Social Business
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Social Business
A collection of news items dedicated to social business, social finance and community enterprise. I have added a smattering of education and micro-business links too...enterprise, learning and community benefit - a potent mix to change the world.
Find me on LinkedIn here: http://uk.linkedin.com/in/timsmithsocialenterpriseworks
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How Africa can build inclusive, safe and sustainable cities - Quartz

How Africa can build inclusive, safe and sustainable cities - Quartz | Social Business | Scoop.it
Recently, world leaders gathered in New York to commit to the new sustainable development goals. For the first time, a specifically urban goal is among the 17 goals to be achieved by 2030. This goal is to “make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable”. It reflects growing recognition that human development depends...
Tim Smith's insight:

Thought this was a fine example of how cities, in any country, can adopt sustainabilty practices. The article, from the on-line magazine Quartz, looks specifically at cities in Africa.

 

It cites the example of Ghana, and the city of Accra in particular. Here a World Bank reports links urbanisation, productivity and poverty reduction.

 

Looking at Ghana's growth between 1984 and the present day, the article reflects on how over this period their GDP has averaged 5.7 percent, with industrial and service employent increasing by 21 percent. The city of Accra has achieved, it is claimed, a 20% reduction in poverty.

 

We do  not hear enough, I would argue, about the economic and social successes being achieved in Africa. With the UN recently publishing its sustainable development goals for achievement by 2030, perhaps Africa's time is now here?

 

You can see the Development Goals 2015 on this web page:

http://www.globalgoals.org/

 

You can see the World Bank data and report mentioned in the article here: http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/2015/05/24477568/rising-through-cities-ghana-urbanization-review-overview-report

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Social Enterprise Programs: ‘Like Little Warts On A Business School’ | Poets and Quants

Social Enterprise Programs: ‘Like Little Warts On A Business School’ | Poets and Quants | Social Business | Scoop.it

A candid interview with Skoll Centre's Pamela Hartigan at the University of Oxford's business school

... Where Pamela reflects on social entrepreneurship, descriptions of social value and what drives the social entrepreneur...

Tim Smith's insight:

Arguably the social entrpreneurship education 'market' is now a mature setting for the growth and encuragement of social business or community enterprise.

In this article Pamela Hartigan, of the Skoll Centre in Oxford, argues how unimportant money is, as a motivating factor, to the social entrpreneur. Also how very hard it actually is to start a business focused on social outcome, particularly in the SME sector.

 

Also offered are interesting insights into the journey individuals take who see themselves as drivers of social businesses. The traditional build, capitalise and exit model of the traditional business owner/driver is absent, Hartigan argues, in the social entrepreneur.

 

He or she is so emotionally and ethically linked to the social outcome of their work that they never really let go, she says. A notion that chimed with everyone in our office!

 

The Skoll World Forum on Social Entrpreneurship is on April 15th to 17th.  See more of this Skoll Foundation event here...

http://skollworldforum.org/

 

If you can't attend, check out the web pages for updates on the latest entrpreneurial approached to pressing community problems. We recommend it! Let's turn those little warts into molehills and then mountains....

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Social Finance and Human Capital

Social Finance and Human Capital | Social Business | Scoop.it
Roger H. Moors and Justin Beresford have recently published a new paper on Social Finance and Human Capital: the case for social investment in higher education. The paper presents an interesting ar...
Tim Smith's insight:

An interesting new take on how HIgher Education might be funded in the UK.

 

The Moors/Beresford thesis holds that there is real traction in taking a 'social finance' view of a students academic life and career.  

 

Using an investment pot from external funders to deliver the teaching and research necessary, but where the individual student and the original investors get a lifelong return over time for their input. Education at HE level as a form of 'pension investment' vehicle, in essence.

 

An interesting take on how individuals and investment trusts might interact with HE institutions. Whatever your view on the wholesale privatisation of education, there is a good idea waiting to burst out here.

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Business Ethics: How to Create an Ethical Organization

Business Ethics: How to Create an Ethical Organization | Social Business | Scoop.it
Learn the 90 best practices for how to design ethical businesses and manage ethical organizations of high integrity.

