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Social Foraging
Dynamics of Social Interaction
Curated by Ashish Umre
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Interface-Resolved Network of Protein-Protein Interactions

Interface-Resolved Network of Protein-Protein Interactions | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

We define an interface-interaction network (IIN) to capture the specificity and competition between protein-protein interactions (PPI). This new type of network represents interactions between individual interfaces used in functional protein binding and thereby contains the detail necessary to describe the competition and cooperation between any pair of binding partners. Here we establish a general framework for the construction of IINs that merges computational structure-based interface assignment with careful curation of available literature. To complement limited structural data, the inclusion of biochemical data is critical for achieving the accuracy and completeness necessary to analyze the specificity and competition between the protein interactions. Firstly, this procedure provides a means to clarify the information content of existing data on purported protein interactions and to remove indirect and spurious interactions. Secondly, the IIN we have constructed here for proteins involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) exhibits distinctive topological properties. In contrast to PPI networks with their global and relatively dense connectivity, the fragmentation of the IIN into distinctive network modules suggests that different functional pressures act on the evolution of its topology. Large modules in the IIN are formed by interfaces sharing specificity for certain domain types, such as SH3 domains distributed across different proteins. The shared and distinct specificity of an interface is necessary for effective negative and positive design of highly selective binding targets. Lastly, the organization of detailed structural data in a network format allows one to identify pathways of specific binding interactions and thereby predict effects of mutations at specific surfaces on a protein and of specific binding inhibitors, as we explore in several examples. Overall, the endocytosis IIN is remarkably complex and rich in features masked in the coarser PPI, and collects relevant detail of protein association in a readily interpretable format.

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Digitalisation of Education will Result in Fifteen fold Growth for e-Learning Market over the next decade

Digitalisation of Education will Result in Fifteen fold Growth for e-Learning Market over the next decade | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Industry research into the parallels between the education and media industries conducted by specialist media investment and advisory firm IBIS Capital and Edxus Group, an education technology company established to develop and acquire e-learning businesses, has revealed enormous potential for the future of the e-learning market. While education as a whole is triple the size of the media and entertainment industry at $4.2 trillion, digital education is currently only 20% of the size of the digital media market. Since education is undergoing the same disruptive effects of digitalisation that the media industry has seen in recent years, IBIS Capital and Edxus Group expect to see fifteen fold growth in the e-learning market in the next 10 years to represent 30% of the total education market. In addition, if private funding becomes more widely available to support innovation and consolidation in the sector and historical impediments to the development of digital education are diminished, the transition to digital education will be even quicker and more disruptive than that observed in the media industry over the past decade.
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Ashish Umre's comment, January 28, 2014 12:52 PM
Hi Julia, Thanks for the link. I am based in the UK, and this meetup is a rather long way away. Hopefully, there will be one organised closer to the UK.
Ashish Umre's comment, January 28, 2014 1:11 PM
Ofcourse, I didn't get that bit at first glance. I have now registered. Thanks again!
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Why the free market is like quantum mechanics (and both are unrealistic constructs)

Why the free market is like quantum mechanics (and both are unrealistic constructs) | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

If we were omniscient and had infinitely fast and perfect computers, perhaps we could use quantum mechanics to explain chemistry, biology, economics and psychology. In reality, no amount of quantum mechanical theorizing can explain how molecular aggregates coalesce to give rise to self-replicating assemblies, let alone how these assemblies acquire the capacity for consciousness, introspection and purposeful action.

 

Now imagine someone who has started out with the honest and admirable goal of trying to apply quantum mechanics to understand the behavior of a “simple” biological system like a protein. He knows for a fact that quantum mechanics canaccount for (not explain) all of chemistry- the great physicist Paul Dirac himself said that. He has complete confidence that quantum mechanics is really the best way to get the most accurate estimates of thermodynamic free energy, solubility, molecular charges and a variety of other important chemical properties for his favorite protein.

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Privacy protections: The genome hacker

Privacy protections: The genome hacker | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Yaniv Erlich shows how research participants can be identified from 'anonymous' DNA.

