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Freakonomics Radio: Unintended Consequences of Trying to Control Traffic

Freakonomics Radio: Unintended Consequences of Trying to Control Traffic | Social Environments | Scoop.it
It turns out that there's a way to circumvent Bogotá's traffic control plan: buy another car. So what was intended to decrease driving may actually have increased car ownership.

 

The idea of certain car licence plates only being allowed to drive on certain days had some effect in Mexico City (Hoy No Ciruclar), however in Bogota it appears to be a #fail in transport planning. An interesting radio interview.  

 

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Social Environments
Resources for Theme 2 on Sustaining Urban and Rural Communities and Connecting People and Places
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Could this favela be the blueprint for how our cities should look by 2050?

Could this favela be the blueprint for how our cities should look by 2050? | Social Environments | Scoop.it
Mediaeval towns and Brazilian favelas could hold the secrets to better urban living and should be studied by architects and planners designing Britain’s new green cities, according to a leading environmental scientist.

Via Adam Cooke
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Advocates call for an increase in urban green space by 2020

Advocates call for an increase in urban green space by 2020 | Social Environments | Scoop.it
Designers and architects call for a 20 per cent increase in urban green space by 2020.
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China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain

China Has Accomplished Something In Global Trade Not Seen Since Colonial Britain | Social Environments | Scoop.it

"China is a true mega-trader — a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade (11.5%) but also of its own GDP (47%).  The U.S. is China's top export destination. China's trade with Latin America has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest-growing corridor. China's trade is beginning to slow, however. Exports accounted for about 25% of GDP in 2012, down from 35% in 2007." 


Via Seth Dixon, Kylie Taylor
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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:51 PM

China's exportation has grown so high and has reached a multitude of nations, not unlike British Imperialism. Though China has reached a lot of nation and has grown economically, it has also slowed down.

The movement of goods is greatly portrayed in economic sectors through trade patterns.

 

Sean Goins's curator insight, November 13, 1:31 PM

in the global market, china has become the rising power in the exporting market with latin america which has risen more than 200 times since 1990 and is the fastest, but has also slowed down in more recent times but is still one of the largest exporters in the world

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 10:38 PM

A new Standard Chartered report by Madhur Jha and other Standard Chartered economists, titled "Global Trade Unbundled," highlights just how much of a trading giant China has become. "China is a true mega trader-- a position last held by colonial Britain, with trade significant not only as a share of world trade but also of its own GDP", according to Jha. "China will likely become a champion of free trade." In 2013, China topped the United States for the first time. China's imports and exports of goods amounted to $4.16 trillion dollars. The United States is China's top destination for exports. This is obvious because if we look on half the items we use daily, they probably say "Made in China". China's exports with Latin America and Africa are still continuing to grow rapidly. Jha and others believe that China will remain the top trader mostly because the economic recovery is a positive for China. Also because a lot of attention is paid towards exports from China rather than imports. China's trade rates are likely to keep growing at a steady pace.

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China's obsession with vertical cities

China's obsession with vertical cities | Social Environments | Scoop.it
By the end of next year one-in-three of the world’s 100m+ buildings will be in China, as its state-orchestrated urbanisation drive prompts a megacity building bonanza

Via Adam Cooke
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Megacities Interactives

Megacities Interactives | Social Environments | Scoop.it

"By 2025, the developing world, as we understand it now, will be home to 29 megacities. We explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of these 'cities on steroids', and take a look at the challenges and opportunities megacities present for the tens of millions living in Lagos, Mexico City and Dhaka."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 27, 8:53 AM

Through this BBC interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents.   Also, this Smithsonian Magazine interactive (also on the rise of Megacities), argues that dealing with megacities is one of the traits of the Anthropocene. 


Download the BBC data as a CSV file to be able to import this into a customizable ArcGIS online map.  This will help you to create an analytical storymap (but I still enjoy a good narrative storymap).  


Tags: urban, megacitiesESRI, anthropocene, CSV.

Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's curator insight, October 27, 3:40 PM

and wuhan inside

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 11:48 AM

This article asks and answered the question of how and when we will reach a time and place where we live will be limited (as we weigh down the world)? -UNIT 1

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Before and after: seeing how much the world has changed in the last century will blow your mind!

Before and after: seeing how much the world has changed in the last century will blow your mind! | Social Environments | Scoop.it
The 20th century has been a time of huge changes for the most part of the biggest cities of the world, with millions of people moving from countries to urban areas and the capitalism transforming t...
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Uneven Population Distribution

Uneven Population Distribution | Social Environments | Scoop.it

"60% of Iceland's population lives in the red area."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 7, 9:02 AM

Similar to Iceland, Australia's population is also highly clustered.    


Questions to Ponder: Why is Iceland's population so highly clustered?  What is it about the red (and white) areas on the map that explain this pattern?  What other layers of information do we need to properly contextualize this information?  