Via Paulo Gervasio
Tim Smith's insight:

Udemy, the US based MOOC, are offering a detailed course on how to start and maintain an ethical business.

 

The training recognises 90 practices for the ethical business organisation. With the course breaking down the objectives into a simple 'do and review' learning process.

 

The course also covers ethical training, ethics assessment in the workplace, recruiting ethical employees and ethical decision making and reporting. The course, we would argue, represents a great platform to help you build a business ethics base of real strength into your social business or social enterprise...whichever part of the world you are in.

 

The course material offers 27 lectures, 11 quizzes and over three hours of high quality video. If you are passionate about ethics in business, want to change the world and have lifetime access to this reference material...this could possibly be the best $49 you will ever spend?

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Startups in Nike-backed accelerator put girls first in fight against global poverty

Startups in Nike-backed accelerator put girls first in fight against global poverty | Social Business | Scoop.it
The 'Girl Effect' accelerator targets companies that have the potential to lift young women out of poverty.

Via W. Robert de Jongh
Tim Smith's insight:

 

This is a great movement. Supporting women and girl entrepreneurs who, research indicates, are most likely to invest surplus income into entrepreneurial activity designed to benefit their family.

 

The Nike Foundation and The Unreasonable Group recently held a two week long mentoring session for projects, based upon the ideas and creativity of girls recruited to the scheme.

 

"The Girl Effect is grounded in research that shows that a key to combating poverty on a global scale is protecting, educating and investing in girls in developing regions, which will in turn strengthen communities as a whole. Many studies show that women in developing countries tend to invest more of their earnings into their family's well-being than men".


It's only one idea amongst many, but every little helps to stimulate a female driven economy, to help adjust the social balance and empower female entrepreneurs.


See the Nike Foundation here: http://news.nike.com/nike-foundation

See the Unreasonable Group here: http://unreasonablegroup.com/


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New UK study looks to turbo-charge social impact investment - The Guardian

New UK study looks to turbo-charge social impact investment - The Guardian | Social Business | Scoop.it
The Guardian New UK study looks to turbo-charge social impact investment The Guardian On the supply side, there's a call for the fiduciary duties governing charitable foundations and pension funds to be clarified so that trustees can consider...
Tim Smith's insight:

This brief article from The Guardian looks at a number of resources which are available to assess and measure the continuing growth of the 'social impact' investment sector.

 

The key report, from the UK Government's Social Impact Investment Task-force, looks at how the key players in the UK Third Sector, along with mainstream capital  providers in development, enterprise and banking, can lend their weight to this new movement.

 

The Guardian article, and specifically the report, looks at recommendations as to how the governance structures of charities, for example, can embrace social investment by taking a social outcome view of its investment policies, weighted equally with their fiduciary obligations to achieve appropriate levels of fiscal return on their investments.

 

You can access the Task-force report here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/social-impact-investment-taskforce

 

Please care even more about societal outcomes in your work, might be a more brutal, shorthand for the piece!

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10 Radical Ideas for Getting Kids to Read

10 Radical Ideas for Getting Kids to Read | Social Business | Scoop.it
Our children don't like to read, and their abysmal reading scores reflect this disdain. It's time to think out of the box.
Tim Smith's insight:

I really liked this list of initiatives that parents and carers can try with their children, from Donna Marie Williams at the Huffington Post.

 

The range blends a love of technology, balanced by shared time with a good, old fashioned book. Rationing each hour of screen time with an hour of reading, for example.

 

She also promotes the use of e-readers which, if the children have access to technology, is one way to make reading 'cool' certainly.

 

The list also highlights the way that churches and faith groups can play their part by flexing activities for children to encourage reading.

 

Long through the 19th Century the 'monitor' method of teaching was used to share knowledge and practice with learners. A pupil with a book and advanced skills, actively helped younger, less able children to acquire those same skills.

 

A Sunday morning 'readathon' is an ideal place to bring back a very old idea. Don't you agree?

