Social Foraging
Follow
Find
57.0K views | +30 today
 
Scooped by Ashish Umre
onto Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Advances in Neuroprosthetic Learning and Control

Advances in Neuroprosthetic Learning and Control | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Significant progress has occurred in the field of brain–machine interfaces (BMI) since the first demonstrations with rodents, monkeys, and humans controlling different prosthetic devices directly with neural activity. This technology holds great potential to aid large numbers of people with neurological disorders. However, despite this initial enthusiasm and the plethora of available robotic technologies, existing neural interfaces cannot as yet master the control of prosthetic, paralyzed, or otherwise disabled limbs. Here I briefly discuss recent advances from our laboratory into the neural basis of BMIs that should lead to better prosthetic control and clinically viable solutions, as well as new insights into the neurobiology of action.

more...
No comment yet.
Social Foraging
Dynamics of Social Interaction
Curated by Ashish Umre
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Scientists make droplets move on their own: Drops of alcohol that can find their way through a maze

Droplets are simple spheres of fluid, not normally considered capable of doing anything on their own. But now researchers have made droplets of alcohol move through water. In the future, such moving droplets may deliver medicines, etc. To be able to move on your own – to be self-moving – is a feature normally seen in living organisms. But also non-living entities can be self-moving, report researchers from University of Southern Denmark and Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Czech Republic.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Qualcomm Says Future Smartphones Will Have Built-In AI for Understanding Images and Faces

Qualcomm Says Future Smartphones Will Have Built-In AI for Understanding Images and Faces | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Future smartphones will be able to understand what you’re taking photos of and recognize faces, says mobile chip maker Qualcomm. Researchers at the company are working to make a powerful new approach to artificial intelligence known as deep learning a standard feature of mobile devices.

Smartphone camera apps often have “scene” modes to get the best shots of landscapes, sports, or sunsets. Qualcomm has created a camera app able to identify different types of scenes on its own, based on their visual characteristics. That could lead to phones that can choose their own settings without having to send or receive data over the Internet.

Charles Bergan, who leads software research at Qualcomm, demonstrated that software in a sponsored talk at MIT Technology Review’s EmTech conference last week in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He said that it should be possible to use the same approach to create software that could decide the best moment to take a photo. “Maybe it will detect that it’s a soccer game and look for that moment when the ball is just lifting off,” he said.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Exact solution for a metapopulation version of Schelling’s model

Exact solution for a metapopulation version of Schelling’s model | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
More than 40 y ago, Schelling introduced one of the first agent-based models in the social sciences. The model showed that even if people only have a mild preference for living with neighbors of the same color, complete segregation will occur. This model has been much discussed by social scientists and analyzed by physicists using analogies with spin-1 Ising models and other systems. Here, we study the metapopulation version of the model, which mimics the division of a city into neighborhoods, and we present the first analysis to our knowledge that gives detailed information about the structure of equilibria and explicit formulas for their densities.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashish Umre from Influence et contagion
Scoop.it!

Nicholas Christakis: The #Sociological Science Behind Social #Networks and Social #Influence | #SNA

If You're So Free, Why Do You Follow Others? The Sociological Science Behind Social Networks and Social Influence. Nicholas Christakis, Professor of Medical ...


Via luiy
more...
luiy's curator insight, September 28, 7:44 PM

If you think you're in complete control of your destiny or even your own actions, you're wrong. Every choice you make, every behavior you exhibit, and even every desire you have finds its roots in the social universe. Nicholas Christakis explains why individual actions are inextricably linked to sociological pressures; whether you're absorbing altruism performed by someone you'll never meet or deciding to jump off the Golden Gate Bridge, collective phenomena affect every aspect of your life. By the end of the lecture Christakis has revealed a startling new way

Bill Aukett's curator insight, September 29, 8:34 PM

Human networks as complex systems?

Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

The Psychology of Cryptomnesia: How Unconscious Plagiarism Works

The Psychology of Cryptomnesia: How Unconscious Plagiarism Works | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
“Any experience the writer has ever suffered,” William Faulkner told a university audience in 1958, “is going to influence what he does, and that is not only what he’s read, but the music he’s heard, the pictures he’s seen.” This notion — that “our” ideas are the combinatorial product of all kinds of existing ideas we’ve absorbed in the course of being alive and awake to the world — is something many creators have articulated, perhaps none more succinctly than Paula Scher. This fusion of existing bits into new combinations is a largely unconscious process, and for all its miraculous machinery, one serious downside is that it often obliterates the traces of the original sources we unconsciously fold into our “new” ideas. Helen Keller experienced the repercussions of this phenomenon when she was accused of plagiarism, Henry Miller questioned it when he wrote “And your way, is it really your way?” and Coleridge often tripped over the fine line between unconscious borrowing and deliberate theft.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashish Umre from Papers
Scoop.it!

An Information-Theoretic Formalism for Multiscale Structure in Complex Systems

We develop a general formalism for representing and understanding structure in complex systems. In our view, structure is the totality of relationships among a system's components, and these relationships can be quantified using information theory. In the interest of flexibility we allow information to be quantified using any function, including Shannon entropy and Kolmogorov complexity, that satisfies certain fundamental axioms. Using these axioms, we formalize the notion of a dependency among components, and show how a system's structure is revealed in the amount of information assigned to each dependency. We explore quantitative indices that summarize system structure, providing a new formal basis for the complexity profile and introducing a new index, the "marginal utility of information". Using simple examples, we show how these indices capture intuitive ideas about structure in a quantitative way. Our formalism also sheds light on a longstanding mystery: that the mutual information of three or more variables can be negative. We discuss applications to complex networks, gene regulation, the kinetic theory of fluids and multiscale cybernetic thermodynamics.

 

An Information-Theoretic Formalism for Multiscale Structure in Complex Systems
Benjamin Allen, Blake C. Stacey, Yaneer Bar-Yam

http://arxiv.org/abs/1409.4708


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Toward in vitro models of brain structure and function

The development of effective tissue-engineered models of the brain remains an elusive challenge because of its inherent complexity. Such models would be extremely important to understanding brain development, and for exploring therapeutic options for disorders of the CNS, including the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and related damage to the brain. One million, seven hundred thousand TBIs occur in the United States annually (1). These in vitro models would also be invaluable test beds for drug-discovery investigations and in toxicology evaluations. In PNAS, Tang-Schomer et al. (2) describe a promising model of a cortical tissue mimic and demonstrate its applications to a better understanding of response to TBI.

Several classes of in vitro models of the brain have been described (3), including acute preparations (or explants of CNS tissues), organotypic cultures or thin slices of CNS maintained for greater than 7 d, cerebral organoids (which can be formed from the self-organization of human pluripotent stem cells in 3D cultures) (3), and tissue-engineered constructs (2, 4, 5). Here we focus on the cell-based techniques for organoids and tissue-engineered constructs.

In organoids, the formation of cortex-like structures that are reminiscent of the human developing cerebral cortex have been observed (6). These structures promise to be useful models for brain development and neurodevelopmental disorders. Using human patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), Lancaster et al. (6) were able to model microcephaly through observations of premature neuronal differentiation. The authors used a spinning bioreactor to grow organoids up to 4 mm in diameter that could be maintained for up to 10 mo. Although this technology is truly impressive, there are key limitations to these models. Currently, adult neuronal behavior is difficult to mimic with iPSC technology and
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

There’s a new way to quantify structure and complexity

There’s a new way to quantify structure and complexity | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

In searching for sense in the complexities of nature, science has often found success by identifying common aspects of diverse phenomena.

 

When one principle explains how different things behave, nature becomes more comprehensible, and more manageable. Modern science took flight when Newton showed how one idea – universal gravitation – explained both the motions of celestial bodies and apples falling on Earth. Most important, it didn’t matter whether the apple was red or green, or even if it was an apple. Newton’s law described how everything else fell, from bricks to bullets.

