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Why Is Facebook Blue? The Science Behind Colors In Marketing

Why Is Facebook Blue? The Science Behind Colors In Marketing | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Turn out, something as simple as tweaking the color of a button changes user behavior or endears people to your product. Buffer's Leo Widrich explains the importance of color in website and brand design.

 

Why is Facebook blue? According to The New Yorker, the reason is simple. It’s because Mark Zuckerberg is red-green color blind; blue is the color Mark can see the best.

 

 

Not highly scientific, right? That may not be the case for Facebook, but there are some amazing examples of how colors actually affect our purchasing decisions. After all, sight is the strongest developed sense one in most human beings. It’s only natural that 90% of an assessment for trying out a product is made by color alone.

 

 

So how do colors really affect us, and what is the science of colors in marketing, really? As we strive to make improvements to our product at Buffer, studying this phenomenon is key. Let’s dig into some of the latest, most interesting research on it.

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Logical Circuits Created With Slime Molds

Logical Circuits Created With Slime Molds | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

"What is your current computer made of? Aluminum? Silicon? Plastic? Perhaps the slime mold Physarum polycephalum? If that last one isn’t true for you now, there’s a chance it will be in the future. Andrew Adamatzky from the University of the West of England and Theresa Schubert of Bauhaus-University Weimar have published a paper in the journal Materials Today which describes how they were able to use the slime mold to create a logical circuit."


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The Influence of Spatiotemporal Structure of Noisy Stimuli in Decision Making

The Influence of Spatiotemporal Structure of Noisy Stimuli in Decision Making | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Decision making is a process of utmost importance in our daily lives, the study of which has been receiving notable attention for decades. Nevertheless, the neural mechanisms underlying decision making are still not fully understood. Computational modeling has revealed itself as a valuable asset to address some of the fundamental questions. Biophysically plausible models, in particular, are useful in bridging the different levels of description that experimental studies provide, from the neural spiking activity recorded at the cellular level to the performance reported at the behavioral level. In this article, we have reviewed some of the recent progress made in the understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie decision making. We have performed a critical evaluation of the available results and address, from a computational perspective, aspects of both experimentation and modeling that so far have eluded comprehension. To guide the discussion, we have selected a central theme which revolves around the following question: how does the spatiotemporal structure of sensory stimuli affect the perceptual decision-making process? This question is a timely one as several issues that still remain unresolved stem from this central theme. These include: (i) the role of spatiotemporal input fluctuations in perceptual decision making, (ii) how to extend the current results and models derived from two-alternative choice studies to scenarios with multiple competing evidences, and (iii) to establish whether different types of spatiotemporal input fluctuations affect decision-making outcomes in distinctive ways. And although we have restricted our discussion mostly to visual decisions, our main conclusions are arguably generalizable; hence, their possible extension to other sensory modalities is one of the points in our discussion.

 

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The infection tree of global epidemics

The infection tree of global epidemics | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

The spreading of transmissible infectious diseases is inevitably entangled with the dynamics of human population. Humans are the carrier of the pathogen, and the large-scale travel and commuting patterns that govern the mobility of modern societies are defining how epidemics and pandemics travel across the world. For a long time, the development of quantitative spatially explicit models able to shed light on the global dynamics of pandemic has been limited by the lack of detailed data on human mobility. In the last 10 years, however, these limits have been lifted by the increasing availability of data generated by new information technologies, thus triggering the development of computational (microsimulation) models working at a level of single individuals in spatially extended regions of the world. Microsimulations can provide information at very detailed spatial resolutions and down to the level of single individuals. In addition, computational implementations explicitly account for stochasticity, allowing the study of multiple realizations of epidemics with the same parameters' distribution. While on the one hand these capabilities represent the richness of microsimulation methods, on the other hand they face us with a huge amount of information that requires the use of specific data reduction methods and visual analytics.