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PHILANTHROPY 2173: Digital civil society - the infographic

PHILANTHROPY 2173: Digital civil society - the infographic | Social Business | Scoop.it

What does the digital civil society look like?

Lucy Bernholz attempts a visualisation...

PHILANTHROPY 2173, THE FUTURE OF GOOD

Tim Smith's insight:

I liked Lucy's visualisation. Recognising the connections and overlap in my own life and businesses.

 

Most people who work in the third sector, developing projects that move forward the social agenda, public policy and ethical business energy will see the connections I suspect too.

 

It's also good to see the 'informal' aspect of the digital life present. It is very difficult to see, often, where business and a public life separate from the private domain, given the ubiquity of laptops, smart-phones, tablets, Twitter, Google+.............which are nearly always on.

 

I think this could also be a template for a socially active, ethical and web connected community enterprise, although not all segments would have the same weight perhaps?

 

An interesting presentation though...

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Is yours a socially productive place?

Is yours a socially productive place? | Social Business | Scoop.it
Today sees the launch of a new RSA report, generously sponsored and in collaboration with British Land - Socially productive places - Learning from what works: lessons from British Land - born out ...
Tim Smith's insight:

A new research report that looks at the relationship between developers, urban planners and the communities they build and legislate for.

 

I liked the reflection, not  that collaboration or reflective working to add value is new in our sector, but that it delineates this new skill set for organisations and professions not previously known for imaginative flair.

 

A little hard perhaps, but thinking about public spaces in a new way need not be a profit-less activity for either developer or community.

 

See more of this RSA report here - http://www.conversationseast.org/is-yours-a-socially-productive-place/

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Are Nonprofits the Future of Work? Rifkin's New Book Promotes a Redistributive ... - The Nonprofit Quarterly

Are Nonprofits the Future of Work? Rifkin's New Book Promotes a Redistributive ... - The Nonprofit Quarterly | Social Business | Scoop.it

Are Nonprofits the Future of Work? Looking at The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism by Jeremy Rifkin (Palgrave MacMillan, 2014)

Tim Smith's insight:

This article in The Non-Profit Quarterly  by Larry Kaplan explores the ideas in The Zero Marginal Cost Society by Jeremy Rifkin.

 

In it, the argument goes, is the idea that capitalism is doomed because of two things.The ever increasing quest for productivity is combined by the advance of new technology. This will, it is argued, drive down the costs of production to zero, reducing margins expotentially and reducing labour costs, or the ability to pay them, to zero.

 

The end result, it is argued, is the extinction of employment. What a deeply pessimistic view of human ingenuity and progress!

 

In  Kaplan's view society, politicians and businesses will soon have to face a difficult choice. To develop new models of resource distribution and delivery to sustain life, economic, social and cultural.

 

I would perhaps argue that technology itself, far from diminishing production costs in our present model, merely creates new modes of production and facility that were previously unimaginable. The ideas about the efficacy of the social enterprise do ring true however.

 

It is new technology and the business dedicated to social outcome that will drive the new paradigm. What do you think?

 

Image: industry © Sarah Klockars-Clauser Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike

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Changing The Economic Paradigm Through Developing Community Enterprises ... - Eurasia Review

Changing The Economic Paradigm Through Developing Community Enterprises ... - Eurasia Review | Social Business | Scoop.it

Eurasia Review
Changing The Economic Paradigm Through Developing Community Enterprises ...The industrial man is not a sustainable economic or social entity within any community...

Tim Smith's insight:

This article, by an Australian academic, though telling is one that is little heard at the moment.

 

Murray Hunter argues for a return to artisan and craft based community enterprise, developing culturally sensitive and tradition based products and services, in order to make sustainable life in the rural environment.

 

Although writing about SE Asia, Hunters's argument can be applied to any rural community, even those based in an 'advanced' Western country for example.

 

He argues that we are trapped in an emergent multi-national, gross profit, shareholder delivery nightmare, where the skills of the craftsman, neglected and under-appreciated, could be transformed by new thinking and the application of new technologies.

 

Using the internet, for example, to reach a new customer base, not in terms of multi-national cultural dominance, but to simply place crafted items in new communities. Sustaining both.