 

But Newton’s gravity, and his laws of motion, and the rest of science built on that foundation had limits. Newton’s science couldn’t cope with really strong gravity, extremely fast motion or supertiny particles. Relativity theory and quantum physics helped with that. But there remains a realm where standard science has struggled to find unifying principles among different behaviors. That would be the kingdom of complexity, the universe of systems that defy simplification.

 

Such complex systems are everywhere, of course. Some are physical — the electric power grid, for instance. Many are biological — brains, bodies, ecosystems. And others are social — financial markets, interlocking corporate directorates, and yes, for God’s sake, Twitter.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Inducing Task-Relevant Responses to Speech in the Sleeping Brain

Inducing Task-Relevant Responses to Speech in the Sleeping Brain | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Falling asleep leads to a loss of sensory awareness and to the inability to interact with the environment [ 1 ]. While this was traditionally thought as a consequence of the brain shutting down to external inputs, it is now acknowledged that incoming stimuli can still be processed, at least to some extent, during sleep [ 2 ]. For instance, sleeping participants can create novel sensory associations between tones and odors [ 3 ] or reactivate existing semantic associations, as evidenced by event-related potentials [ 4–7 ]. Yet, the extent to which the brain continues to process external stimuli remains largely unknown. In particular, it remains unclear whether sensory information can be processed in a flexible and task-dependent manner by the sleeping brain, all the way up to the preparation of relevant actions. Here, using semantic categorization and lexical decision tasks, we studied task-relevant responses triggered by spoken stimuli in the sleeping brain. Awake participants classified words as either animals or objects (experiment 1) or as either words or pseudowords (experiment 2) by pressing a button with their right or left hand, while transitioning toward sleep. The lateralized readiness potential (LRP), an electrophysiological index of response preparation, revealed that task-specific preparatory responses are preserved during sleep. These findings demonstrate that despite the absence of awareness and behavioral responsiveness, sleepers can still extract task-relevant information from external stimuli and covertly prepare for appropriate motor responses.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

The Traveling Salesman with Simulated Annealing, R, and Shiny

The Traveling Salesman with Simulated Annealing, R, and Shiny | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
I built an interactive Shiny application that uses simulated annealing to solve the famous traveling salesman problem. You can play around with it to create and solve your own tours at the bottom of this post. Here's an animation of the annealing process finding the shortest path through the 48 state capitals of the contiguous United States
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashish Umre from Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

Eagle's Wings Inspire More Fuel Efficient Planes

Eagle's Wings Inspire More Fuel Efficient Planes | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

"[...] The wing tips of steppe eagles are an ideal shape to maximize lift with a minimal wingspan. The curvature at the end of the wing reduces drag. Engineers designing the A380 copied that design, resulting in fuel savings of up to 3%, depending on if it is a long or short distance flight."


Via Miguel Prazeres
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Not too fast, but not too slow: searching strategies to beat a majority group of interacting walkers

We introduce a model of interacting random walkers on a finite one-dimensional chain with absorbing boundaries or targets at the ends. Walkers are of two types: informed particles that move ballistically towards a given target, and diffusing uniformed particles that are biased towards close informed particles. This model mimics the dynamics of animals searching for food, where an informed individual knows the location of a food target and tries to persuade close-by uninformed conspecifics to go to that target. We characterize the success of this persuasion by the first-passage probability of the uniformed particle to the target, and we interpret the speed of the informed particle as a strategic parameter that the particle tunes to maximize its success. We find that the success probability is non-monotonic, reaching its maximum at an intermediate speed that increases with the diffusing rate of the uniformed particle. When two different groups of informed particles traveling in opposite directions compete, usually the largest group is the most successful. However, the minority can reverse this situation and become the most probable winner by following two different strategies: increasing its attraction strength and adjusting its speed to an optimal value relative to the majority's speed.
  