 

The infection tree of global epidemics
ANA PASTORE Y PIONTTI, MARCELO FERREIRA DA COSTA GOMES, NICOLE SAMAY, NICOLA PERRA and ALESSANDRO VESPIGNANI

Network Science
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/nws.2014.5

 


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Living in Cybernetics | 2014 Conference of the American Society for Cybernetics

2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the American Society for Cybernetics, which was incorporated in Washington DC on the 6th of August 1964.
Our conference this year will be a major celebration. The theme is “Living in Cybernetics”. The main event (4 to 8 August inclusive) will celebrate ASC cybernetics in the present through paper presentations themed using Stuart Umpleby’s “Several Traditions of cybernetics” (4 and 5 August), ASC cybernetics in the past through addresses from many past presidents and other long term members (August 6) developing our timeline, and ASC cybernetics in the future through workshops developing views of how cybernetics and education may come together to help make a better world (August 7 and 8).

 

http://asc-cybernetics.org/2014/


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Molecular scale MRI: System designed to peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules

Molecular scale MRI: System designed to peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

A team of scientists, led by Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics Amir Yacoby, has developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that can produce nanoscale images, and may one day allow researchers to peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules. Their work is described in a March 23 paper in Nature Nanotechnology.


“What we’ve demonstrated in this new paper is the ability to get very high spatial resolution, and a fully operational MRI technology,” Yacoby said. “This work is directed toward obtaining detailed information on molecular structure. If we can image a single molecule and identify that there is a hydrogen atom here and a carbon there … we can obtain information about the structure of many molecules that cannot be imaged by any other technique today.”

 

Though not yet precise enough to capture atomic-scale images of a single molecule, the system already has been used to capture images of single electron spins. As the system is refined, Yacoby said he expects it eventually will be precise enough to peer into the structure of molecules.

While the system designed by Yacoby and colleagues operates in much the same way conventional MRIs do, the similarities end there.

 

“What we’ve done, essentially, is to take a conventional MRI and miniaturize it,” Yacoby said. “Functionally, it operates in the same way, but in doing that, we’ve had to change some of the components, and that has enabled us to achieve far greater resolution than conventional systems.”

 

Yacoby said that while conventional systems can achieve resolutions of less than a millimeter, they are effectively limited by the magnetic field gradient they can produce. Since those gradients fade dramatically within just feet, conventional systems built around massive magnets are designed to create a field large enough to image an object — like a human — that may be a meter or more in length.

 

The nanoscale system devised by Yacoby and colleagues, by comparison, uses a magnet that’s just 20 nanometers in diameter — about 300 times smaller than a red blood cell — but is able to generate a magnetic field gradient 100,000 times larger than even the most powerful conventional systems.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Bacteria Could Grow Futuristic 'Self-Healing' Materials

Bacteria Could Grow Futuristic 'Self-Healing' Materials | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Living materials produced by bacteria could lead to interactive structures programmed to self-assemble into specific patterns, such as those used on solar cells and diagnostic sensors, and even self-healing materials that could sense damage and repair it.

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Shakespeare: Unleashing a tempest in the brain (What makes Shakespeare such a genius? It's all about how he moves our brains)

Shakespeare: Unleashing a tempest in the brain (What makes Shakespeare such a genius? It's all about how he moves our brains) | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

What makes Shakespeare such a genius? It's all about how he moves our brains.

 

IT PROMISED to be a marriage of true minds. "My dream is to understand how Shakespeare moves the brain," literature professor and psychologist Philip Davis told Guillaume Thierry when they first met. Could Thierry, a neuroscientist, help?

 

Thierry was initially nervous about braving the sound and fury of Shakespeare scholarship. "It's a minefield," he says. But the pair persevered, and joined a small cadre of researchers using quantitative techniques to examine the playwright's talents – be it his vocabulary, subtle wordplay or astute understanding of audience psychology.

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Which social media network type is your topic? Which did you want it to be?

Which social media network type is your topic?  Which did you want it to be? | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

There are at least six different types of social media network structures present in systems like Twitter and other services in which people are able to reply to one another.

 

Each of the six patterns is generated by the behavior of the individuals in the population.

 

In many cases the pattern you are is not the pattern you want to be.

This table describes each of the six patterns in terms of the difference between that pattern and the other five patterns.