 

I liked the argument. It's about linking rural enterprise to community confidence and the history of making.

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Human-Centered Design for Social Innovation - a free on-line short course

Human-Centered Design for Social Innovation - a free on-line short course | Social Business | Scoop.it
Human-Centered Design for Social Innovation is a seven-week course that will introduce you to the concepts of human-centered design and help you use the design process to create innovative effective and sustainable solutions for social change. No prior design experience necessary. Acumen believes in the importance of incorporating the principles of human-centered design when creating solutions to problems of poverty so that low-income customers are provided with choice not just charity.
Tim Smith's insight:

I have just signed up - so that I can join a team in the UK and work through the course materials collaboratively with others. 


Human centred design is the concept of providing innovative social solutions to low income, or disenfranchised communities, across the globe. Solutions that focus on understanding the needs and culture of the community to create a movement or project that really has impact.


In Social Business terms '...what is it my community of interest really wants?' In community development terms the long periods of my life spent consulting, mapping and frame-working often came to nought as the dominant local authority sought to impose a solution from above.


The notion of a development model that is truly collaborative and inclusive at the design stage is immensely appealing. I'll let you know how it goes.


Why not start a group in your community and see what happens?

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The social impact bond wars: The defense responds and the prosecution rests - a commentary on private profit and social output...

The social impact bond wars: The defense responds and the prosecution rests - a commentary on private profit and social output... | Social Business | Scoop.it
PBS NewsHour The social impact bond wars: The defense responds and the prosecution rests PBS NewsHour Are social impact bonds, like the kind used to finance a cognitive behavior therapy program at Rikers Island, above, a profit-maker for investors...
Tim Smith's insight:

An interesting article by Jane Hughes and Alisa Helbitz on the U.S. social impact bond marketplace, given the recent media coverage of the 'Peterborough Experiment' here in the U.K.

 

The narrative highlights how, despite the trumpeting of investment by major financial houses, like Goldman Sachs for instance, these corporate investors in social impact are still happy to take maximum percentage return on their cash input.

 

Surely, as with the UK impact investment sector, some diminution of massive financial return is to be both expected and appreciated by the impact investors. The leveling of gross return is a commensurate part of the social impact proposition. Not only to maximise social return over the financial, but also to remove any danger of 'moral hazard' for the managers of the projects invested in.

 

Evidence of this latter risk is all too evident in the delivery of the international banking sector as a whole, I would argue.

 

In summary, the article nicely sums up the best outcome for social impact investing...' we don’t need financiers working for private gain from social programs; we need citizens working for greater public revenue and its more effective use by government in funding nonprofit services and programs that reduce inequality and raise the quality of life for all of us'.

 

If only...?

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SALt | It's a Social Movement

SALt | It's a Social Movement | Social Business | Scoop.it
Tim Smith's insight:

SALt - sustainable alternative lighting.  'Add 1 glass of water and 2 tablespoons of salt, use the lamp for 8 hours'.

 

This is a Phillipines based, family run sustainability initiative. The lamp will run on sea water for example, and can, if used wisely, provide eight hours of additional lighting a day.

 

The web link is also worth checking out, to see how a tech project can also be a social movement, an enterprise creator and a compliment to the creativity and inventiveness of younger people.

 

Donate to the project and help 'light up' the lives of remote tribal people! See http://salt.strikingly.com/

 

We have written about lighting projects in remote places before, but this one really captured our imagination.

 

Don't buy kerosene, collect sea water! Brilliant.

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World Water Day 2015: All

World Water Day 2015: All | Social Business | Scoop.it

" World Water Day is marked on 22 March every year. It’s a day to celebrate water. It’s a day to make a difference for the members of the global population who suffer from water related issues. It’s a day to prepare for how we manage water in the future.

In 1993, the United Nations General Assembly designated 22 March as the first World Water Day. 22 years later, World Water Day is celebrated around the world shining the spotlight on a different issue every year. This issue is also the theme of the annual UN World Water Development Report which is launched on World Water Day.