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Exact solution for a metapopulation version of Schelling’s model

In 1971, Schelling introduced a model in which families move if they have too many neighbors of the opposite type. In this paper, we will consider a metapopulation version of the model in which a city is divided into Nneighborhoods, each of which has L houses. There are ρNL red families and ρNL blue families for some ρ < 1/2. Families are happy if there are ≤ρcL families of the opposite type in their neighborhood and unhappy otherwise. Each family moves to each vacant house at rates that depend on their happiness at their current location and that of their destination. Our main result is that if neighborhoods are large, then there are critical values ρb < ρd < ρc, so that for ρ < ρb, the two types are distributed randomly in equilibrium. When ρ > ρb, a new segregated equilibrium appears; for ρb < ρ < ρd, there is bistability, but when ρ increases past ρd the random state is no longer stable. When ρc is small enough, the random state will again be the stationary distribution when ρ is close to 1/2. If so, this is preceded by a region of bistability.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Social Network Analysis Shows Direct Evidence for Social Transmission of Tool Use in Wild Chimpanzees

Social Network Analysis Shows Direct Evidence for Social Transmission of Tool Use in Wild Chimpanzees | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Social network analysis methods have made it possible to test whether novel behaviors in animals spread through individual or social learning. To date, however, social network analysis of wild populations has been limited to static models that cannot precisely reflect the dynamics of learning, for instance, the impact of multiple observations across time. Here, we present a novel dynamic version of network analysis that is capable of capturing temporal aspects of acquisition—that is, how successive observations by an individual influence its acquisition of the novel behavior. We apply this model to studying the spread of two novel tool-use variants, “moss-sponging” and “leaf-sponge re-use,” in the Sonso chimpanzee community of Budongo Forest, Uganda. Chimpanzees are widely considered the most “cultural” of all animal species, with 39 behaviors suspected as socially acquired, most of them in the domain of tool-use. The cultural hypothesis is supported by experimental data from captive chimpanzees and a range of observational data. However, for wild groups, there is still no direct experimental evidence for social learning, nor has there been any direct observation of social diffusion of behavioral innovations. Here, we tested both a static and a dynamic network model and found strong evidence that diffusion patterns of moss-sponging, but not leaf-sponge re-use, were significantly better explained by social than individual learning. The most conservative estimate of social transmission accounted for 85% of observed events, with an estimated 15-fold increase in learning rate for each time a novice observed an informed individual moss-sponging. We conclude that group-specific behavioral variants in wild chimpanzees can be socially learned, adding to the evidence that this prerequisite for culture originated in a common ancestor of great apes and humans, long before the advent of modern humans.

 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashish Umre from CxConferences
Scoop.it!

Workshop on Neural Information Dynamics, Causality and Computation near Criticality

LOEWE-NeFF and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS) jointly invite you to a “Workshop on Neural Information Dynamics, Causality and Computation near Criticality” December 12-13th, 2014

The workshop is preceded by a “Software course on Neural Information Dynamics with TRENTOOL, the Java Information Dynamics Toolkit and MuTE” December 10-11th, 2014.

 

Venue: Workshop and student course will be held at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS, www.fias.uni-frankfurt.de), Ruth-Moufang-Straße 1, 60438 Frankfurt, Germany.


The workshop addresses the analysis of neural computation in large neural systems and covers three tightly related topics in the field of modern analysis of neural data:

- Causality

- Neural information dynamics

- Large scale organisation and criticality

 

The supporting software course addresses young scientists who intend to apply information theoretic measures for neuroscience hands on, and that would like to contribute code to one of the open source toolboxes on the topic.

Apply/register before October 24th


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Upgrade to LTE Will Let Phones Talk without Cell Towers, Allowing New Forms of Social Apps and Advertising

Upgrade to LTE Will Let Phones Talk without Cell Towers, Allowing New Forms of Social Apps and Advertising | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Qualcomm, Facebook, and other tech companies are experimenting with technology that lets smartphones use their LTE radio to connect directly to other devices up to 500 meters away.

