn’t choose to have a child. Not if “choosing” means something rational—weighing pros and cons, coming to a conclusion. I tried that process but ran away from it because, even though I wanted a child, it seemed to me that creating a whole new person was such an enormity that no one could rationally decide to do such a thing. There is so much at stake, and so little certainty about the outcome. A child that I conceived might be happy, but he might be miserable beyond endurance. The child might bring happiness to others, or he might ruin people’s lives. It seemed to me that creating life was an act of astonishing hubris because it made me responsible, maybe morally responsible, for huge consequences. For most of our species’ history, we were spared that decision because procreation was not (for the most part) a choice, but merely something that happened to us. It was a biological destiny. We escaped that destiny when science gave us control over our fertility. But I wasn’t equal to the freedom that science gave me. Fearful of such an immense decision amid such uncertainty, I allowed myself to drift into parenthood instead of choosing it. I let other people’s expectations, the sheer normality of having children, construct a new, sociological destiny for me to replace the biological one and protect me from what seemed an impossible choice.

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Roach-Net Radio - The son of the cyborg moth is a radio-equipped cockroach

Roach-Net Radio - The son of the cyborg moth is a radio-equipped cockroach | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

You’re pinned under the rubble of a collapsed building. Hundreds of roaches scuttle toward you, but you’re unable to move. You can only watch as a great brown swarm closes in. But there’s something different about this approaching army of bugs. Each one hefts a coin-size sensor that’s glued to its back. The troop of roaches has been sent to rescue you.

 

That’s the scenario a team of Purdue University engineers has been working toward. This week at the Symposia on VLSI Technology and Circuits, in Japan, the group unveiled a new high-sensitivity, low-power wireless transceiver meant for insect-based wireless sensor networks. The transceiver can link to a variety of sensors. The researchers have already tested the technology using microphones, but it’s compatible with all sorts of other sensors as well, including those used for heat, light, position, acceleration, vibration, weight, pressure, humidity, and more.

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Can Life Evolve from Wires and Plastic?

Can Life Evolve from Wires and Plastic? | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

In a laboratory tucked away in a corner of the Cornell University campus, Hod Lipson’s robots are evolving. He has already produced a self-aware robot that is able to gather information about itself as it learns to walk. Like a Toy Story character, it sits in a cubby surrounded by other former laboratory stars.

 

There’s a set of modular cubes, looking like a cross between children’s blocks and the model cartilage one might see at the orthopedist’s—this particular contraption was one of the world’s first self-replicating robots. And there are cubbies full of odd-shaped plastic sculptures.

 

The robots and the 3D printer-pieces populating the cubbies are like fossils tracing the evolutionary history of a new kind of organism. ‘I want to evolve something that is life,’ Lipson told me, ‘out of plastic and wires and inanimate materials.’

 

Upon first meeting, Lipson comes off like a cross between Seth Rogen and Gene Wilder’s Young Frankenstein (minus the wild blond hair). You can’t miss his passionate desire to understand what makes life tick. And yet, as he seeks to create a self-assembling, self-aware machine that can walk right out of his laboratory, Lipson is aware of the risks:

 

‘As much as we are control freaks when it comes to engineering, where this is going toward is loss of control. The more we automate, the more we don’t know what’s going to come out of it.’

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Bill Aukett's curator insight, June 15, 2013 9:56 PM

Fascination account. Poses interesting philosophical questions about awareness, consciousness and evolutionary ethics. eg Can a machine be self aware?

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Fluctuation-Driven Flocking Movement in Three Dimensions and Scale-Free Correlation

Fluctuation-Driven Flocking Movement in Three Dimensions and Scale-Free Correlation | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Recent advances in the study of flocking behavior have permitted more sophisticated analyses than previously possible. The concepts of “topological distances” and “scale-free correlations” are important developments that have contributed to this improvement. These concepts require us to reconsider the notion of a neighborhood when applied to theoretical models. Previous work has assumed that individuals interact with neighbors within a certain radius (called the “metric distance”). However, other work has shown that, assuming topological interactions, starlings interact on average with the six or seven nearest neighbors within a flock. Accounting for this observation, we previously proposed a metric-topological interaction model in two dimensions. The goal of our model was to unite these two interaction components, the metric distance and the topological distance, into one rule. In our previous study, we demonstrated that the metric-topological interaction model could explain a real bird flocking phenomenon called scale-free correlation, which was first reported by Cavagna et al. In this study, we extended our model to three dimensions while also accounting for variations in speed. This three-dimensional metric-topological interaction model displayed scale-free correlation for velocity and orientation. Finally, we introduced an additional new feature of the model, namely, that a flock can store and release its fluctuations.

