OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2
90 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Quest 3 Saving my Knight

Nigel Stapleton - Firefighter

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Quest 3 Saving my Knight

Firefighter Nigel Stapleton

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Quest 2. Regional Instructor Tae Kwon-Do

Quest 2. Regional Instructor Tae Kwon-Do | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it

Introducing...Jeff Dieben.

Regional Instructor Tae Kwon-Do (Central & Far North Qld)

6th Dan ITF International Instructor/Examiner. 

 

Jeff Dieben is passionate about Tae Kwon –Do

Jeff is a Regional Instructor for the ‘Queensland Self Defence and TaeKwon-DoAcademy’ (QSDTA) for Central and Far North Qld.  He also holds the esteem of being a 6th Dan ITF International Instructor and Examiner.

Jeff has been participating in this sport for the past 33 years and is also a firefighter.  This has been a life’s pursuit which has seen the involvement of his entire family. His lovely wife, who is also an instructor, has been by his side through this journey with their children in tow.  The rewards for Jeff have been immeasurable on a personal level and more broadly has provided opportunities for travel interstate and the world participating in seminars and competitions.

Jeff’s responsibility is to ensure both the philosophy and the techniques of this style of Martial Arts are passed down respectfully. 

For four nights a week, Jeff takes students from varying ages (7 to adult) and backgrounds and instructs, guides, mentors and prepares students to take on the skills and attributes of this art form to be used in life.

Students are taught to be disciplined and to develop a moral culture that can be carried through to all parts of life.

The tenets of TKD are:

*Be courteous *Integrity *Perseverance *Self-control *Indomitable spirit

For more information check out:  www.queensland-selfdefence.com.au

1800 649 549 or like them on Facebook.

Jenny Olmos's insight:

This style of martial arts is non-contact, students participate in patterns, step sparring/free sparring, self-defence routines and board breaks.

The psychosocial aspects this training hopes to develop a mindset that helps prevent antisocial behaviour, bullying and promotes tolerance and understanding.  Jeff explained that positive behavioural changes have been seen by both parents and teachers in students that were previously easily distracted or perhaps unruly.

Risk management begins when a new student signs up. Self-reporting of existing medical or physical conditions ensures the training suits the student, if not, may restrict the student from participating. 

All instructors have a first aid qualifications and a first aid kit is onsite. 

 

Indoor training:

Training occurs in school halls, a written risk assessment of the venue is conducted which is reviewed yearly or as required.

Hazards that can be encountered with indoor training are:-

*Students (kids) that have eaten too much just prior to training and become sick.

Therefore food /gum is not allowed in the Dojang –  this eliminates choking hazard.

If a student shows signs of being sick, they are taken outside for fresh air and their training is reduced or stopped.

 

Hazards that can be encountered include:

*fatigue – training is modified to suit or the student takes a break.

*heat stress – students are prevented from reaching this point, by increasing water intake and modify intensity of training.

*dehydration – increase water uptake.

*sprains, strains and muscle spasms – students are taught how to breath which improves stamina, how to balance, how to use their bodies for maximum benefit or efficiency and students must warm up an warm down and safely stretch to prevent injury.

 

Alternative venues / Outdoor events:

PPE: Sunscreen, hat, water, footwear and students own medication if required (e.g., asthma).

Dynamic risk assessments ensure that hazards are minimised when training in the outdoors, which can be the park, beach or potentially any location.  Students are made aware from the start of potential hazards and implement strategies to minimise or eliminate injury.  For example, when training at the beach Jeff advises students of heat stress – to drink water prior and during, and to train in the mornings or afternoons.  He emphasizes to students to be extra careful with foot placement when training on uneven surfaces such as the beach or park. Jeff must think for the very young students, as he explains, seven year olds do not understand the concepts of safety, and as such require a higher level of supervision as they are still developing their motor skills.

 

Hazards that can be encountered with outdoor training are:-

*Uneven surfaces

*Snakes/ spiders

*Heat

*Dehydration

*Debris, such as glass or other sharp objects.

*sprains, strains and muscle spasms.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Quest 2. Area Director Rural Fire Service Qld

Quest 2. Area Director Rural Fire Service Qld | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it

Introducing Lawrence Laing.  Area Director for Rural Fire Services Qld (Central Region)

 

Lawrence has been involved with the fire service for the past 12 years.  Originally from New Zealand, his career began as an Auxiliary fire fighter in Far North Queensland.  A specialist in rural bush fire and land management, Lawrence studies the behavior of fire and landscape while supporting and training volunteers Rural Fire volunteers.

 

In his current role as Area Director for the Rural Fire Service Queensland (RFSQ), Lawrence is responsible for an area approximately 54 Square kilometers taking in Mackay Regional Council, and portions of both Isaac and Whitsunday Regional Councils.  At the time of writing these borders are being realigned to take in all three council areas.

Lawrence manages two and half thousand volunteers as well as being the Chief Fire Warden for all 168 fire wardens under his command.     

The legislation underpinning this service is the Fire and Service Act, 1990 (QLD).

