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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | Social Environments | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

A good overview of some urban planning models. Interesting that this appeared in a news article in Britain. If we put this in the paper in Australia, would people who don't study Geography understand it? 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 25, 2013 7:50 PM

Useful to develop understanding of the models of urban landuse zones within cities.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 10:35 PM

This article was great in that it left me with some great visuals and details on each of the models. For me, it's hard to remember each one of the models but this article really allowed me to compare each one and read about each one all in one place. The layout of the article was also nice and I think that it was just a great overall reminder of the models.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 11:56 PM

This article teaches you mainly about the Burgess and Hoyt Model. It compares the two, and it gives you detailed information on lots of the urbanization terms.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about how geographers drew up cities and made models of how cities were drawn up. It teaches you how they thought back then, and how urbanization has evolved from then to now.

Social Environments
Resources for Theme 2 on Sustaining Urban and Rural Communities and Connecting People and Places
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Children and Space

"In just a few generations, we have tightly restricted American kids' freedom to roam, play, and become self-sufficient. The percentage of children walking and bicycling to school has plummeted from almost 50 percent in 1969 to about 13 percent today. Although distance from school is often cited as the main barrier to walking and bicycling, many families still drive when schools are close to home. According to the Safe Routes to School National Partnership, driving accounts for about half of school trips between 1/4- and 1/2-mile long — which in most cases shouldn't take kids much more than 10 minutes to walk."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 24, 4:34 PM

This is a controversial topic and I certainly don't have all the answers. The free range parenting is a new to to our cultural conversations about parenting, but the ideas are anything but new. Most free range advocates want their children to have the rights to roam about their neighborhoods that others today would see as parental neglect. Many argue that as automobiles have become more prominent in urban design, it has come at the expense of children's ability to be in public unsupervised (yes, children used to be encouraged to go out to play in the streets). Children don't know their own neighborhoods as well anymore and this isn't just about architecture and design. Culturally our communal notions of proper parenting and child safety have shifted in the United States, but they are also very different around the world.  

 

Questions to Ponder: How is parenting shaped by cultural norms? What are the spatial implications of changing parenting strategies? What are the factors that shape your opinion about the 'proper' range for kids to roam unsupervised?  


Tags: housing, placeneighborhood, perspective, cultural norms, culture, transportation, planningspatial.

asli telli's curator insight, August 15, 1:34 AM

Also applies to unfortunate Turkey w/her recent urban transformation wave...

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A Super Fun Traffic Game Shows How Driverless Cars Will Reduce Congestion

A Super Fun Traffic Game Shows How Driverless Cars Will Reduce Congestion | Social Environments | Scoop.it
Good luck keeping pace with the robots.
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Pakistani truckers' perilous journey

Pakistani truckers' perilous journey | Social Environments | Scoop.it
Meet the men who navigate arguably the world's most dangerous road in order to ferry goods to remote mountain villages.
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Sick Cities: A Scenario for Dhaka City - Our World

Sick Cities: A Scenario for Dhaka City - Our World | Social Environments | Scoop.it
Bangladesh's capital, Dhaka, is a 'sick city', due largely to rapid urbanization. But planning and other measures can nurse it into a sustainable urban environment.
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Mapping Australia: Housing affordability

Mapping Australia: Housing affordability | Social Environments | Scoop.it
Based on a young person’s address and their average income can a single person, or a couple, purchase the median priced house or unit in their LGA?
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France Declares All New Rooftops Must Be Topped With Plants Or Solar Panels | CSGlobe

France Declares All New Rooftops Must Be Topped With Plants Or Solar Panels | CSGlobe | Social Environments | Scoop.it
A new law recently passed in France mandates that all new buildings that are built in commercial zones in France must be partially covered in either plants
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The Age of Every Building in Los Angeles, Mapped

The Age of Every Building in Los Angeles, Mapped | Social Environments | Scoop.it
A fascinating resource for lovers of city planning, made possible by open data.
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The 9 Worst-Designed Cities in the World

The 9 Worst-Designed Cities in the World | Social Environments | Scoop.it

"To get to the bottom of what qualifies as 'badly designed,' we picked the brains of several urban planners to highlight the flaws of some of the world's biggest cities. In the end, that birthed a list of nine cities that, for various reasons, are gigantic messes in some way or another."

 

On the list: Jakarta, Dubai, Atlanta, Naypyidaw, São Paulo, Boston, Brasilia, Missoula and Dhaka. 

 

Tags: urban, planning, urbanism.


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The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010

The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010 | Social Environments | Scoop.it
Two maps and six charts take sprawl rankings to another level.

