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Social Foraging
Dynamics of Social Interaction
Curated by Ashish Umre
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Rescooped by Ashish Umre from Influence et contagion
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Algorithm Distinguishes Memes from Ordinary Information

Algorithm Distinguishes Memes from Ordinary Information | Social Foraging | Scoop.it
Network theorists have developed a way to identify the top memes in science and study how they evolved 

Via luiy
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luiy's curator insight, May 26, 2:04 AM

Memes are the cultural equivalent of genes: units that transfer ideas or practices from one human to another by means of imitation. In recent years, network scientists have become increasingly interested in how memes spread.

This kind of work has led to important insights into the nature of news cycles, into information avalanches on social networks and into the role that networks themselves play in this spreading process.

 

But what exactly makes a meme and distinguishes it from other forms of information is not well understood. Today, Tobias Kuhn at ETH Zurich in Switzerland and a couple of pals say they’ve developed a way to automatically distinguish scientific memes from other forms of information for the first time. And they’ve used this technique to find the most important ideas in physics and how they’ve evolved in the last 100 years.

 

The word ‘meme’ was coined by the evolutionary biologists Richard Dawkins in his 1976 book The Selfish Gene. He argued that ideas, melodies, behaviours and so on, all evolve in the same way as genes, by means of replication and mutation, but using human culture rather than biology as the medium of evolution.

  

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An interactive map of more than 800,000 Scientific Papers that have influenced math and physics most

An interactive map of more than 800,000 Scientific Papers that have influenced math and physics most | Social Foraging | Scoop.it

ArXiv is an online archive that stores hundreds of thousands of scientific papers in physics, mathematics, and other fields. The citations in those papers link to one another, forming a web, but you're not going to see those connections just by sifting through the archive.

 

So physicist Damien George and Ph.D student Rob Knegjens took it on themselves to create Paperscape, an interactive infographic that beautifully and intuitively charts the papers.

 

The infographic is a mass of circles. Each circle represents a paper, and the bigger a circle is, the more highly cited it is. The papers are color-coded by discipline--pink for astrophysics, yellow for math, etc.--and papers that share many of the same citations are placed closer together.


Via Lauren Moss, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Jay Ratcliff's curator insight, September 6, 2013 10:35 AM

This is cool!  It is like the map of the Internet done last year sometime.

I lucked out and found the section about SNA in the lower left hand side of the map.  Look for Network under the Quantitative Finance section, go figure.