In 2015, the theme for World Water Day is 'Water and Sustainable Development'. It’s about how water links to all areas we need to consider to create the future we want". 

Tim Smith's insight:

Keeping our water theme alive...World Water Day 2015 has just passed, but you can still visit the 2015 web pages and see how water related issues remain critical to the well being of so many.

 

You can visit the web pages of World Water Day here to see how the UN and its partners continue to strive for sustainable solutions for communities.

 

See: http://www.unwater.org/worldwaterday/features

 

There is, on these pages, a link to a new report 'Water for Women'. It shows some of the practical considerations that need to be made in order to make the water solution sustainable. Installing a pump and then leaving the country is not the solution. There needs to be a maintenance and support infrastructure to ensure that the installation does not fall into disrepair, for example.

 

This represents a skill and employment opportunity. Similarly, how do women, who previously spent up to twenty hours a month waiting idly for water now spend the time and opportunity that has been released to the benefit of their families and children.

 

One good idea should lead to another. See a pdf copy of the report 'Water for Women' here...

http://www.unwater.org/fileadmin/user_upload/worldwaterday2015/docs/Water%20For%20Women.pdf

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WaterWheel to ease burden on women | Mark Tran

WaterWheel to ease burden on women | Mark Tran | Social Business | Scoop.it
Mark Tran: Round 50-litre container enables water collectors to roll liquid from wells rather than carry it on their heads

Via W. Robert de Jongh
Tim Smith's insight:

What a great idea. It's technology, but of a low enough entry point to radically improve the lives of women in remote rural areas.

 

Wello, the social business designing and building the products, now have a distribution partner in India. They are currently looking at the development of mobile advertising banners to help with the spread of knowledge in the same target communities.

 

In a world where individuals are lost in a sea of mobile technology, iPads and laptops it is fantastic to see people still concentrating on the growth of products to transform lives of those who are still at the start of their 'technology journey'.

 

Visit the company web pages here: http://wellowater.org/

 

Volunteer, or just get a media pack and spread the word. There are many other arid areas of the world where this direct sort of practical, baseline intervention can have a transformative effect.

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Why Human Capital Threatens Impact Investing

Why Human Capital Threatens Impact Investing | Social Business | Scoop.it
The last of a five-part series: If we don’t focus on human capital, we run the risk of the impact investment world excluding a large number of talented professionals.
Tim Smith's insight:

An interesting article on Impact Investing and its inability to balance the demands of human capital development.

 

Simply put, the tension that exists between the impact investor and the deliverer of the social outcome and fiscal surplus is conditioned by the skill set and commitment of the individuals delivering the work for the investment vehicle.

 

Does the organisation seeking investment imperil the work by ignoring the development of it's workforce? There is something of the long running awareness in any Third Sector network, namely that the satisfaction gained from the work comes with no expectation of large salaries or pronounced corporate benefits.

 

The article looks the the 'jobs board' of the Global Impact Investing Network (GINN), citing the board as a source of both highly committed but also highly skilled individuals dedicated to social aims.

 

I guess the solution for impact investment is a culture that rewards both skill set and social outcome commitment, but which is based on 'good' not 'greed'. The debate will continue...

 

See the GINN Careers Centre board here:

http://jobs.thegiin.org/

 

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Government considers Social Value Act extension | Civil Service World

Government considers Social Value Act extension | Civil Service World | Social Business | Scoop.it
Tim Smith's insight:

A short article from the pages of Civil Service World. Telling us that pressure from players in the Social Economy are pressing successfully for government in the UK to extend the reach of the Social Value Act.

 

Whilst this is important the article shows some of the tensions still abroad in Whitehall. A very conservative view of cost reduction, rather than socially contracted outcome, still seems to be a key policy driver.

 

Still, for those of us who work n the Social Economy, putting community impact ahead of profit as a priority, see some comfort in the debate.

 

See what you think...

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Open Co-ops: Inspiration, Legal Structures and Tools - stirring up community business...