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 8, 6:51 AM

GTAV AC:G Y8 - Changing nations

CD - The differences in urban concentration and urban settlement patterns between Australia and the United States of America, and their causes and consequences

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New studies measure the true cost of sprawl, and it's more than you think

New studies measure the true cost of sprawl, and it's more than you think | Social Environments | Scoop.it
It costs a lot more to run a suburb than it does to run a city.
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City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs

City Centers Are Doing Better than Inner Suburbs | Social Environments | Scoop.it

A new report tracks demographic trends across 66 U.S. metro areas.  The report provides comprehensive evidence for Aaron Renn's "new donut" model of cities (pictured in above image, on the right). Renn's model proposes that city centers and outer-ring suburbs are doing well economically, but inner-ring suburbs are struggling with a new influx of poverty."


Tags: urban, economic, urban models, APHG.


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Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 11:09 PM

This shows the changes in urban geography and how the world is changing due to all the new technology available now.

Bella Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 11:33 PM

Urban unit

Summary

This article goes in to depth on a newer model on cites called the donut model, as pictured similar to a donut. The donut model was created by Aaron Renn, and it shows urban development recently in cities. The center of the city is grownign economically and falling. There is an influx of people moving in , resulting in an increase of poverty too. Also more educated people are moving in like young newly educated individuals.

insight

The new structure of cities forming is a change from the old. With cities now developing bigger and more industrial, there are many opportunities for people for work in the center of the cit. however, many people may want the jobs but can't get them, so many of those in poverty live in the city centers in search of economic opportunities. It is also interesting to see the status of the people changing the in the city center with that also more young educated people move to city centers, most likely in search of job opportunities. This new way of urban development is modernizing the work system.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 8:44 AM

More and more the urban stage is filling and cities are becoming once again the next big thing. After WW2 suburbs became intensively popular but now since a change in personnel views people prefer the city more.

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Bike paths in abandoned tube tunnels: is the London Underline serious?

Bike paths in abandoned tube tunnels: is the London Underline serious? | Social Environments | Scoop.it
Gensler’s proposal to turn disused underground tunnels into arteries for bikes and pedestrians looks like fun. As a sober response to congestion, it’s ridiculous

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, February 25, 5:42 AM

CD -  The strategies used to enhance the liveability of places, especially for young people, including examples from Australia and Europe.

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Cities and Environmental Cleanliness | Sustainable Cities Collective

Cities and Environmental Cleanliness | Sustainable Cities Collective | Social Environments | Scoop.it
Over half of the world’s population now live in cities and it’s having an increasingly detrimental impact on our planet. Besides, nobody wants to live in or visit a dirty city. Hassle.com has compiled a list of the cleanest cities around the world.
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Mapping Where the New York City Subway Doesn't Go

Mapping Where the New York City Subway Doesn't Go | Social Environments | Scoop.it
This data viz of “transit deserts” shows the plight of the outer boroughs.
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The science of slums - Geographical

The science of slums - Geographical | Social Environments | Scoop.it
In an edited extract from his new book, Danny Dorling, professor of human geography at the University of Sheffield, argues that the idea of the population bomb is a fallacy and that the human population is checking its rise without the need for a grand plan

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geographynerd's insight:

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

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L.Long's curator insight, July 21, 7:06 PM

mega cities

Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 9:39 PM

This essay is written by a critic of Thomas Malthus and could serve as a bridge to discuss issues in a population unit and an urban unit.  In a nutshell, Dorling feels that that Malthusian-like fears and assumptions about the proliferation of slums are unfounded; this is a good reading that can spark some conversation in a college seminar. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, urban, megacities, squatter.

L.Long's curator insight, Today, 6:07 AM

mega cities 

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How Cambridge Became the U.K.'s Model Cycling City

How Cambridge Became the U.K.'s Model Cycling City | Social Environments | Scoop.it
It has loads of car-free areas in the historic center, for one thing.
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Urbanization in China

China's citizens are moving from the countryside into cities in record numbers, boosting the economy but making party leaders uneasy

 

Tags: economic, planning, urban, China, East Asia.


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François Arnal's curator insight, July 17, 4:15 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

 

@Céline

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 18, 9:02 AM

Une courte vidéo de la revue The Economist

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 3:54 PM

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

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World wide web? Map resizes countries by number of internet users

World wide web? Map resizes countries by number of internet users | Social Environments | Scoop.it
Oxford Internet Institute has visualised Earth’s online population, showing web usage concentrated in Europe and North America
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22+ International Borders Around The World

22+ International Borders Around The World | Social Environments | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures. These photos of different national borders around the world show you how both friendly and hostile nations like to fence off their turf.
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How to Make an Attractive City

We've grown good at making many things in the modern world - but strangely the art of making attractive cities has been lost. Here are some key principles for how to make attractive cities once again.

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Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 6:57 PM

Summary: This interesting video talks about principles that should be considered by city planners that could make our life's better and happier.

 

Insight: This video is relevant  to unit 7 because it shows efforts that should be taken by urban planners and how a simple city layout can effect our lives. 

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 27, 1:01 AM

This video gives you an overview of how to make the most attractive city in six ways. It explains the reasons and the wants of a city that potential residents are looking for.