 

A new feature being added to the LTE protocol that smartphones use to communicate with cellular towers will make it possible to bypass those towers altogether. Phones will be able to “talk” directly to other mobile devices and to beacons located in shops and other businesses.

 

Known as LTE Direct, the wireless technology has a range of up to 500 meters, far more than either Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. It is included in update to the LTE standard slated for approval this year, and devices capable of LTE Direct could appear as soon as late 2015.

more...
Rick Frank's curator insight, September 30, 5:58 AM

This sounds like a good idea, peer to peer mobile phones (provided they address the security issues inherent in this)

Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

With Spinal Implant, Paralyzed Rats Can Walk Again

With Spinal Implant, Paralyzed Rats Can Walk Again | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
It’s a strange sight: a paralyzed rat walking on its hind legs in a precise cadence, all controlled by a computer.

“It is a little bit Frankenstein,” says Gregoire Courtine, a neuroscientist at the École Polytechnique Fédérale in Lausanne, Switzerland, who in a paper published yesterday in Science Translational Medicine describes his efforts to use electronics to restore fluid, realistic movements to paralyzed animals. 

The study is part of a wider effort to help paralyzed people walk again by zapping their spinal cords with electrical pulses. These signals can replace commands normally sent out by the brain, but which are interrupted when the spinal cord is injured.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashish Umre from CxBooks
Scoop.it!

Information Adaptation: The Interplay Between Shannon Information and Semantic Information in Cognition: Hermann Haken, Juval Portugali

This monograph demonstrates the interplay between Shannon information and semantic information in cognition. It shows that Shannon’s information acts as driving force for the formation of semantic information; and vice versa, namely, that semantic information participates in the formation of Shannonian information. The authors show that in cognition, Shannonian and semantic information are interrelated as two aspects of a cognitive process termed as information adaptation. In the latter the mind/brain adapts to the environment by the deflating and/or inflating of the information conveyed by the environment. In the process of information adaptation, quantitative variations in Shannon’s information entail different meanings while different meanings affect the quantity of information. The book illustrates the above conceptually and mathematically by reference to three cognitive processes: pattern recognition, face learning and the recognition of a moving object.

 

Haken, H. and Portugali, J. (2015). Information Adaptation: The Interplay Between Shannon Information and Semantic Information in Cognition. SpringerBriefs in Complexity, vol. XII. Springer.


Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

The Psychology of Writing and the Cognitive Science of the Perfect Daily Routine

The Psychology of Writing and the Cognitive Science of the Perfect Daily Routine | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Reflecting on the ritualization of creativity, Bukowski famously scoffed that “air and light and time and space have nothing to do with.” Samuel Johnson similarly contended that “a man may write at any time, if he will set himself doggedly to it.” And yet some of history’s most successful and prolific writers were women and men of religious daily routines and odd creative rituals. (Even Buk himself ended up sticking to a peculiar daily routine.)

Such strategies, it turns out, may be psychologically sound and cognitively fruitful. In the altogether illuminating 1994 volume The Psychology of Writing (public library), cognitive psychologist Ronald T. Kellogg explores how work schedules, behavioral rituals, and writing environments affect the amount of time invested in trying to write and the degree to which that time is spent in a state of boredom, anxiety, or creative flow.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashish Umre from Influence et contagion
Scoop.it!

Culturegraphy: the Cultural Influences and References between Movies | #DH #influence #dataviz

Culturegraphy: the Cultural Influences and References between Movies | #DH #influence #dataviz | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Via luiy
more...
luiy's curator insight, September 23, 6:07 AM

Culturegraphy [culturegraphy.com], developed by "Information Model Maker" Kim Albrecht reveals represent complex relationships of over 100 years of movie references.