Open Co-ops: Inspiration, Legal Structures and Tools - stirring up community business... | Social Business | Scoop.it
Tim Smith's insight:

 

 

This is a comprehensive and thorough article from the publication STIR. Radical new governance forms for social business, community enterprise and co-operatives.

See more at http://stirtoaction.com/

 

Providing a bit of background and history, with access to on-line tool-kits, this piece will be of interest to community activists or business entrepreneurs who want to fully embrace co-operative ownership as a means to engage, encourage and create enterprise owned by all.

 

Interesting key links from the text are given below and are a good place to start...

 

The Enspiral Network

http://www.enspiral.com/

 

One Click Orgs - getting your founding documents right

http://www.oneclickorgs.com/

 

Important knowledge and interpretations if you want your new organisation to break out of non-collaborative, command and control structures that traditionally invest themselves in self-interest and exclusive power structures.

 

An enjoyable read for the radically minded.

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Ofcom: six-year-olds understand digital technology better than adults

Ofcom: six-year-olds understand digital technology better than adults | Social Business | Scoop.it
Children, growing up with YouTube, Netflix and Spotify, learning to use smartphones or tablets before they are able to talk
Tim Smith's insight:

 

I knew it wasn't just me.

 

Having recently featured an article that looked at the ever widening knowledge gap about ICT in schools, here is another insightful piece of research from Ofsted.

 

In it they argue that measuring their 'digital quotient', children of six years of age have a better understanding of ICT than adults in the age cohort 45 to 49 years.

 

I knew my musing about new media on that tube train a few weeks ago had a core of truth to it. If you would like to take a Digital Quotient test to see how far in excess of your average six year old your skills are, you can visit this Ofsted web page and take the test online

https://research.ipsosinteractive.com/mrIWeb/mrIWeb.dll

 

You may be surprised how proficient your children really are, thanks to the emergence of well thought out web services and wide access to digital broadband connections.

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Britain faces 'growing shortage' of digital skills - Telegraph

Britain faces 'growing shortage' of digital skills - Telegraph | Social Business | Scoop.it
An independent task force has called on the Government to invest £20 million to help embed the new computing curriculum in schools, warning that the UK could struggle to fill digital roles in the future
Tim Smith's insight:

You can read the headline findings of the recent report which shows that we face a cliff edge in skills and understanding of the potential of ICT in the UK. (Digital Skills for Tomorrow's World by City & Guilds).


More alarming is that the teachers surveyed to take a lead in the digital curriculum felt underpowered for the task, through lack of experience and training.


The report also calls for...


Computing to become a fourth ‘core science’, giving pupils access to digital training up to 19 years of age.

A network of school governors with expertise in computing to be established.

Collaboration between schools, colleges and universities to enhance careers advice and the curricular and extra-curricular opportunities available to young people..

 

...as well as a new £20m investment in closing the skills gap.

 

Or is the problem, at heart, the pupil knows more than the teacher? Seeing four year old's on the Tube with their own smart-phones, I wonder? (...or perhaps I'm just becoming a reactionary old 'techie' myself?''')

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The United Nations: Put financial inclusion for women into the UN's Post 2015 Development Goals

The United Nations: Put financial inclusion for women into the UN's Post 2015 Development Goals | Social Business | Scoop.it
Women in many parts of the world do not have basic financial services or financial literacy, making it very hard for them to be free and plan for their future.
Tim Smith's insight:

"Everywhere, women are denied access to the capital necessary to run businesses that could feed or educate their children and benefit communities".

 

A simple on-line petition to persuade the UN to add the cause of women's financial inclusion to their post 2015 development goals.

 

Add your voice today.

 

You can read more about financial inclusion in UN development processes here...

http://www.unsgsa.org/priorities/key-initiatives/post-2015-development-agenda

 

You can see the Millennium Development Goals for the Economic and Social Council of the UN here...

http://www.un.org/en/ecosoc/about/mdg.shtml

 

You can see, via this last link, the current post 2015 agenda. Every item is highly worthy, from reducing child mortality, poverty eradication and gender equality. If there is a paradigm shift in capitalism ahead, then financial inclusion for women should be on the list.