 

Late at night, a video camera captures a man striding up to the locked door of the information-technology department of a major Israeli bank. At this hour, access can be granted only by a fingerprint reader — but instead of using the machine, the man pushes a button on the intercom to ring the receptionist's phone. As it rings, he holds his mobile phone up to the intercom and presses the number 8. The sound of the keypad tone is enough to unlock the door. As he opens it, the man looks back to the camera with a shrug: that was easy.

 

Yaniv Erlich — the star of this 2006 video — considers this one of his favourite hacks. Technically a “penetration exercise” conducted to expose the bank's vulnerabilities, it was one of several projects that Erlich worked on during a two-year stint with a security firm based near Tel Aviv. Since then, the 33-year-old computational biologist has been bringing his hacker ethos to biology. Now at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts, he is using genome data in new ways, and in the process exposing vulnerabilities in databases that hold sensitive information on thousands of individuals around the world.

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Johan Bollen. Modeling collective mood states from large-scale social media data.

ECCO/GBI seminar winter 2012-2013
Modeling collective mood states from large-scale social media data
December 17, 2012 Brussels, VUB

Johan Bollen
Associate Professor,
School of Informatics and Computing,
Indiana University

Abstract and more info: http://ecco.vub.ac.be/?q=node/199


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Temporal Networks

Temporal Networks | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

The concept of temporal networks is an extension of complex networks as a modeling framework to include information on when interactions between nodes happen.
Many studies of the last decade examine how the static network structure affect dynamic systems on the network. In this traditional approach the temporal aspects are pre-encoded in the dynamic system model.
Temporal-network methods, on the other hand, lift the temporal information from the level of system dynamics to the mathematical representation of the contact network itself.
This framework becomes particularly useful for cases where there is a lot of structure and heterogeneity both in the timings of interaction events and the network topology.

 

Temporal Networks
Holme, Petter; Saramäki, Jari (Eds.)

http://t.co/DWnhXNIiXb

 


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Neuromarketing Meets Conversion Optimization: Free Webinar

Neuromarketing Meets Conversion Optimization: Free Webinar | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Next week, conversion optimization expert Chris Goward and I will be doing a joint webinar: Neuromarketing Meets Conversion Optimization: Brainy Profit Boosters.

 

I was excited to set this up with Chris, who’s the author of You Should Test That.


Testing is critical. In nearly every speech I give, I include a quote from ad legend David Ogilvy about “Test” being the most important word in advertising. Sadly, most marketers tend to trust their instinct or do things that worked for other people on other sites. Stuff that has been shown to work elsewhere is a great starting point for improving conversion, but there’s no guarantee that it will do the same thing on your site for your product. I’ve seen Chris present, and he always has great examples of test results that are the opposite of what most people expect.

 

Both Chris and I will be discussing research and testing that will surprise you as well as give you actionable strategies to improve your digital marketing.

 

Reserve your spot now (Free for the first 500 attendees)!

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Employment Growth through Labor Flow Networks

Employment Growth through Labor Flow Networks | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

It is conventional in labor economics to treat all workers who are seeking new jobs as belonging to a labor pool, and all firms that have job vacancies as an employer pool, and then match workers to jobs. Here we develop a new approach to study labor and firm dynamics. By combining the emerging science of networks with newly available employment micro-data, comprehensive at the level of whole countries, we are able to broadly characterize the process through which workers move between firms. Specifically, for each firm in an economy as a node in a graph, we draw edges between firms if a worker has migrated between them, possibly with a spell of unemployment in between. An economy's overall graph of firm-worker interactions is an object we call the labor flow network (LFN). This is the first study that characterizes a LFN for an entire economy. We explore the properties of this network, including its topology, its community structure, and its relationship to economic variables. It is shown that LFNs can be useful in identifying firms with high growth potential. We relate LFNs to other notions of high performance firms. Specifically, it is shown that fewer than 10% of firms account for nearly 90% of all employment growth. We conclude with a model in which empirically-salient LFNs emerge from the interaction of heterogeneous adaptive agents in a decentralized labor market.