 

Movies are shown as unique nodes, while their influences are depicted as directed edges. The color gradients from blue to red that originate in the1980s denote the era of postmodern cinema, the era in which movies tend to adapt and combine references from other movies.

 

Although the visualizations look rather minimalistic at first sight, their interactive features are quite sophisticated and the resulting insights are naturally interesting. Therefore, do not miss out the explanatory movie below.

Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

How Information Theory Could Hold the Key to Quantifying Nature

How Information Theory Could Hold the Key to Quantifying Nature | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

The Western Ghats in India rise like a wall between the Arabian Sea and the heart of the subcontinent to the east. The 1,000-mile-long chain of coastal mountains is dense with lush rainforest and grasslands, and each year, clouds bearing monsoon rains blow in from the southwest and break against the mountains’ flanks, unloading water that helps make them hospitable to numerous spectacular and endangered species. The Western Ghats are one of the most biodiverse places on the planet. They were also the first testing ground of an unusual new theory in ecology that applies insights from physics to the study of the environment.

more...
Gary Bamford's curator insight, September 27, 3:04 AM

MaxEnt - physics meets ecology.

Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

How Repetition Enchants the Brain and the Psychology of Why We Love It in Music

“The repetition itself becomes the important thing; it’s a form of mesmerism,” Haruki Murakami reflected on the power of a daily routine. “Rhythm is one of the most powerful of pleasures, and when we feel a pleasurable rhythm we hope it will continue,” Mary Oliver wrote about the secret of great poetry, adding: “When it does, it grows sweeter.” But nowhere does rhythmic repetition mesmerize us more powerfully than in music, with its singular way of enchanting the brain.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Geometry Shapes Evolution of Early Multicellularity

Geometry Shapes Evolution of Early Multicellularity | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Organisms have increased in complexity through a series of major evolutionary transitions, in which formerly autonomous entities become parts of a novel higher-level entity. One intriguing feature of the higher-level entity after some major transitions is a division of reproductive labor among its lower-level units in which reproduction is the sole responsibility of a subset of units. Although it can have clear benefits once established, it is unknown how such reproductive division of labor originates. We consider a recent evolution experiment on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a unique platform to address the issue of reproductive differentiation during an evolutionary transition in individuality. In the experiment, independent yeast lineages evolved a multicellular “snowflake-like” cluster formed in response to gravity selection. Shortly after the evolution of clusters, the yeast evolved higher rates of cell death. While cell death enables clusters to split apart and form new groups, it also reduces their performance in the face of gravity selection. To understand the selective value of increased cell death, we create a mathematical model of the cellular arrangement within snowflake yeast clusters. The model reveals that the mechanism of cell death and the geometry of the snowflake interact in complex, evolutionarily important ways. We find that the organization of snowflake yeast imposes powerful limitations on the available space for new cell growth. By dying more frequently, cells in clusters avoid encountering space limitations, and, paradoxically, reach higher numbers. In addition, selection for particular group sizes can explain the increased rate of apoptosis both in terms of total cell number and total numbers of collectives. Thus, by considering the geometry of a primitive multicellular organism we can gain insight into the initial emergence of reproductive division of labor during an evolutionary transition in individuality.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Culturomics: Quantitative Analysis of Culture Using Millions of Digitized Books

Construct a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4% of all books ever printed, and then analyze that corpus using advanced software and the investigato...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashish Umre
Scoop.it!

Mathematics Online: Wolfram Brings Mathematica Technical Computing to the Web

Mathematics Online: Wolfram Brings Mathematica Technical Computing to the Web | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

If you’re a fan of Wolfram’s Mathematica app, you’ll be pleased to hear its comprehensive tools for technical computing are now more accessible. For the first time, Mathematica is available on the Web.

While the desktop applications (Windows, Mac and Linux) remain unaltered, Wolfram is introducing a browser-based version called Mathematica Online that can be accessed from any internet-enabled device.

more...
No comment yet.