 

Go down the rows until you find the pattern that most closely matches the network you currently have.  Then work across the columns until you find the pattern that you want to become.

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Bacterial foraging optimization algorithm with particle swarm optimization strategy for global numerical optimization

In 2002, K. M. Passino proposed Bacterial Foraging Optimization Algorithm (BFOA) for distributed optimization and control. One of the major driving forces of BFOA is the chemotactic movement of a virtual bacterium that models a trial solution of the optimization problem. However, during the process of chemotaxis, the BFOA depends on random search directions which may lead to delay in reaching the global solution. Recently, a new algorithm BFOA oriented by PSO termed BF-PSO has shown superior in proportional integral derivative controller tuning application. In order to examine the global search capability of BF-PSO, we evaluate the performance of BFOA and BF-PSO on 23 numerical benchmark functions. In BF-PSO, the search directions of tumble behavior for each bacterium oriented by the individual's best location and the global best location. The experimental results show that BF-PSO performs much better than BFOA for almost all test functions. That's approved that the BFOA oriented by PSO strategy improve its global optimization capability.
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The Data Mining Techniques That Reveal Our Planet's Cultural Links and Boundaries

The Data Mining Techniques That Reveal Our Planet's Cultural Links and Boundaries | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Studying cultural variation around the world has always been expensive, time-consuming work. Which is why the newfound ability to mine the data from location-based social networks is revolutionizing this science.

 

The habits and behaviors that define a culture are complex and fascinating. But measuring them is a difficult task. What’s more, understanding the way cultures change from one part of the world to another is a task laden with challenges.

 

The gold standard in this area of science is known as the World Values Survey, a global network of social scientists studying values and their impact on social and political life. Between 1981 and 2008, this survey conducted over 250,000 interviews in 87 societies. That’s a significant amount of data and the work has continued since then. This work is hugely valuable but it is also challenging, time-consuming and expensive.

 

Today, Thiago Silva at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais in Brazil and a few buddies reveal another way to collect data that could revolutionize the study of global culture. These guys study cultural differences around the world using data generated by check-ins on the location-based social network, Foursquare.

 

That allows these researchers to gather huge amounts of data, cheaply and easily in a short period of time. “Our one-week dataset has a population of users of the same order of magnitude of the number of interviews performed in [the World Values Survey] in almost three decades,” they say.

 

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Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors

Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Researchers at GE Global Research are taking a closer look. Not at Lorenz’s question but at the wings themselves. They are using nanotechnology to mimic the iridescent sheen of butterflies from the Morpho genus and develop fast and super sensitive thermal and chemical imaging sensors. In the future, the technology could be used in night vision goggles, surveillance cameras and even medical diagnostic devices.


Imitating nature is not a new idea. Swiss engineer George de Mestro invented Velcro after his dog came home covered with thistle burrs, Speedo came up with fast sharkskin swimsuits, and every aircraft engineer since Leonardo has been aping birds.


When the GE team put Morpho wings under a powerful microscope, they saw a layer of tiny scales just tens of micrometers across. In turn, each of the scales had arrays of ridges a few hundred nanometers wide. This complex structure absorbs and bends light and gives Morfo butterflies their trademark shimmering blue and green coat.

 

But the GE team also observed that the color of the wings changed when they came into contact with heat, gases and chemicals. Working with DARPA, the scientists started exploring and enhancing the wing’s properties and geometry to build better sensors. 

 

Detectors based on their research could one day they help doctors create visual heat maps of internal organs, assess wound healing, test food and water safety and monitors power plant emissions.

 

The findings could also lead to new sensors for detecting warfare agents and explosives.

 

Radislav Potyrailo, principal scientist at GE Global Research who leads the photonics program, found that when infrared radiation hits the wing, the nanostructures on the wing heat up and expand, causing iridescence and color change.

 

He and his team added tiny nanotubes to the wings and were able to increase the amount of radiation the wings can absorb, improving their heat sensitivity.

 

“This new class of thermal imaging sensors promises significant improvements over existing detectors in their image quality, speed, sensitivity, size, power requirements and cost,” Potyrailo says.