 

Guerrero OA, Axtell RL (2013) Employment Growth through Labor Flow Networks. PLoS ONE 8(5): e60808. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0060808


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More Doodling Makes For Better Learning

More Doodling Makes For Better Learning | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Doodling is often seen as a sign of distraction. If you’re doodling, you’re not paying attention. If you’re drawing, you’re not taking notes. You’re not listening. You’re not learning.

 

But research published in the latest edition of the journal Science challenges the anti-doodling stance. It contends that not only can doodling help students learn, but that drawing is an important tool for scientific discovery.

 

The researchers — Shaaron Ainsworth, Vaughan Prain, and Russell Tytler — argue that scientists rely on visualizations in order to make sense of their observations and discoveries. Words alone — as notes or as longer explanation and analysis — aren’t enough. By extension then, creating drawings is important for all those engaged in scientific inquiry, whether they’re scientists or students.

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The Neuroscience At The Heart Of Learning And Leading

The Neuroscience At The Heart Of Learning And Leading | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Joshua Freedman (@eqjosh) shares the science behind what’s going on inside your head. Emotional intelligence, he says, is the difference that makes the difference.

 

Marco Iacoboni is one of the pioneers in a new area of neuroscience. A few years ago in Parma, Italy, scientists were researching how the brain controls our actions. They accidentally discovered a whole new class of brain cells that seem to be the neural basis of empathy. They called them “mirror neurons” because these cells seemed to map one person’s actions into another’s brain—a kind of imprinting that explains why role models and mentors can be such powerful influences. Since then, Iacoboni and others have found these special neurons in other areas of the brain, and their story has become even more fascinating.

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Robot Singularity: Artificial Intelligence Experts Debate Rise Of Smart Machines

Robot Singularity: Artificial Intelligence Experts Debate Rise Of Smart Machines | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Are you prepared to meet your robot overlords?

 

The idea of superintelligent machines may sound like the plot of "The Terminator" or "The Matrix," but many experts say the idea isn't far-fetched. Some even think the singularity — the point at which artificial intelligence can match, and then overtake, human smarts — might happen in just 16 years.

 

But nearly every computer scientist will have a different prediction for when and how the singularity will happen.

 

Some believe in a utopian future, in which humans can transcend their physical limitations with the aid of machines. But others think humans will eventually relinquish most of their abilities and gradually become absorbed into artificial intelligence (AI)-based organisms, much like the energy making machinery in our own cells. [5 Reasons to Fear Robots]

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School on Nonlinearity and Stochasticity in Emergent Phenomen July 29th - August 2nd, 2013

School on Nonlinearity and Stochasticity in Emergent Phenomena
July 29th - August 2nd, 2013
Centro Internacional de Ciencias A.C. Cuernavaca, Mexico.
http://www.cicc.unam.mx/activities/2013/snlsep/index.html

Lecturers
Rafael Barrio Instituto de Física, UNAM. Mexico
Carlos Gershenson Instituto de Investigación en Matemáticas Aplicadas y Sistemas, UNAM. Mexico
Holger Henning Harvard University. USA
David Hochberg Centro de Astrobiología, CSIC/INTA. Spain
Henrik Jensen Imperial College London. UK
María Elena Lárraga Instituto de Ingeniería, UNAM. Mexico

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The Bitcoin Arms Race Is On: Powerful mining machines are changing the nature of the popular cryptocurrency

The Bitcoin Arms Race Is On: Powerful mining machines are changing the nature of the popular cryptocurrency | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Bitcoin, the cryptocurrency powered by a decentralized peer-to-peer network of computers, has been hot this season. With the exchange rate bobbling around US $100, those involved in creating new bitcoins—and upholding the network that makes them valuable—have become locked in an arms race of sorts, seeking new, powerful machines that will enrich them but could also destabilize the nascent virtual money.

 

Bitcoins exist only as records on a virtual ledger that’s shared over a global peer-to-peer network, each node of which must agree to changes in the accounting—payments or receipt of payments. Arriving at this consensus takes massive amounts of computing power.