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Discrete Dynamics Lab, June 2013 update

Discrete Dynamics Lab, June 2013 update | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Network (and jump) graph nodes contract down to 1 pixel -- improving the scolling tube for large 1d networks, improvements to enlarged DDLab window layout, load/save ascii seed files.
The Derrida plot (described in EDD#22) is usually applied as an order-chaos measure for large RBN in the context of models of genetic regulatory networks, but it also provides Liapunov-like insights into CA rules. New options allow automatic plots of sets of rules in ascending decimal order, filtering out equivalent binary rcode and tcode, and listing equivalence classes and rule clusters.

For Null Boundary Conditions, inputs beyond the network's edges are held at a constant value of zero. All DDLab functions can now be easily switched between Periodic and Null. Null boundaries are of interest in pattern recognition, and where the system is grounded or quenched, or bounded by an edge, skin or membrane.
The new 2d hex/triangular neighborhoods for k3 and k4 permit investigating the dynamics on these simpler lattices, with many instances of complexity.

 

http://www.ddlab.com


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700 Free Online Courses from Top Universities

700 Free Online Courses from Top Universities | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Get free online courses from the world’s leading universities. This collection includes over 700 free courses in the liberal arts and sciences. Download these audio & video courses straight to your computer or mp3 player. Note: you can find a new collection of certificate-bearing courses  here.

 

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Short Course on Complexity: Exploring Complex Networks

Short Course on Complexity: Exploring Complex Networks | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

September 4-6, 2013
Austin, Texas

http://www.santafe.edu/education/schools/short-course-complexity/

 

This two-and-a-half day introductory course focuses on the science of networks: a new field that studies common principles of complex networks across disciplines. Social and economic networks, food webs, the World Wide Web, and the power grid are examples of the kinds of systems that network science seeks to understand. In this course, taught by prominent Santa Fe Institute faculty and associates, you will learn the basic concepts and tools of this new science, and see several case studies of their application in diverse areas. You will also have the opportunity for discussion with the faculty and other participants about applications within your own areas of interest. You will come away with an understanding and appreciation of the importance of network science for biology, ecology, economics, business, human health, social life, and other pursuits.


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Google to use balloons to provide free Internet access to remote or poor areas

Google has a truly sky-high idea for connecting billions of people to the Internet — 12 miles in the air to be exact — through giant helium balloons circling the globe that are equipped to beam WiFi signals below.

 

Google will announce Saturday it has 30 balloons floating over New Zealand to provide free Internet access to disaster-stricken, rural or poor areas. Eventually, as the balloons move across the stratosphere, consumers in participating countries along the 40th parallel in the Southern Hemisphere could tap into the service.

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Tianhe-2, the new Chinese supercomputer takes the lead and clocks in at 33.86 petaflops to break speed record

Tianhe-2, the new Chinese supercomputer takes the lead and clocks in at 33.86 petaflops to break speed record | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

A Chinese supercomputer known as Tianhe-2 was today named the world's fastest machine, nearly doubling the previous speed record with its performance of 33.86 petaflops. Tianhe-2's ascendance was revealed in advance and was made official today with the release of the new Top 500 supercomputer list.

 

Tianhe-2 was developed at China's National University of Defense Technology and will be deployed in the country's National Supercomputing Center before the end of this year. "The surprise appearance of Tianhe-2, two years ahead of the expected deployment, marks China’s first return to the No. 1 position since November 2010, when Tianhe-1A was the top system," the Top 500 announcement states. "Tianhe-2 has 16,000 nodes, each with two Intel Xeon Ivy Bridge processors and three Xeon Phi processors for a combined total of 3,120,000 computing cores."