Via Miguel Prazeres, Jocelyn Stoller, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 6, 2:50 PM

Great ideas are often taken from nature! Check this one out!

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From Crystal Ball to Magic Wand: The New World Order in Times of Digital Revolution

From Crystal Ball to Magic Wand: The New World Order in Times of Digital Revolution. Dirk Helbing, ETH Zurich. Talk delivered via skype on March 24, 2014, to the AAAI workshop on THE INTERSECTION OF ROBUST INTELLIGENCE AND TRUST IN AUTONOMOUS SYSTEMS

 

We need another Apollo project, but this time focusing on our Earth. I am ready for this, are you?

Please watch this movie to the end.
The solution to our world's problems is different from what many strategic thinkers believed.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AErRh_yDr-Q


Via Complexity Digest
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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 2, 7:07 PM

I'm not perfect, but I'd say I've done a reasonably good job at predicting these things happening.

 

You have economic pinches, combined with aspirations towards ideals, of course you're going to have Arab Springs!  Furthermore, you have governments that are not following along according to the newly expressed needs of the people, you're more likely to get unrest, violence and increase the POTENTIAL for overthrow of your whole system of governance and economics (speaking, of course, with regards to Egypt especially).  Better to improve your odds and adapt yourself to the new normal of the society's needs (which are fairly consistent throughout time, space and culture).

 

What on Earth are our current policy-makers doing by persisting with the overly-cozy relationship with the private elite and their philosophies over the actual, presented needs of the general public?  Where is their more accurate view of humanity, themselves and the various needs and functions of humanity?

 

Seriously?

And I'm the one on the outside.

 

Think about it.

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Why Nvidia thinks it can power the AI revolution

Why Nvidia thinks it can power the AI revolution | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
GPU maker Nvidia is hoping to ride the wave of artificial intelligence. The company is already powering machine learning workloads within data centers of large companies, but now it’s targeting individuals with a cheap-but-powerful development kit targeted at robotics and the internet of things.
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How the Brain Decides When to Work and When to Rest: Dissociation of Implicit-Reactive from Explicit-Predictive Computational Processes

How the Brain Decides When to Work and When to Rest: Dissociation of Implicit-Reactive from Explicit-Predictive Computational Processes | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

A pervasive case of cost-benefit problem is how to allocate effort over time, i.e. deciding when to work and when to rest. An economic decision perspective would suggest that duration of effort is determined beforehand, depending on expected costs and benefits. However, the literature on exercise performance emphasizes that decisions are made on the fly, depending on physiological variables. Here, we propose and validate a general model of effort allocation that integrates these two views. In this model, a single variable, termed cost evidence, accumulates during effort and dissipates during rest, triggering effort cessation and resumption when reaching bounds. We assumed that such a basic mechanism could explain implicit adaptation, whereas the latent parameters (slopes and bounds) could be amenable to explicit anticipation. A series of behavioral experiments manipulating effort duration and difficulty was conducted in a total of 121 healthy humans to dissociate implicit-reactive from explicit-predictive computations. Results show 1) that effort and rest durations are adapted on the fly to variations in cost-evidence level, 2) that the cost-evidence fluctuations driving the behavior do not match explicit ratings of exhaustion, and 3) that actual difficulty impacts effort duration whereas expected difficulty impacts rest duration. Taken together, our findings suggest that cost evidence is implicitly monitored online, with an accumulation rate proportional to actual task difficulty. In contrast, cost-evidence bounds and dissipation rate might be adjusted in anticipation, depending on explicit task difficulty.

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Massive Data Flow: Understanding the Complex Dynamics of the Web

The Web is perhaps the most complex system that we know. Its massive scale, complex dynamism, open richness, and social character mean that it may be more profitable to study it using tools and concepts appropriate for understanding nervous systems, organisms, ecosystems and society, rather than approaches more traditionally employed to engineer technology. Simultaneously, the scientists trying to understand this wide array of complex natural systems may have much to gain by considering the emergingstudy of the Web.