 

You can use your bitcoins even if you’re not plugged into the network that runs the operation, but there is a strong incentive to help out. At an average of once every 10 minutes, the software spits out a handful of newly minted bitcoins to one computer, as a kind of lottery payment to the people (referred to as “miners”) who run it. The way you enter this lottery is by solving “hashes,” trivial functions that reformulate meaningful data sets into unique strings of letters and numbers. Each time a computer completes a hash, it’s as if it has filled out another lottery ticket, choosing the numbers and hoping they match up. Only a specific hash will be accepted, and the first computer to find the right one gets the prize.

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unspy's curator insight, May 14, 2013 5:52 PM

Each time a computer completes a hash, it’s as if it has filled out another lottery ticket, choosing the numbers and hoping they match up. Only a specific hash will be accepted, and the first computer to find the right one gets the prize.

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Where Thomas Nagel Went Wrong: What drives the nonliving to living, the simple to complex, and the instinctual to intellectual?

Where Thomas Nagel Went Wrong: What drives the nonliving to living, the simple to complex, and the instinctual to intellectual? | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
The philosopher's critique of evolution wasn't shocking. So why have his colleagues raked him over the coals?

 

Thomas Nagel is a leading figure in philosophy, now enjoying the title of university professor at New York University, a testament to the scope and influence of his work. His 1974 essay "What Is It Like to Be a Bat?" has been read by legions of undergraduates, with its argument that the inner experience of a brain is truly knowable only to that brain. Since then he has published 11 books, on philosophy of mind, ethics, and epistemology.

 

But Nagel's academic golden years are less peaceful than he might have wished. His latest book, Mind and Cosmos (Oxford University Press, 2012), has been greeted by a storm of rebuttals, ripostes, and pure snark. "The shoddy reasoning of a once-great thinker," Steven Pinker tweeted. The Weekly Standard quoted the philosopher Daniel Dennett calling Nagel a member of a "retrograde gang" whose work "isn't worth anything—it's cute and it's clever and it's not worth a damn."

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Which came first: Farming or private property? Wrong question, suggests new paper

Which came first: Farming or private property? Wrong question, suggests new paper | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

It has long been assumed that the advent of farming 12 millennia ago led to the birth of what we now call private property rights. But new data on the productivity of early farming and hunting-gathering, along with new mathematical modeling by SFI researchers, tell a very different story.

 

In a paper appearing this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, SFI’s Sam Bowles and Kyungpook National University's Jung-Kyoo Choi show that farming, by itself, could not have driven property rights. Nor did property rights alone drive farming. Instead, it looks like farming and private property rights evolved shoulder-to-shoulder: each dependent on the other.

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First proof that infinitely many prime numbers come in pairs

First proof that infinitely many prime numbers come in pairs | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

It’s a result only a mathematician could love. Researchers hoping to get ‘2’ as the answer for a long-sought proof involving pairs of prime numbers are celebrating the fact that a mathematician has wrestled the value down from infinity to 70 million.

 

“That’s only [a factor of] 35 million away” from the target, quips Dan Goldston, an analytic number theorist at San Jose State University in California who was not involved in the work. “Every step down is a step towards the ultimate answer.”

 

That goal is the proof to a conjecture concerning prime numbers. Those are the whole numbers that are divisible only by one and themselves. Primes abound among smaller numbers, but they become less and less frequent as one goes towards larger numbers. In fact, the gap between each prime and the next becomes larger and larger — on average. But exceptions exist: the ‘twin primes’, which are pairs of prime numbers that differ in value by 2. Examples of known twin primes are 3 and 5, or 17 and 19, or 2,003,663,613 × 2195,000 − 1 and 2,003,663,613 × 2195,000 + 1.

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'Geography of Hate' maps racism and homophobia on Twitter

'Geography of Hate' maps racism and homophobia on Twitter | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Twitter, even more than many other social media tools, can feel disconnected from the real world. But a group of students and professors at research site Floating Sheep have built a comprehensive map of some of Twitter's most distasteful content: the racist, homophobic, or ableist slurs that can proliferate online. Called Geography of Hate, the interactive map charts ten relatively common slurs across the continental US, either by general category or individually. Looking at the whole country, you'll often see a mass of red or what the map's creators call a "blue smog of hate." Zooming in, however, patches appear over individual regions or cities; some may be predictable, while others are not.