 

At ground level, in communities, advances in financial literacy and access to very modest funds could transform whole families, regions and social business sectors. There is a huge reservoir of talent and potential waiting to be released...

 

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Can Social Enterprises Really Solve Poverty?

Can Social Enterprises Really Solve Poverty? | Social Business | Scoop.it
Can social enterprises really solve poverty? Our considered view is that they can indeed make a tremendous contribution, but only if those of us who support these enterprises widen our lens and change our approach. We need to start seeing the systemic nature of the challenges that they face and play a stronger role to helping them overcome those challenges.
Tim Smith's insight:

An interesting take on the efficacy of Social Enterprise as solution provider for poverty and 'difficult to reach' social problems by Harvey Koh, Director of Monitor Deloitte.

 

In essence Koh argues that the answer to the headline is no, they cannot. Qualifying this position by adding that SE's can go a long way towards achieving solutions, as long as there is a supportive and empathetic distribution and socially mediated development landscape to support their efforts.

 

This rings true, whether you are a local community trying to buy and sustain your village shop, or a larger organisation working on health or hunger projects, in a regional or large sub-national context.

 

In the first example, yes you need customers, but you also need retail expertise or energy, inventory control  processes and some rudimentary marketing to sustain your village shop. In the latter case, Koh provides a clear example of medicines delivered into regions with no doctors or health infrastructure or knowledge to help dispense and deliver the newly arrived solutions.

 

A hard look at sustainability, whatever the context. Delivery, in this latter case is not sustainability, or even effectiveness. Context is.

 

All of us in the SE sector know, I guess, that an empathetic landscape is the one true key element to our social enterprise success?

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Social Progress Index - new data - making social progress as inportant as GDP?

Social Progress Index - new data - making social progress as inportant as GDP? | Social Business | Scoop.it

The Social Progress Imperative creates a shared language and common goals to align different organisations and achieve greater social impact.

Tim Smith's insight:

The Social Progress Index 2014, produced by the Social Progress Imperative, is now available on-line.

 

The index calculates and compares value indices under three main headings - basic human needs, the foundations of well-being and opportunity.

 

The United Kingdom lies 13th in the world ranking for this year. New Zealand, Switzerland and Iceland constitute the top three.

 

The web pages also offer detailed analysis on the strengths and weaknesses of each nation. As expected we do well on water and sanitation, for example, but in terms of wellbeing the scores for the UK highlight some room for improvement in ecosystem sustainability.

 

We also score highly in our society's ability to provide opportunities for individuals to improve their lot, but have real weaknesses in the areas of tolerance and inclusion. Oh to see ourselves as others see us?

 

'...the Social Progress Imperative is working through partners in the Social Progress Network to make the concept of social progress as important as economic growth or Gross Domestic Product'. 

 

Read more here: http://www.socialprogressimperative.org/data/spi

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Building in charitable value from the very beginning | 80,000 Hours

Building in charitable value from the very beginning | 80,000 Hours | Social Business | Scoop.it

"Matt Gibb has been involved with 80,000 Hours since its inception. Early on, he was influenced by the idea of earning to give and has been pursuing this for the last few years through entrepreneurship.

 

When we spoke to him he was focussed on a company dropkic.kr at the startup incubator Betaspring. With dropkic.kr, Matt has tied himself and his co-founders to the mast by adding a legally binding agreement to the company charter to donate ⅓ of any proceeds they from selling their stake to GiveWell or Giving What We Can recommended charities".

Tim Smith's insight:

I've followed 80,000 hours for a while now. I am interested in how new graduates, in this case from Oxford, are adopting the 'earning to give' philosophy - materially shaping their professional lives to encompass social value.

 

Although this article is concerned with start-ups, tech start ups at that, the key element is how the founders have built in social value results to condition their actions at the point they realise their assets and move on.

 

The work, during its foundation and growth can still follow a triple or quadruple bottom line model, but the payout comes, in every sense, when the founders divest themselves of their interest.

 

A great example of how to do it right for the sector, as well as building ethical, socially minded business models along the way.

 

See more of 80,000 Hours here - http://80000hours.org/

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