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Three is a Trend: She's Blushing

Three is a Trend: She's Blushing | Cultural Trendz | Scoop.it
The latest fashion news, trends, hottest designers, runway models, beauty looks, celebrity red carpet and fashion week coverage from Harper's BAZAAR's blog, BAZAAR Report. In a season dominated by black — even on the runways of those oft-celebrated for their deft approaches to print and color — a muted pink hits not unlike a warm breeze during a bristling winter. The rich blush walked the runway on a modified shift at Simone Rocha, on a color-blocked fur at Fendi and on an embellished peplum pencil at No.21. It's unabashedly feminine and a welcome anomaly. Read more: click on the image above.
Vilma Bonilla's insight:

Awesome color combo! On Monday, my color pallate was a simple muted pink top paired with a black peplum blazer and skirt suit. It worked out beautifully.

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FASHION FRIDAY: How to find your perfect slit skirt ♥

FASHION FRIDAY: How to find your perfect slit skirt  ♥ | Cultural Trendz | Scoop.it
Put your best leg forward in a stem-baring pencil skirt. That raises the question, however: How low (or high) can you go?
Vilma Bonilla's insight:

Nothing hotter than a pencil skirt, except one with a front side slit. ❤

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Same world

Same world | Cultural Trendz | Scoop.it

☮ ✌ ❤

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Perception

Perception | Cultural Trendz | Scoop.it

"scientists seek to learn more about the human ability to know, feel and understand certain things with no detectable prior knowledge."


Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/how-are-you-perceiving-the-world.html#ixzz399C4hFdo
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(>‿◠)✌

(>‿◠)✌ | Cultural Trendz | Scoop.it
Laugh well. Laugh often. ❤
Vilma Bonilla's insight:
Shared laughter is so attractive and restorative. I'm all about it.
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Creative genius: 4 steps to being provocative with a purpose

Creative genius: 4 steps to being provocative with a purpose | Cultural Trendz | Scoop.it

“Why?” is the question I never take for granted.

So when my 4-year-old daughter bombards me with the never-ending barrage of “but why?”s, I try to always rise to the challenge and find a somewhat intelligent answer to every question that comes my way. My philosophy is simple: The day we stop asking “why?”, as children and as adults, is the day our sense of wonder ceases to exist.
"As adults, when did we lose our imagination? When did we stop trusting our intuition and allow just knowledge and statistics to rule our lives? When did we stop asking 'why?'"

And with the sense of wonder and exploration disappears one of the most precious qualities one could possess--creativity. But the deeper my child digs, the more surely I come to the point of realization that I don’t have all the answers. And the moment my daughter sees confusion on my face, she starts chiming in with some of the most fascinating answers she can come up with. That’s when it hits you. As adults, when did we lose our imagination? When did we let go of the insatiable curiosity that shaped our journey? When did we stop trusting our intuition and allow just knowledge and statistics to rule our lives? When did we stop asking “why?” followed by the persistent “but why?” and “why not?”?

Last night I finished the book by Erik Wahl. The title is simple, but powerful--Unthink: Rediscover Your Creative Genius. It isn’t the second part that drew my attention. After all, there is a plethora of books that promised ways to discover and rediscover your inner genius. It is a simple call-to-action: unthink!

A former corporate employee, and now internationally recognized as a thought-provoking graffiti artist, Wahl radically changed his life when he lost his job in the dotcom bubble and a safety blanket of steady income with it. He was lost… for a while. And then he picked up the blank canvas and a set of the paintbrushes, knowing nothing about painting, mind you, and he never looked back. Ever since, he works with artists and corporations to help them rekindle their creative fire.

To revive passion in our working lives and open ourselves up to new opportunities, one of the things Wahl invites us to do is be provocative. The prevailing systems in which we live and work, he says, are largely unquestioned. We are given a job, a list of responsibilities, and a playbook on how to do them, and we go around executing on what is essentially a “we’ve always done it this way” approach. We embrace the system, get bored, and after a while we learn to accept the unsatisfactory existence as a necessary evil. It is part of “growing up” and “facing the reality,” we tell ourselves.

“By becoming provocative--by constantly looking for obstacles to growth and opportunities for progress regardless of your daily duties--you can provide your company with a measure of critical preparation it doesn’t currently have,” Wahl preaches. “In doing so, not only will you bolster your value to the organization, but you will open your job up to new frontiers.”
"More than rigor, management discipline, integrity, and vision, in a survey CEOs named creativity as a key attribute their companies require to be successful."

The truth is, Wahl explains, most companies need creativity more than they need clarity or stability. In 2010, IBM published the findings of a survey that asked 1,500 CEOs from 60 countries and 33 industries to name the most critical factor for future success of their companies. The answer? More than rigor, management discipline, integrity, and vision, CEOs named creativity as one of the key attributes their companies require to be successful. In his book, Wahl invites us to rock the boat, to become true artists in our craft.

“Some people wait until they are provoked by [external] forces to change, until their cages are rattled for them and their hand is forced,” says Wahl. “Artists don’t wait to be rattled only from the outside. They provoke themselves first, and then