Supporting a Young Child's Development
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Supporting cultural and linguistic diversity in early childhood

Go inside an inclusive, culturally diverse preschool and watch the educators work together to embed children's home culture and languages in everyda
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Tips for Supporting Self-Regulation in Children - UMN CEHD

Tips for Supporting Self-Regulation in Children - UMN CEHD | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
University of Minnesota CEHD's Daniel Berry on why self-regulation skills are crucial for developing children & how parents can support these skills.
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Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn - Mind/Shift

Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn - Mind/Shift | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
When students use their bodies in the learning process, it can have a big effect, even if it seems silly or unconnected to the learning goal at hand. Researchers have found that when students use their bodies while doing mathematical storytelling (like with word problems, for example), it changes the way they think about math. “We understand language in a richer, fuller way if we can connect it to the actions we perform,” said Sian Beilock, professor of psychology at the University of Chicago.

Via John Evans
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This is essentially learning through play.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 8, 2015 9:45 PM

Students and teachers need to use all their senses and experience life fully.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Juanita Jackson's curator insight, May 15, 2015 11:46 AM

keep our students actively participating...

Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, May 19, 2015 2:27 PM

There are several topics cover d in this article. The first is the use of movement to augment learning. This is not a new idea as many foreign language teachers have been using and recommending TPR - Total Physical Response as a p highly effective teaching strategy.  

 

The second point is about the distracting nature of highly decorated rooms. In my experience, the walls need to teach.  I do agree that decorations unrelated to content are irrelevant and distracting to learning.  We do not need photos of skateboarders or beaches that encourage daydreaming.  However, decorations that review content already taught or link concents within the content are highly effective learning strategies.  Visual cues can help spiral learning.  I had teachers who created a visual content organizer and added visuals as they progressed through the year.

 

the third point is about writing as a means to reduce test anxiety.  

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Is Early Reading a Problem? - Huffington Post

Is Early Reading a Problem? - Huffington Post | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Giving each child the earliest best possible shot at learning to read is an admirable and worthwhile goal, but demanding that each and every child meet a One Size Fits All standard is not, particularly when that standard has not taken into account...
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Exploring the Outdoor Classroom

Exploring the Outdoor Classroom | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it

A while back, we set up a "science lab" in the outdoor classroom. Various shades of colored water filled bins upon bins in our dramatic play area. The children donned goggles and lab coats and set to work mixing the brilliant colors in beakers, funnels, measures, cups, basters, and more.


Via Tasha Cowdy, Von Sawers
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The Pedagogy of Place in Early Childhood Education

The Pedagogy of Place in Early Childhood Education | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Building a movement in which every child has the right to meaningful outdoor experiences that invite them to play, learn, and explore their place in nature every day.

Via Diane Kashin
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How to Nurture Brain Development In Young Children -

How to Nurture Brain Development In Young Children - | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Despite modern technology, reading still is the key to learning and proper brain development. Dr. Myer's tips for readying your child to learn to read.
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Infants Grasp Gravity with Innate Sense of Physics : Discovery News

Infants Grasp Gravity with Innate Sense of Physics : Discovery News | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Infants understand the laws of physics much earlier than previously thought. (Nu re, kam tā fizika vajadzīga, izrādās, ka bērni 2 mēn.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Listen up, baby! Rutgers research boosts listening skills of infants

Listen up, baby! Rutgers research boosts listening skills of infants | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Before we speak, we listen. A lot.

That listening helps our brains learn to distinguish which of the many sounds in our environment could possibly be related to speech.

Is the beeping microwave speech? The rumbling washing machine? The scrape of a chair leg?

A Rutgers University-Newark researcher has found a way to boost those skills in babies as young as four months old by rewarding them for paying attention to tiny bursts of sound.

Through a nifty series of 8-10 minute experiments with babies ages four to seven months, April Benasich, director of the Infancy Studies Laboratory at the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience, says she has discovered a way to help them organize the brain pathways that will help them perceive language.

It’s a big impact for such a little change.
The results were published in the latest issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

Benasich emphasized the training can’t turn a baby into a linguistic genius; it can only bolster and solidify pathways within the brain to make those connections robust, not to accelerate their development.

In the experiment sessions, a baby was held in a caregiver’s lap while short bursts of sound were played. The sounds were not words; instead, they were sounds like chirps and swishes.

When the sounds played, something interesting would flash on a video screen – colorful geometric images, or giggling children. The babies soon learned that a sound meant they’d see a fun image, so most would shift their glance to the screen in anticipation.

A monitor that was able to track their eye movements kept track of when they looked at the screen – and by inference, whether they’d perceived the sound. Each baby participated in six short sessions.

In short, the set-up was a way to reward babies for actively listening to sounds during the very time period during which their brains are developing a network of pathways to sound perception.

“What we’re trying to do is help the babies organize their brains to keep track of what’s going on in their environment and focus on what’s important,” she said.

The children were examined three months later, at the age of seven months, when EEG scans showed their brains had become more efficient at processing sounds than babies who had had no training.

“All of the kids got a boost: some a little, some a lot,” Benasich said. “It’s a big impact for such a little change.

That’s important, because other studies have shown these early skills acquired even before they can talk predict language skills at three, four, and five years of age.