 

The combined performance of the 500 systems on the list is 223 petaflops, up from 162 petaflops in the previous list released six months ago. A petaflop represents one quadrillion floating point operations per second, or a million billion.

 

26 systems hit at least a petaflop. IBM's Blue Gene/Q accounted for four of the top 10, while Intel provided the processors for 80.4 percent of all Top 500 systems. 39 systems use Nvidia GPUs to speed up calculations, and another 15 use other accelerator or co-processor technology such as AMD's ATI Radeon and Intel's Xeon Phi.

 

252 of the 500 are installed in the US, 112 are in Europe, 66 are in China, and 30 are in Japan. The slowest computer on the list hit 96.6 teraflops, compared to 76.5 teraflops for the slowest computer on last November's list.

 

Besides Tianhe-2, the only new entrant in the top ten is a Blue Gene/Q system named Vulcan at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Miro Svetlik's curator insight, June 18, 2013 4:01 AM

Hmm so chinese guys have dropped their famed own cpus and are now buying from intel ;). 33.86 petaflops is not bad however in the last article I have read they were claiming something around having 50+ petaflops so I assume this is a temporary figure (http://nextbigfuture.com/2013/06/china-tianhe-2-supercomputer-based-on.html

Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, June 24, 2013 6:35 AM

Open a trading account Download MT4 demo Download Trading Platform Get a Quotation NOW About Investors Europe

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Symmetry breaking in optimal timing of traffic signals on an idealized two-way street

Simple physical models based on fluid mechanics have long been used to understand the flow of vehicular traffic on freeways; analytically tractable models of flow on an urban grid, however, have not been as extensively explored. In an ideal world, traffic signals would be timed such that consecutive lights turned green just as vehicles arrived, eliminating the need to stop at each block. Unfortunately, this "green wave" scenario is generally unworkable due to frustration imposed by competing demands of traffic moving in different directions. Until now this has typically been resolved by numerical simulation and optimization. Here, we develop a theory for the flow in an idealized system consisting of a long two-way road with periodic intersections. We show that optimal signal timing can be understood analytically and that there are counter-intuitive asymmetric solutions to this signal coordination problem. We further explore how these theoretical solutions degrade as traffic conditions vary and automotive density increases.

 

Symmetry breaking in optimal timing of traffic signals on an idealized two-way street

Mark J Panaggio, Bertrand J Ottino-Löffler, Peiguang Hu, Daniel M Abrams

http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.2366


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The Avatar Will See You Now: Medical Centers Are Testing New, Friendly Ways To Reduce Office Visits

The Avatar Will See You Now: Medical Centers Are Testing New, Friendly Ways To Reduce Office Visits | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Most patients who enter the gym of the San Mateo Medical Center in California are there to work with physical therapists. But a few who had knee replacements are being coached by a digital avatar instead.

 

The avatar, Molly, interviews them in Spanish or English about the levels of pain they feel as a video guides them through exercises, while the 3-D cameras of a Kinect device measure their movements. Because it’s a pilot project, Paul Carlisle, the director of rehabilitation services, looks on. But the ultimate goal is for the routine to be done from a patient’s home.

 

“It would change our whole model,” says Carlisle, who is running the trial as the public hospital looks for creative ways to extend the reach of its overtaxed budget and staff. “We don’t want to replace therapists. But in some ways, it does replace the need to have them there all the time.”

 

Receiving remote medical care is becoming more common as technologies improve and health records get digitized. Sense.ly, the California startup running the trial, is one of more than 500 companies using health-care tools fromNuance, a company that develops speech-recognition and virtual-assistant software. “Our goal is basically to capture the patient’s state of mind and body,” says Ivana Schnur, cofounder of Sense.ly and a clinical psychologist who has spent years developing virtual-reality tools in medicine and mental health.