 

This video relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about the orgin, site and situation a city should have for it to be considered attractive to people. A city should be chaotic/ordered, should have visible life, compact, is should have a nice/mysterious orientation, it should not be too big or too small, and it should be local and lively. Today, many cities lack attractiveness because of the intellectual confusion around beauty and the lack of political will. I totally agree with video and the requirement s to have an attrative city. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 4:17 AM

We definitely need more visually pleasing cities, our world is lacking and we are loosing it to like in the video "corporate opportunists".

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ESRI Story Map Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

ESRI Story Map Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | Social Environments | Scoop.it

This busiest ports interactive clearly shows how East Asian manufacturing is impacting global economics (almost 90% of everything we buy arrives via ship).  European and North American ports are few and far between on the busiest ports list but much more prominent on the busiest airport list.  


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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 8, 5:11 AM

GTAV AC:G Y9 – Geographies of interconnections

CD - The way transportation and information and communication technologies are used to connect people to services, information and people in other places

 

 

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Why Do We Love Paris but Hate Frankfurt? Six Qualities of Beautiful Cities

Why Do We Love Paris but Hate Frankfurt? Six Qualities of Beautiful Cities | Social Environments | Scoop.it

"In 'How to Make an Attractive City,' a new video from the School of Life, London-based Swiss writer Alain de Botton offers a cheeky, thought-provoking, six-point manifesto on the need for making beauty a priority in urban architecture and design."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 23, 11:17 AM

Not everyone is a fan of Paris, but the author of this article feels that tourism can be seen as helpful proxy variable for what the general public perceives as good urbanism that makes for beautiful cities.  The six main points of this article are:

  • Order and Variety
  • Visible Life
  • Compact
  • Orientation and Mystery
  • Scale
  • Local


Tags: urban, planning, urbanism, culture, tourism.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:07 PM

History is a major attraction to tourists in any city, and Paris seems to have all these requirements to be a good urban city. The variety in architecture that is blended in within past and present structures gives a distinct look and attraction. Planning, of course, would help satisfy public expectations and the variety of culture and color would add to the delightful qualities of the city. Amenities contribute to the diversity of the city and businesses affect the image of culture in the city. 

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The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl]

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl] | Social Environments | Scoop.it
The need for speed devours huge chunks of American cities and leaves the edges of the expressways worthless. Busy streets, for almost all of human history, created the greatest real estate value because they delivered customers and clients to the businesses operating there. This in turn cultivated the highest tax revenues in town, both from higher property taxes and from elevated sales taxes. But you can't set up shop on the side of an expressway. How can cities afford to spend so much to create thoroughfares with no adjoining property value?

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Alex Lewis's curator insight, March 10, 10:23 AM

This article shows the difference between extremely urbanized areas and relatively urbanized areas. Florence and Atlanta are compared. Florence has narrow streets with sharp intersections, which causes cars to drive slowly. This is safer for pedestrians. In Atlanta, the roads are wider and curves are less sharp. The most this will do is help people in Atlanta get tp their jobs slightly faster. Miami and a seaside town are also compared. The interstate in Miami takes up most of the room and there is few real estate options. In the seaside town, options are not limited, around 80% available for use. The less urbanized places are more efficient. 

 

-A.L.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 10:48 AM

This blog really made me realize what an impact humans are to the environment. They compare different cities and talk about the impacts and it really showed me how humans have built up cities.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 21, 6:12 PM

A side by side comparison at first blush is striking but the devil is in the details. Florence, Italy is a city of only 368,000 while the Atlanta metro area is about 4.5 million. Agree that sprawl is ineffective real estate and efficiency wise, but fuel prices may be having a counter effect on the reduction of sprawl. It is much less expensive to commute given the price of oil at its current levels and the millennials will have a say in this urban sprawl contracting or expanding. Many do not own cars, relying on commuter systems within the city to get around. This in theory should drive down demand for fossil fuels, culminating in reduced prices for gasoline. If the infrastructure is already built, was is the cost to maintain it, given the static population of the large metro areas? Interesting to see how this plays out.

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Stockholm's Newest Parking Garage Is Only For Bikes

Stockholm's Newest Parking Garage Is Only For Bikes | Social Environments | Scoop.it
700 bike spots, lockers, and showers and not an engine in sight.

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, February 25, 4:59 AM

CD - The influence of accessibility to services and facilities on the liveability of places

CD - The strategies used to enhance the liveability of places, especially for young people, including examples from Australia and Europe.

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How we found the worst place to park in New York City -- using big data

How we found the worst place to park in New York City -- using big data | Social Environments | Scoop.it
City agencies have access to a wealth of data and statistics reflecting every part of urban life. But as data analyst Ben Wellington suggests in this entertaining talk, sometimes they just don't know what to do with it. He shows how a combination of unexpected questions and smart data crunching can produce strangely useful insights, and shares tips on how to release large sets of data so that anyone can use them.
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