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Networks in 2020: More traffic, less energy

The GreenTouch industry consortium says new technologies could cut power consumption by 90 percent

 

Networks could use far less energy by 2020 even though they'll be carrying much more traffic, an industry group says.

 

The GreenTouch consortium, formed in 2010 to speed up progress on more efficient networks, says it has identified technologies that together could cut network power needs by 90 percent even in the face of rapidly growing data demand. The group of equipment vendors, component makers and service providers will present that conclusion in a report due in mid-June.

 

"There is potential with these new technologies to support the traffic growth and still make the energy consumption go down," said Thierry Klein, chairman of GreenTouch's technical committee. Klein also leads green research at Alcatel-Lucent's Bell Labs division.

 

The tools that make this possible include new devices, components, algorithms, architectures and protocols, Klein said. All have been proved in labs, he said. The potential energy savings represents a comparison between a 2010 network with that year's traffic levels and a theoretical 2020 network with projections of traffic amounts for that year.

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What to do with 'big data' when we don't yet have a theory of complex systems

What to do with 'big data' when we don't yet have a theory of complex systems | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
As the world becomes increasingly complex and interconnected, some of our biggest challenges have begun to seem intractable. What should we do about uncertainty in the financial markets? How can we predict energy supply and demand? How will climate change play out? How do we cope with rapid urbanization? Our traditional approaches to these problems are often qualitative and disjointed and lead to unintended consequences. To bring scientific rigor to the challenges of our time, we need to develop a deeper understanding of complexity itself.
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Persuade with Visual Metaphors: Neuromarketing

Persuade with Visual Metaphors: Neuromarketing | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

While we think of metaphors as mainly word-based, visual metaphors can be a potent selling tool. They can both engage the brain like text metaphors and stimulate the viewer’s senses in a way that words alone may not.

 

I ran across an ad for Austin-based Elements Laser Spa that includes both a visual metaphor and a play on words. The ad shows a rose with its thorns removed, while its headline text reads, “Nice Stems.” (For international Neuromarketing readers, “stems” is slang for “legs.”)

 

This ad is brilliant in several ways. First, it produces an “aha!” reward to the viewer’s brain since most readers will understand the cryptic ad only when they look at the small print below. (The print version of this ad has a small box below the illustration that offers a discount on laser hair removal. The long-stemmed rose with the little pile of thorns won’t make sense at first, but upon seeing the text in the discount offer just about every viewer will immediately grasp what’s going on.

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Tyler Evans's curator insight, July 18, 2013 7:25 PM

Take a look at this advertisement (and accompanying article).  For Orwell, good writers can create fresh, enduring metaphors.  They don't rely on "stale metaphors."  Considering this idea, be sure to focus on the three qualities of metaphors, as presented in this article.  How does this literary concept translate in the world of visual art?

Laurene Franzon's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:51 PM

Neuromarketing par l'image

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On Brewing Fresh Espresso: LinkedIn's Distributed Data Serving Platform

This paper written by the LinkedIn Espresso Team, and the talk to be given by Lin Qiao, will appear at the ACM SIGMOD/PODS Conference (June 2013).

 

As LinkedIn has grown, our core data sets and request processing requirements have grown as well. The development of Espresso was motivated by our desire to migrate LinkedIn’s online serving infrastructure from monolithic, commercial, RDBMS systems running on high cost specialized hardware to elastic clusters of commodity servers running free software; and to improve agility by enabling rapid development by simplifying the programming model, separating scalability, routing, caching from business logic. Espresso is a document-oriented distributed data serving platform that has been built to address LinkedIn’s requirements for a scalable, performant, source-of-truth primary store. It provides a hierarchical document model, transactional support for modifications to related documents, real- time secondary indexing, on-the-fly schema evolution and provides a timeline consistent change capture stream. This talk describes the motivation and design principles involved in building Espresso, its architecture and presents a set of experimental results that characterize the performance of the system along various dimensions.