 

Using Sense.ly’s platform, patients can communicate their condition to an emotionally reactive avatar through their phone, desktop, or TV. The avatar asks the patient simple questions, and if programmed by a doctor, it can answer questions too—such as what a diabetes patient with high blood-sugar readings should eat that day. The software also collects data from other medical devices that a patient uses, such as a glucose meter, and can capture gestures with a Kinect. The reports sent to the doctor include red-flag notifications to act on right away; charts, graphs, and analytics tracing the patient’s progress over time; and a transcript of the voice interaction.

 

“A physician’s time is always limited,” says Benjamin Kanter, chief medical information officer at Palomar Health in San Diego. “For a long time, we’ve had the challenge of just getting information into the system. Now the system is starting to actually help me.”

 

Schnur says one real advance is the avatar itself, which is important in helping both patients and doctors to trust the interactions. Molly, still a work in progress, can modulate her tone of voice and facial expressions. Schnur says that sometimes patients are more willing to share sensitive information with a nonjudgmental avatar than with a doctor.

 

Patients in San Mateo seem to like the interaction, Carlisle says, and he does too: “I’ve gotten used to the avatar. I look forward to seeing it when it comes online.”

 

The Sense.ly software, currently in beta, is also being tested at an addiction and detox clinic in California, doing patient intake and assessment in a crowded waiting room. Schnur hopes the system will eventually be used for even more complex tasks. The company, a product of the French telecommunication company Orange’s Silicon Valley incubator program, is working to include additional features, such as the ability to interpret and respond to a patient’s facial expressions.

 

Of course, doctors see some risks in such approaches, especially if the software makes an error or misinterprets an interaction. Kanter points out that although electronic systems often reduce errors, any errors that occur can propagate more quickly than those made only on paper.

 

Carlisle, who will enroll 50 to 60 patients by the time the study is done, is looking forward to getting more data. Over time, he hopes, not only will he improve the care of individual patients in their home environments, but what he learns from the data will improve therapy for everyone.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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A Universe Made of Tiny, Random Chunks: A new idea holds that the space-time that makes up our universe is inherently uncertain.

A Universe Made of Tiny, Random Chunks: A new idea holds that the space-time that makes up our universe is inherently uncertain. | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

One of science’s most crucial yet underappreciated achievements is the description of the physical universe using mathematics—in particular, using continuous, smooth mathematical functions, like how a sine wave describes both light and sound. This is sometimes known as Newton’s zeroth law of motion in recognition of the fact that his famed three laws embody such functions.

 

In the early 20th century, Albert Einstein gave a profound jolt to the Newtonian universe, showing that space was both curved by mass and inherently linked to time. He called the new concept space-time. While this idea was shocking, its equations were smooth and continuous, like Newton’s.

 

But some recent findings from a small number of researchers suggest that randomness is actually inherent in space-time itself, and that Newton’s zeroth law also breaks down, on small scales.

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Fooled By Your Own Brain: Don’t be so certain your senses are telling you the truth.

Fooled By Your Own Brain: Don’t be so certain your senses are telling you the truth. | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Your powers of attention: fooled!

 

Attention is, by definition, limited. And that’s usually a good thing. If you’re searching for a lost earring on the floor, you want to ignore anything that’s not small and shiny. When talking to someone at a party, your mind helpfully tunes out all of the other voices prattling on around you.


Sometimes, though, our exquisite attentional machinery can give us a warped version of reality.

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The Coin Toss and the Love Triangle - Information Theory: There are two flavors of uncertainty in our lives. Math helps with both.

The Coin Toss and the Love Triangle - Information Theory: There are two flavors of uncertainty in our lives. Math helps with both. | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Chance appears to name a single, unitary thing. But its genealogy, its family history, turns out to be a tangled one. One way to understand its branching origins is to turn to literature: We may look, in turn, to two very different novels.

 

Anton Chigurh, the antagonist of Cormac McCarthy’s novel No Country for Old Men, forces his victims to guess the outcome of a coin toss, taking their life if they guess in error. McCarthy’s villain forces blind chance into his victims’ lives in the most brutal way. That chance is entirely contained, not in Chigurh, but in the toss—in nature itself. This is one source of uncertainty.