 

Massive Data Flow: Understanding the Complex Dynamics of the Web
Workshop at the ACM Web Science Conference 2014 (http://www.websci14.org )
10:00 - 18:00, June 23rd, 2014
Indiana University, Bloomington

http://sacral.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp/event/MDF_WebSci/ ;


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Scientists Create Cybernetic Links Between People by DJing (A DJ and an audience are a cybernetic system)

Scientists Create Cybernetic Links Between People by DJing (A DJ and an audience are a cybernetic system) | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

 

“Our research—the notion of feedback and complex systems—informs everything we do. A DJ and an audience are a cybernetic system, controlling each other’s state.


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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 16, 5:15 PM

From a government to a society, to a DJ and an audience....to a Master/Mistress and a "slave", it's all the same stuff.

 

It's a dialectic; a dialogue without words.  It's motion, it's energy, action, perception....everything that relates to a human(s)-human(s) relationship.

 

It's amazing to me that so many of the people who hold power at the moment seem to have no conscious or sub-conscious conception of these principles.  That's how they're going to be thrown out by the mob, just because of their ideological views and their incorrectly perceived self-interests.  They just know the brutal, the club.  They seem to neither know or understand anything about the energy dynamic that's at stake between the two "sides".

 

Incredible that so many people could rise without knowing or understanding or comprehending or even wishing to know, comprehend and understand these things.

 

Silly people.

 

Think about it.

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How to Burst the "Filter Bubble" that Protects Us from Opposing Views

How to Burst the "Filter Bubble" that Protects Us from Opposing Views | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Computer scientists have discovered a way to number-crunch an individual’s own preferences to recommend content from others with opposing views. The goal? To burst the “filter bubble” that surrounds us with people we like and content that we agree with.

Via luiy
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luiy's curator insight, April 11, 10:19 AM

The term “filter bubble” entered the public domain back in 2011when the internet activist Eli Pariser coined it to refer to the way recommendation engines shield people from certain aspects of the real world.

 

Pariser used the example of two people who googled the term “BP”. One received links to investment news about BP while the other received links to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, presumably as a result of some recommendation algorithm.

 

This is an insidious problem. Much social research shows that people prefer to receive information that they agree with instead of information that challenges their beliefs. This problem is compounded when social networks recommend content based on what users already like and on what people similar to them also like.

 

This is the filter bubble—being surrounded only by people you like and content that you agree with.

 

And the danger is that it can polarise populations creating potentially harmful divisions in society.

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Epigenetics: The sins of the father

Epigenetics: The sins of the father | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

"The roots of inheritance may extend beyond the genome, but the mechanisms remain a puzzle

 

Dias had been exposing male mice to acetophenone — a chemical with a sweet, almond-like smell — and then giving them a mild foot shock. After being exposed to this treatment five times a day for three days, the mice became reliably fearful, freezing in the presence of acetophenone even when they received no shock.

 

Ten days later, Dias allowed the mice to mate with unexposed females. When their young grew up, many of the animals were more sensitive to acetophenone than to other odours, and more likely to be startled by an unexpected noise during exposure to the smell. Their offspring — the 'grandchildren' of the mice trained to fear the smell — were also jumpier in the presence of acetophenone. What's more, all three generations had larger-than-normal 'M71 glomeruli', structures where acetophenone-sensitive neurons in the nose connect with neurons in the olfactory bulb. In the January issue of Nature Neuroscience1, Dias and Ressler suggested that this hereditary transmission of environmental information was the result of epigenetics — chemical changes to the genome that affect how DNA is packaged and expressed without altering its sequence."


Via Colbert Sesanker
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Colbert Sesanker's curator insight, April 14, 12:56 PM

How does it get to the germ line?

 

"The first question is how the effects of environmental exposure become embedded in an animal's germ cells — in this case, the mouse's sperm. Germ cells have been shown to express olfactory receptors11. So it is possible that Olfr151 receptors in sperm respond to odorant molecules in the bloodstream and then change the methylation of the corresponding gene in sperm DNA.