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Morals and Markets

The possibility that market interaction may erode moral values is a long-standing, but controversial, hypothesis in the social sciences, ethics, and philosophy. To date, empirical evidence on decay of moral values through market interaction has been scarce. We present controlled experimental evidence on how market interaction changes how human subjects value harm and damage done to third parties. In the experiment, subjects decide between either saving the life of a mouse or receiving money. We compare individual decisions to those made in a bilateral and a multilateral market. In both markets, the willingness to kill the mouse is substantially higher than in individual decisions. Furthermore, in the multilateral market, prices for life deteriorate tremendously. In contrast, for morally neutral consumption choices, differences between institutions are small.

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Neuroscience’s future: Mice with human brain cells

Neuroscience’s future: Mice with human brain cells | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Into brains of newborn mice, researchers implanted human “progenitor cells.” These mature into a type of brain cell called astrocytes (see below). They grew into human astrocytes, crowding out mouse astrocytes. The mouse brains became chimeras of human and mouse, with the workhorse mouse brain cells – neurons – nurtured by billions of human astrocytes.

 

Neuroscience is only beginning to discover what astrocytes do in brains. One job that is known is that they help neurons build connections (synapses) with other neurons. (Firing neurotransmitter molecules across synapses is how neurons communicate.) Human astrocytes are larger and more complex than those of other mammals. Humans’ unique brain capabilities may depend on this complexity.

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A Grand Unified Theory of Everything: Entropica (the Artificial Intelligence system)

A Grand Unified Theory of Everything: Entropica (the Artificial Intelligence system) | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Here’s a way to make a lot of money. Publish a speculative scientific article with equations nobody understands, put out a press release, throw in a few credentials (say, a degree from Harvard or M.I.T.), and get a few bloggers to spread the word. In the meantime, quietly start a company based on the idea—the grander, the better.

 

The latest example of the scientific hype machine is a paper that comes from Alexander Wissner-Gross, a research scientist and entrepreneur affiliated with Harvard and M.I.T. who, according to the bio on his Web site, has “authored 15 publications, been granted 19 issued, pending, and provisional patents, and founded, managed, and advised 5 technology companies, 1 of which has been acquired.” According to one report (by a well-respected science journalist), Wissner-Gross and his co-author, Cameron Freer, “have figured out a ‘law’ that enables inanimate objects to behave [in a way that] in effect allow[s] them to glimpse their own future. If they follow this law, they can show behavior reminiscent of some of the things humans do: for example, cooperating or using ‘tools’ to conduct a task.” A start-up called Entropica aims to capitalize on the discovery; the futurist Web site io9 and the BBC have both gushed about it.

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Consumer Culture, Children & Well-Being: Research, Implications, and Practice - Psychology Research @ Sussex University

On Friday 3rd May, 2013, the University of Sussex hosted a research dissemination event relating to the research of the Leverhulme funded project on ‘Consumer Culture and Children’s Well-being’, led by Dr Helga Dittmar and Professor Robin Banerjee. The event allowed the research team to share their exciting findings with interested professionals, and also identified ways of bridging the gap between academic research and applied areas of practice and policy.

 

The Children’s Consumer Culture Project has been gathering data for the past three years on the links between children’s engagement with and endorsement of consumer culture and their well-being, with measures incorporating physical health, subjective well-being, depression and body esteem. The conference aimed to share the research beyond the traditional academic community, and although we had numerous high profile academics, such as Tim Kasser, Agnes Nairn, and Greg Maio in attendance, we also had representatives from local schools, educational psychology services, clinical psychologists, and other service providers and policymakers .

 

The event was opened by an inspiring and vibrant speech from Caroline Lucas MP (Brighton Pavilion), who set the research project in a broader socio-political context.  She focused on three key points of policy, relating to:  a) advertising aimed at primary school-aged children; b) objectification of women in the media and the need for improved whole-school strategies concerning gender and relationships; and c) environmental impacts of consumption. Her thoughtful address provided the perfect introduction to the event, resonating with many of the issues that emerged as key parts of our discussion over the course of the day.

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