 

To understand the second source, we travel as far as possible from McCarthy’s American Southwest. The first volume of Henry James’s The Wings of the Dove ends with Milly Theale, a wealthy American heiress, visiting the National Gallery in London. To her surprise she sees an acquaintance, Merton Densher, in the company of her best friend, Kate Croy. The plot of the book from this point forward hinges on a single question: will Milly learn what the reader already knows—that Merton and

Kate are in love and secretly engaged to be married.

 

In the sequence, told from Milly’s point of view, we see how Kate—caught sharing an intimate afternoon—acts in such a way as to generate an alternate hypothesis for her friend: that Merton may well be keen on her, but that she, Kate, is not keen on him.

 

Here are uncertainties not otherwise found in nature: probabilities about probabilities, beliefs about beliefs held by others.

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Debra Cannon's curator insight, June 16, 2013 11:54 AM

Interdisciplinary excursion...

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Context Aware Computing Market- How Context Awareness is Making Your Gadgets Smarter

Context awareness works in complementary manner to location awareness. Location awareness is all about determining the processes and operation of various devices. Context awareness is a sort of pervasive computing, which is available in smart phones. It offers great flexibility to the mobile users, making mobile usage a swift and intriguing experience. Context aware computing provides information, technologies and applications, which are personalized as per the requirements of the users. These requirements include location, social context, proximity to other devices and objects, environmental factors and activity level. Context-triggering actions are easy to perform on mobiles and other computing devices that use context to enhance the end user experience.

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Derek IAnson's curator insight, June 15, 2013 2:50 PM

Every day new electronic products are coming out on the market. These are ideal for the person who loves gadgets and likes to try new things. For someone hard to buy for, find a new gadget and get it before anyone else. They’ll love being among the firsts to have it!

 

Computer programming makes use of a code or a language: this language can be placed into several lines of code that can be translated to mean different things once they are processed as a program. For instance, the software that you use to calculate your taxes, or the software that you employ to make your simple web page are all products of skilful computer programming.

 

visit my website for all electronic gadgets:http://gadgets4today.weebly.com/




Bill Aukett's curator insight, June 15, 2013 9:51 PM

If the relationship between technology and complexity is of interest, check this out

 

http://on.ted.com/Quadcopter

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Can six billion cells phones collecting data on how people move lead to better human health?

Can six billion cells phones collecting data on how people move lead to better human health? | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Collecting and analyzing information from simple cell phones can provide surprising insights into how people move about and behave—and even help us understand the spread of diseases.

 

At a computer in her office at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, epidemiologist Caroline Buckee points to a dot on a map of Kenya’s western highlands, representing one of the nation’s thousands of cell-phone towers. In the fight against malaria, Buckee explains, the data transmitted from this tower near the town of Kericho has been epidemiological gold.

 

When she and her colleagues studied the data, she found that people making calls or sending text messages originating at the Kericho tower were making 16 times more trips away from the area than the regional average. What’s more, they were three times more likely to visit a region northeast of Lake Victoria that records from the health ministry identified as a malaria hot spot. The tower’s signal radius thus covered a significant waypoint for transmission of malaria, which can jump from human to human via mosquitoes. Satellite images revealed the likely culprit: a busy tea plantation that was probably full of migrant workers. The implication was clear, Buckee says. “There will be a ton of infected [people] there.”

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Using the quaternion's representation of individuals in swarm intelligence and evolutionary computation

This paper introduces a novel idea for representation of individuals using quaternions in swarm intelligence and evolutionary algorithms. Quaternions are a number system, which extends complex numbers. They are successfully applied to problems of theoretical physics and to those areas needing fast rotation calculations. We propose the application of quaternions in optimization, more precisely, we have been using quaternions for representation of individuals in Bat algorithm. The preliminary results of our experiments when optimizing a test-suite consisting of ten standard functions showed that this new algorithm significantly improved the results of the original Bat algorithm. Moreover, the obtained results are comparable with other swarm intelligence and evolutionary algorithms, like the artificial bees colony, and differential evolution. We believe that this representation could also be successfully applied to other swarm intelligence and evolutionary algorithms.

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