 

Alternatively, after being exposed to the odour and the pain, a mouse might produce RNA molecules — perhaps in the brain — that make their way into the bloodstream and then selectively target the Olfr151 gene in sperm. Many studies in plants have hinted at this sort of systemic RNA shuttling. RNA molecules expressed in a plant's leaf, for example, can travel through its vascular system to many of its other tissues and affect gene expression12."

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Change: 19 Key Essays on How the Internet Is Changing Our Lives

Change: 19 Key Essays on How the Internet Is Changing Our Lives | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Change: 19 Key Essays on How the Internet Is Changing Our Lives, is the sixth issue of BBVA’s annual series devoted to explore the key issues of our time. This year, our chosen theme is the Internet, the single most powerful vector of change in recent history. In the words of Arthur C Clarke, “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” The swiftness and reach of the changes wrought by the Internet indeed have a touch of magic about them.
As a tool available to a reasonably wide public, the Internet is only twenty years old, but it is already the fundamental catalyst of the broadest based and fastest technological revolution in history. It is the broadest based because over the past two decades its effects have touched upon practically every citizen in the world. And it is the fastest because its mass adoption is swifter than that of any earlier technology. To put this into perspective – it was only 70 years after the invention of the aeroplane that 100 million people travelled by air; it took 50 years after the invention of the telephone for 100 million people to use this form of communication. The 100-million user mark was achieved by PCs after 14 years. The Internet made 100 million users after just 7 years. The cycles of adoption of Internet-related technologies are even shorter – Facebook acquired 100 million users in 2 years. It is impossible today to imagine the world without the Internet: it enables us to do things which only a few years ago would be unthinkable, and impinges on every sphere of our lives.
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Our brains: predictably irrational - 11 great talks on how your mind works

Our brains: predictably irrational - 11 great talks on how your mind works | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

The 3 pounds of jelly in our skulls allow us to reflect on our own consciousness -- and to make counterintuitive, irrational decisions. These talks explore why.

 

 

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Banish jet lag with a handy mathematical scheduler

Banish jet lag with a handy mathematical scheduler | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

An app based on a complex mathematical model promises full recovery from jet lag in just a few days, even for extreme time zone shifts.

 

Feeling groggy after that long-distance flight? Hold the coffee and reach for your mobile phone. A mathematical tool promises a full recovery in just a few days, even for extreme time zone shifts. While the model has not yet been proven in the real world, a recently released app will let people try it out for themselves.

 

Your daily activity is usually aligned with your circadian rhythm, a roughly 24-hour cycle controlled by exposure to light and darkness. But a sudden change in schedule caused by travelling to a different time zone can throw off this internal clock.

 

Timed exposure to bright lights can trigger biological markers associated with sleep patterns, such as levels of the sleep-related hormone melatonin and body temperature. That can help get the body in sync with a new schedule. Previous work on adjusting to jet lag showed that people who experience a 12-hour time shift but forgo light therapy will still be off-schedule after 12 days.

 

Mathematical models that recommend exposure patterns already exist, and the best current versions require more than a week of carefully adjusting your light exposure to get you over a 12-hour shift.

 

With help from Kirill Serkh at Yale University, Daniel Forger at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor used techniques from a branch of maths called optimal control theory to reengineer a model that Forger designed in 1999. "The equations are very hard to solve numerically, that's what has taken so long," he says.

Ashish Umre's insight:

Paper: http://www.ploscompbiol.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003523

 

Abstract:

Jet lag arises from a misalignment of circadian biological timing with the timing of human activity, and is caused by rapid transmeridian travel. Jet lag's symptoms, such as depressed cognitive alertness, also arise from work and social schedules misaligned with the timing of the circadian clock. Using experimentally validated mathematical models, we develop a new methodology to find mathematically optimal schedules of light exposure and avoidance for rapidly re-entraining the human circadian system. In simulations, our schedules are found to significantly outperform other recently proposed schedules. Moreover, our schedules appear to be significantly more robust to both noise in light and to inter-individual variations in endogenous circadian period than other proposed schedules. By comparing the optimal schedules for thousands of different situations, and by using general mathematical arguments, we are also able to translate our findings into general principles of optimal circadian re-entrainment. These principles include: 1) a class of schedules where circadian amplitude is only slightly perturbed, optimal for dim light and for small shifts 2) another class of schedules where shifting occurs along the shortest path in phase-space, optimal for bright light and for large shifts 3) the determination that short light pulses are less effective than sustained light if the goal is to re-entrain quickly, and 4) the determination that length of daytime should be significantly shorter when delaying the clock than when advancing it.