The children in the study were average, without any perceived cognitive problems. If they can benefit from the “training” sessions, she speculates that the 8 to 15 percent of children who are at highest risk for delayed language because of poor acoustic processing skills might benefit from such early intervention.

The babies studied in the lab will be tested again at nine, twelve, and 18 months to see if the early boost they received continued to impact their cognitive development.

“Then we can see if the changes we made will endure,” she said. “We think they will.”

Kathleen O'Brien may be reached at kobrien@njadvancemedia.com, or at (732) 902-4557. Follow her on Twitter @OBrienLedger. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Baby see, baby do? Study shows infants take cues from trusted sources, ignore unreliable cues

Baby see, baby do? Study shows infants take cues from trusted sources, ignore unreliable cues | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Babies love to imitate. Ask any parent and they'll report how infants mimic sounds, facial expressions and actions they observe.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
Michael Ruzza's insight:

This reinforces the reasoning behind providing that strong emotional bond between caregiver and infant.

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Infants' maths skills predict their potential

Infants' maths skills predict their potential | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it

Infants who score highly on detecting number changes do better on standard tests by the time they reach preschool.

 

An infant's innate sense for numbers predicts how their mathematical aptitude will develop years later, a team of US researchers has found.

 

Babies can spot if a set of objects increases or decreases in number — for instance, if the number of dots on a screen grows, even when dot size, colour and arrangement also change. But until recently, researchers could generally only determine the number sense of groups of babies, thus ruling out the ability to correlate this with later mathematics skills in individuals.

 

In 2010, Elizabeth Brannon, a neuroscientist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and her colleagues demonstrated that they could test and track infants' number sense over time1. To do this, six-month-old babies are presented with two screens. One shows a constant number of dots, such as eight, changing in appearance, and the other also shows changing dots but presents different numbers of them — eight sometimes and 16 other times, for instance. An infant who has a good primitive number sense will spend more time gazing at the screen that presents the changing number of dots.

 


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How to teach your baby or toddler early language development through play

I am a speech pathologist and mother of a 19 month old girl. Here I teach you how you can model good language development skills with your baby or toddler us...
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Early Learning and Development Standards (ELDS) Webinar

Learn about the learning progressions within Connecticut's Early Learning and Development Standards (ELDS) and how they promote: - Equity for all children, t...
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Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn

Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Students can better understand math and physics problems by acting them out. This type of embodied learning can help open up the mind to abstract concepts.
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Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn

Why Kids Need to Move, Touch and Experience to Learn | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Students can better understand math and physics problems by acting them out. This type of embodied learning can help open up the mind to abstract concepts.
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3 Ways to Encourage Language in Early Childhood

3 Ways to Encourage Language in Early Childhood | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
A child’s first word is an important milestone most parents eagerly look forward too. However, what happens after that is just as important, as your child builds their vocabulary and learns to comm...
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Six-year-olds need to play more than they need to spell

Six-year-olds need to play more than they need to spell | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it

“ Susie Steiner: Play is essential for the development of small children. Yet it is pushed out of our educational system”


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How schools ruined recess — and four things needed to fix it - Washington Post (blog)

How schools ruined recess — and four things needed to fix it - Washington Post (blog) | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Remember when kids were actually allowed to play and get dirty at recess?
Michael Ruzza's insight:

Recess is key to a healthy child. 

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How to Promote Language Development in Infants

How to Promote Language Development in Infants | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Language development begins in the womb and continues throughout a lifetime. New research conducted by the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences at the University of Washington confirms that ...
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Language development must start early to give a child the best chance for optimal development. 

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Why early childhood care is so important - Forum:Blog - The World Economic Forum (blog)

Why early childhood care is so important - Forum:Blog - The World Economic Forum (blog) | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Early childhood care can shape a person’s lifelong capacity for learning, emotional resilience, confidence, and independence, writes Anne-Marie Slaughter.
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Brain structure of infants predicts language skills at one year

Brain structure of infants predicts language skills at one year | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Using a brain-imaging technique that examines the entire infant brain, researchers have found that the anatomy of certain brain areas – the hippocampus and cerebellum – can predict children’s language abilities at one year of age.

Via Dimitris Agorastos
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At Ten Months Old Infants Are Able To Understand Thought Process Of Others

At Ten Months Old Infants Are Able To Understand Thought Process Of Others | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
New research from the University of Missouri indicates that at 10 months, babies start to understand another person's thought process, providing new insights on how humans acquire knowledge and ho...

Via Dimitris Agorastos
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Baby's innate number sense predicts future math skill

Baby's innate number sense predicts future math skill | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
A new study suggests that the strength of an infant's innate sense of numerical quantities can be predictive of that child's mathematical abilities three years later.

Via Patrick Tucker
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Teaching Money to the Kids Can Be Fun: 5 Interesting Books

Teaching Money to the Kids Can Be Fun: 5 Interesting Books | Supporting a Young Child's Development | Scoop.it
Teaching kids about the concept of money is very important. Here are 5 interesting books for your children to help teach them about money.

Via Oscar Marin
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Early Childhood Development and Policy in a Global Context

Professor Britto is known nationally for her work on young children's literacy, and social and identity development of Muslim Arab children, as well as inter...
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