Tags: Iceland, population, density.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:39 PM

The majority of Iceland's population lives in that one space.

The geography of Iceland keeps the majority of people in the place that sustains life and comfort the best and easiest.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 10:50 AM

Iceland is a beautiful place, yet hash climates and landscapes make it hard for equal population distribution. At the same time, its population is under 400,000 people, making it a relatively small population compared to those of other European countries. With a population that small, it almost makes sense for people to live closer to one another. It would be easier to build infrastructure in a smaller area than to spread it out all over the island, where it would hardly be utilized. Also, the one densely populated area allows for a creative center where money and ideas can be developed.

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Central Place Theory

Central Places:Theory and Applications produced by Ken Keller (kellek@danbury.k12.ct.us) adapted from Don Ziegler.


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chris tobin's comment, March 12, 2013 6:27 PM
This is interesting. Threshold and ranges are excellent tools to market goods and services especially within the hexagon model but also with statistical informaton on socioeconomic status and dispersement within a population for marketing purposes. Thanks- great information.
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 5:15 PM

Another way to think about Central Place.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 20, 11:09 PM

Good Review HUGGERS

 

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New Town - 1948 British Town and Country Planning Documentary - Ella73TV - YouTube

Animated film produced by the British Government that explains how new towns are planned. . . Ella73TV - https://www.youtube.com/user/Ella73TV2 - A curated c...
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Did You Know - Mobile Stats for Africa 2011 - YouTube

An overview of the mobile technology landscape in Africa with statistics and facts about mobile phones in Africa. Compiled by Praekelt Foundation
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Janette Sadik-Khan: New York's streets? Not so mean any more | Video on TED.com

In this funny and thought-provoking talk, Janette Sadik-Khan, transportation commissioner of New York City, shares projects that have reshaped street life in the 5 boroughs, including pedestrian zones in Times Square, high-performance buses and a...
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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Social Environments | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 4:52 AM

Cities are attractive places to live. They host local entertainment, culture and are very lively.But with the increasing number of city dewellers in years to come i can see people easily forgetting their roots. This can also become a massive enviromental problems if citys start to expolde in numbers but the cities resources remain stagnet. Imagine a city like LA doubling in numbers the water supply in surrounding areas would be erraticacted.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:23 PM

Urbanization is the now. It is the up and coming world. That statistic is easily going to be correct in 2030. None the less, the world is conforming to its popular places. Where do you go when you need to shop, or to have a meeting? The city of course. Cities will take over the world and one day, no one will live in rural areas because there might not be any to even live in.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 1:07 PM

As Bangkok, Thailand is slotted to be one of the up an coming biggest cities in the world it puts Thailand on the map.  People see that the clothes they wear were made in Thailand and we think of a sweatshop in a far east country where children are laboring away for long hours making little money.  Although this was true in the past, we see now that it isn't like that.   These cities are where a lot of people are crammed together and live, yes, but also full of people who are looking forward to a better life.  These people have hope in the future of the city that they live in and are ready to invest in the future.  When comes the time that a majority of people will live in cities these cities such as Bangkok will already be developed and thriving, a major plus for the people already living and working here. 

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TOD and Standarization and Maintenance | Sustainable Cities Collective

TOD and Standarization and Maintenance | Sustainable Cities Collective | Social Environments | Scoop.it
Transit Oriented Development (TOD) is one of those buzzwords (or buzz acronyms?) that gets thrown around a lot in city building and real estate circles. But I suspect that most people don’t exactly know what it takes to design and build successful TOD projects and neighborhoods.
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The ghastly tragedy of the suburbs

The ghastly tragedy of the suburbs | Social Environments | Scoop.it
In James Howard Kunstler's view, public spaces should be inspired centers of civic life and the physical manifestation of the common good. Instead, he argues, what we have in America is a nation of places not worth caring about.
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The most famous trips in history

The most famous trips in history | Social Environments | Scoop.it

"An interactive map to explore history's greatest journeys, from Magellan to Kerouc." 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 18, 4:20 PM

This use-to-use interactive map let's users digitally walk in the footsteps of some of the greatest explorers ever.  Some of the pivotal moments in history was when geographers sought out lands that were unknown to them. 

Carmen Arias 's curator insight, October 20, 5:41 PM

Interesting!

David Baker's curator insight, October 27, 1:15 PM

I shared this with many social studies teachers. Helping students to explore interactively is a great tool to build interest and gain perspective.

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Aboard a Cargo Colossus

Aboard a Cargo Colossus | Social Environments | Scoop.it
The world’s biggest container ships, longer than the Eiffel Tower is high, are a symbol of an increasingly global marketplace. But they also face strong economic headwinds.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 7, 2:37 PM

This article and video from the NY Times is a great way to show the magnitude of the largest vessels that drive the global economy. These containers are symbols of global commerce that enable economies of scale to be profitable and the outsourcing of so many manufacturing jobs to developing countries.  The invention of these containers have changed the geography of global shipping and today the vast majority of the world's largest ports are now in East Asia.  Today though, the biggest container ships are too big to go through the Panama Canal, encouraging China to build a larger canal through Nicaragua.      

Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 7:23 AM

This fascinating article also includes a nice trade route map and raises the quest for new trade routes. Great for year 9 Geography course in Australia - global interconnections

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Moving Toward an Evolutionary Theory of Cities

Moving Toward an Evolutionary Theory of Cities | Social Environments | Scoop.it
A popular new study claims to lump cities into four types. But the real science of cities is heading toward a more complex understanding of how urban spaces evolve.
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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | Social Environments | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.

Via Seth Dixon
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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 3, 1:21 PM

The pictures show the deep divide between rich and poor in Mexico. These settlements are built to the point where luxurious condos share a wall with decaying slum housing. The roads do not connect the areas, showing how these places were constructed separately by to distinctly different communities. While the proximity between sections shows that sights, sounds, and smells most likely carry across the two sections, the rich area looks as if it has no idea what lies directly beyond their walls. The fact that the rich areas are literally walled off from the rest of the surrounding area says a lot about the deep economic divides found around the world today.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, October 5, 9:42 AM

This photo is amazing! Not only does it show the great differance between the rich and the poor but it also shows how Mexicos social class exists. It looks like a before and after! The grass really is greener on the otherside.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 9:02 AM

Right away from looking at this picture, you can tell which side is which. I didn't even have to read the article yet to find out where the wealthier people lived and where the not so wealthy lived. The colors stood out the most to me. In the picture on the left, it is clear that this is the not so wealthy part in Mexico. The color is just filled with dark and gloominess, mostly shown in gray. The houses are also pushed very closely together. On the right side, it appears that this is the richer side of Mexico. Although the houses are closer together like the picture on the left, they are colorful. They have firm built roofs and appear to be built and taken care of much better. Something else that gives you the sense of which community is more rich is the cars. There is a whole line of cars in the right picture while in the left picture we see a few here and there. The right picture also illustrates lawns. We slightly see some grass in the left, but it is clearly not as well taken care of as the lawns in the right picture. This picture was done as an advertisement to draw attention to the gap between the two different communities. The campaign goes by the name "Erase the Differences" and hopes to get people to realize the differences in poverty that are right in front of them.

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Are “Space” And “Place” Interconnected Entities? - Urban Times

Are “Space” And “Place” Interconnected Entities? - Urban Times | Social Environments | Scoop.it
What is Space (in Geographical terms)? Is “space” a concept that is interrelated with what urbanists call “place” or is it as Doreen Massey states the sum of all the connections and relations we associate with in our lifetime?

Via Kylie Taylor
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Primate Cities: Mexico City

http://geographyeducation.org/2014/05/05/primate-cities-mexico-city/


Via Seth Dixon
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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 12:24 PM

The concept of a primate city has both benefits and drawbacks for the country in which it is located. The large population of the primate city draws new technology and foreign investment into the country. Unfortunately, the large population of the primate city also leads to population and brain drain from the surrounding regions which can damage the overall economic and intellectual status of the country. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:45 PM

Primate Cities are furthered studied using Mexico as an example.

Primate cities affect movement by having a greater pull on migrants.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 6, 2:49 PM

The spatial population of Mexico City is densely packed. The south-west side of the city or the Western Sector zone features upscale, wealthy neighborhoods. The north and eastern sectors of the city are densely populated and are the poorer sectors of the city. It is interesting looking at the city from a top-down aerial view. One can see that the wealthier western sector’s spatial geography is spread out more so than the poorer sectors and features more vegetation, possibly due to an environmentally friendly irrigation system. 

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Climate change: Earth's giant game of Tetris - Joss Fong - YouTube

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/climate-change-earth-s-giant-game-of-tetris-joss-fong There's a game of Tetris happening on a global scale: The p...
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Roads Kill Map | Pulitzer Center

Roads Kill Map | Pulitzer Center | Social Environments | Scoop.it
The global road death toll has already reached 1.24 million per year and is on course to triple to 3.6 million per year by 2030.
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World's Most Thrilling Airports

World's Most Thrilling Airports | Social Environments | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 27, 2013 4:02 PM

Amazing !!!

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:09 AM

Most people are scared enough to even go on a plan much less having to deal with some of these runways. This horrid runways include high altitude, short runways or even 90 degree turns to even advance onto the runway. Pretty scary if i might say so myself. Im surprised the St Maartens runways didn make the list with its threat of hitting a popular beach in the local proximity.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:02 PM

Some of these airports look to me as if planes won't make it. The one in Portugal goes over mountains and trees and is very short. Flying can be terrifying as it is but landing on some of these airport can be more nerve racking. This raises a question, was this the only land area these countries had to build a runway?