 
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What Facebook Knows About You From One WhatsApp Convo

What Facebook Knows About You From One WhatsApp Convo | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

Finally, there’s a dashboard that confirms your wildest suspicions: WhatsApp knows your name, your location, your interests, and even your political leaning. They can know things about you that you may not, like they if certain people respect your opinion (or don’t for that matter) and what preoccupies your thoughts–whether it’s sex, food, shopping or something a bit more kinky.

 

WhatsApp has become an omniscient gatekeeper, holding data about you, the personal information you write and receive, and can open the floodgates to the world at their own free will. About a month ago it would have been just 450 million people using WhatsApp, but since Facebook acquired it for a whopping $19 billion, WhatsApp could merge its data with the social media titan very soon—putting your most intimate details at the mercy of the world’s biggest social media platform with 1.3 billion users and counting.

 

Considering Facebook has over 2 billion connections between local businesses and people, it seems safe to point a finger at advertising as the long-term, overarching objective for acquiring WhatsApp. Plus, the billion-user club may just get a new member: WhatsApp gains millions of users every day, and Mark Zuckerberg himself predicts that number will reach 1 billion in 2015-—allowing Facebook to capitalize on being the global leader in data-driven messaging. If that’s not a jackpot for Facebook, what is?

 

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You are What you Eat (and Drink): Identifying Cultural Boundaries by Analyzing Food & Drink Habits in Foursquare

Food and drink are two of the most basic needs of human beings. However, as society evolved, food and drink became also a strong cultural aspect, being able to describe strong differences among people. Traditional methods used to analyze cross-cultural differences are mainly based on surveys and, for this reason, they are very difficult to represent a significant statistical sample at a global scale. In this paper, we propose a new methodology to identify cultural boundaries and similarities across populations at different scales based on the analysis of Foursquare check-ins. This approach might be useful not only for economic purposes, but also to support existing and novel marketing and social applications. Our methodology consists of the following steps. First, we map food and drink related check-ins extracted from Foursquare into users' cultural preferences. Second, we identify particular individual preferences, such as the taste for a certain type of food or drink, e.g., pizza or sake, as well as temporal habits, such as the time and day of the week when an individual goes to a restaurant or a bar. Third, we show how to analyze this information to assess the cultural distance between two countries, cities or even areas of a city. Fourth, we apply a simple clustering technique, using this cultural distance measure, to draw cultural boundaries across countries, cities and regions.

  

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Rescooped by Ashish Umre from CoCo: Collective Dynamics of Complex Systems Research Group
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Collective Decision Making with an Emphasis on Leadership and Collective Intelligence

Collective Dynamics of Complex Systems Research Group Seminar Series April 2, 2014 Kristie McHugh (School of Management, Binghamton University) "Collective Decision…

Via Hiroki Sayama
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Rescooped by Ashish Umre from Papers
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Contributions and challenges for network models in cognitive neuroscience

Contributions and challenges for network models in cognitive neuroscience | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

The confluence of new approaches in recording patterns of brain connectivity and quantitative analytic tools from network science has opened new avenues toward understanding the organization and function of brain networks. Descriptive network models of brain structural and functional connectivity have made several important contributions; for example, in the mapping of putative network hubs and network communities. Building on the importance of anatomical and functional interactions, network models have provided insight into the basic structures and mechanisms that enable integrative neural processes. Network models have also been instrumental in understanding the role of structural brain networks in generating spatially and temporally organized brain activity. Despite these contributions, network models are subject to limitations in methodology and interpretation, and they face many challenges as brain connectivity data sets continue to increase in detail and complexity.

 

Contributions and challenges for network models in cognitive neuroscience
• Olaf Sporns
Nature Neuroscience (2014) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn.3690


Via Complexity Digest
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