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Training versus facilitation – which modality? | Instructor Guidance

Training versus facilitation – which modality? | Instructor Guidance | Cultural Trendz | Scoop.it

A common question that must be addressed by IEA trainers is: “Is this training or facilitation?” The two approaches are quite different and we suggest that the question be given careful thought as one prepares for a session. In general, training is more focused on content delivery and facilitation is more focused on discovery (i.e., participants going through a process of discovering the content for themselves). The following section is designed to help you think about that distinction. Our basic guidance is that there are many resources available for training, many ways to approach the experience, and your success at any given one will be influenced by your style and preferences, and by your audience.We suggest that as a trainer, you experiment with different approaches and learn which ones are most compatible with your own teaching style. Be diverse and inclusive in accepting ones with which you feel somewhat comfortable. That will allow you to be most adaptable when you enter any given training situation and interact with any given audience.

Within the modules included in this manual, different skills will be needed on the part of the delivery team. In some cases, content inputs and information will need to be structured in a way that the participant can easily assimilate and use it. The trainer who is a content specialist will be valuable to the participant by being able to structure his or her knowledge in a way that is easiest to understand in the training process and apply it to his/her work.


If training involves discussion sequences that help participants to ground the information in their own realities, share their concerns and ideas about applying it to their own contexts, or working with fellow participants to create new understanding of the information offered, then process facilitation would be an appropriate form for delivery. Process facilitation sets a container or frame for an open discussion that is purposeful and helps the participants to make connections for themselves and others, helps them adapt or use the information provided in a self-directed way, and allows for creativity and understanding of the concepts to emerge from the process constructed.

There are many facilitation tools and techniques that can be helpful to a trainer. A simple typology of tools is offered here for consideration:

 

Read more here: http://www.unep.org/ieacp/iea/training/instructor_guidance.aspx?id=1268

Vilma Bonilla's insight:

The United Nations Environment Programme provides a lovely dicussion on the differences and uses of two commonly used modalities. The chart in the original post is worth a look. Check it out! ~ V.B.

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Trainer vs. Facilitator… What’s the Difference? | The Training Clinic Blog

Training and facilitating are two different activities. They require some of the same skills, and some different skills. A trainer is often a content expert, while a facilitator is a process expert. A trainer uses lecture, conducts demonstrations, supervises skill practice, and corrects the learners’ mistakes. A facilitator leads discussions and helps participants learn from their own experiences and shared information. The trainer might lead a discussion about course content; a facilitator will focus more on the process of a discussion. This table shows some of the common differences between a trainer and a facilitator: http://www.thetrainingclinic.com/blog/?p=29

 

Vilma Bonilla's insight:

I hear many different interpretations on the difference between training, facilitating and presenting. There is a diference. This blog provides useful insight and chart analyzing the diffrent roles. ~ V.B.

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What’s the difference between training, facilitating, and presenting? | Langevin Blog

What’s the difference between training, facilitating, and presenting? | Langevin Blog | Cultural Trendz | Scoop.it

In a recent conversation with a course participant, the issue of terminology came up. This participant was concerned when she was asked to “facilitate” a session with two hundred people. It turns out that the purpose of this session was to deliver information on a new product—a “presentation,” not a facilitated session.

The terms training, facilitating, and presenting are often used interchangeably when, in fact, they differ depending on the purpose of the session. The purpose will determine the structure of the session and the skill set used to deliver it.

The purpose of a training session is for learners to acquire knowledge and skill for use in their current job. In a facilitated session, the participants are guided through a process which might include generating ideas, analyzing the ideas, solving a problem, or making a decision. A presentation is a session where information is delivered to the audience to inform, persuade, inspire or even entertain.

Trainers might use a facilitative style in a training session where they act as more of a “guide on the side” than a traditional trainer; but if the purpose of the session is for learners to acquire knowledge and skill, then it is still training. In addition, a trainer might deliver a lecture to present information in a training session. Again, if the purpose is for the learners to acquire knowledge and skill, the presentation will provide the knowledge and should be followed by some type of practice and feedback in order for the learners to develop skill, resulting in training.

If a trainer delivers a lecture and nothing more follows, then information has been presented but no training has taken place. Recently, a participant in one of my classes came to me after we had discussed the purpose of training. He said, “I just realized that I’ve been a trainer for five years but in the last five years I really haven’t trained anyone.” In his situation he was not able to follow his presentation with practice and feedback, so in effect he was a presenter not a trainer. What he did do, though, was to stop calling his sessions training and called them information sessions instead.

My point is that we have to call it what it is. There are great presenters who are very dynamic in delivering presentations and there are skilled trainers who use a facilitative style, but we always need to think of the purpose of the session to determine if it’s training, facilitation, or a presentation.

Regardless of the purpose, Langevin has a workshop to help hone your instructional techniques, your facilitation skills, or your presentation skills so come see us and we’ll make sure you’re on the right track!

So trainers, how many of you out there are really delivering training?

Vilma Bonilla's insight:

"The terms training, facilitating, and presenting are often used interchangeably when, in fact, they differ depending on the purpose of the session."

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