For more information on the Rural Fire Service Qld please have a look at:

www.ruralfire.qld.gov.au

 

Jenny Olmos's insight:

Hazard reduction burns peak at certain times of the year, prior to what is considered the bushfire season.

 

Currently, effective from April 1 2014, Operation Cool Burn was announced by the Commissioner. What this means is Fire Service along with other government departments and the broader community, engage in risk mitigation (hazard reduction burns) by undertaking controlled burns to reduce fire loads in preparation for a hotter climate.

 

There are four levels of volunteer brigades within the service, 1. Primary Producer. 2. Rural 3. Village and 4. iZone (which is the interface between urban and rural landscapes)

Workplace Health and Safety for 34 thousand volunteers across the state is a major challenge. 

 

Smoke alone contains approximately 2200 different chemicals; the composition can change with the type of debris burning.   As a result, the biggest safety issue is breathing or rather, not breathing in this smoke.  Volunteers wear masks to protect themselves and frequently seek out fresh air.  The hazards often discarded in the bush that contributes to acrid smoke include but not limited to; tyres, gas cylinders, ordnance, car bodies, plastics and general household rubbish.

Volunteers are encouraged to work to their limits to maintain their operational capabilities, as the following are hazards that must be constantly monitored.  Smokes gets into the lungs, permeates fabric, gets into the eyes and decreases visibility. 

 

*Radiant Heat.

Heat from flames can quickly overcome firefighters, which is why their uniforms have a chemical called ‘Proban’ infused into the fabric to make it fire retardant.  Often, volunteers can experience a sunburn type effects from radiant heat which is why individuals must monitor themselves in relation to the fire.

 

*Noise

Bushfires are noisy and have the ability to deafen out noises making communication very difficult. Not being able to hear others or the crucial changes to the fire can be dangerous. Other sources of excessive noise can be; pumps, highway traffic, graders and water bombing planes.

 

*Fire Behaviour

One of the most unique aspects of bushfires is their ability to create their own climatic/weather conditions.  This is quite important to understand and the risks in fighting bush fires are constantly monitored, as are the external and internal weather patterns and wind speed and strength.

 

*Dehydration / Fatigue

Another potential hazard is dehydrating from sweating and not replenishing water.  Or forgetting to drink on a stressful fireground.

Fatigue is of significant concern, particularly with landowners protecting their own properties. They will fight for hours often refusing to rest out of concern for their livelihoods. Hours worked is constantly monitored as a result. 

 

*Slips, trips and falls

Uneven gounds, fallen trees etc.  Also, lifting wherever possible is done by 2 people where items are heavy or awkward.  Engineering controls by introducing tools to assist in carrying objects such as electric fire hose reel retractors.

 

*Wildlife

Wildlife can be hazardous. Startled animals such as, Kangaroos have been known to jump all over fire fighters during bush fires.

 

*Aerial fire bombing

This strategy of loading 'ping pong balls' with an incendiary chemicals and dropping from a plane to conduct back burning or hazard reduction is intensely stressful and a significant risk, which have measures in place to make this task safe.

 

*Psychological

Fires are very stressful as there are many unknowns.

Landowners/ volunteer firefighters are potentially at risk. Loss of homes, livestock, source of income is distressing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Quest 2. QFES Training Officer.

Quest 2. QFES Training Officer. | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it

Introducing........Mick Thomson.

Area Training Officer for Qld Fire & Emergency Services (ex EMQ)

 

Mick Thomson is a trainer for the Emergency Services (State Emergency Services volunteers & Rural Fire Services volunteers)

In addition, Mick teaches Disaster Management to local government and non-government organizations (NGO’s) in Central Qld: Covering all aspects of Prevention, Preparedness, Response and Recovery. 

He has been doing this line of work for the past ten years.  This role holds the expectation that during times of disaster all training delivery is postponed and he assumes the role of disaster management practitioner offering guidance and advice to Police, Parks and Wildlife, Volunteer SES groups, local councils from the Whitsunday’s to Isaac and Mackay Regional Councils and non-government organizations.  Out of area deployments to other parts of QLD is also part of his role.

Mick trains emergency services volunteers in a variety of disciplines to perform search/rescue and recovery functions safely and efficiently.

His training scope covers; Safety, risk management, Road Crash Rescue (RCR), Vertical Rescue (VR), Floodboat rescue, Incident Management, Chainsaw Operations, Traffic Management, general rescue, casualty handling, operate communication, navigation, fire management, Australasian Interservice Incident Management System (AIIMS) and Disaster Management.

The major legislation underpinning these activities include: Disaster Management Act (QLD) 2011, Workplace Health & Safety Act (QLD), and the Work Health & Safety Regulation (QLD) 2011, Transport Operation (passenger Transport) Act 1994 and Maritime Safety Act (QLD) 2002.

Jenny Olmos's insight:

This dual scope environment of training and disaster management operations is a dynamic process.  No two training days are the same and no two disasters are the same.  The training of volunteers is flexible and inclusive of diverse backgrounds.  At all times safety is paramount to achieving the ultimate objectives of the safety of the residents of a community, a resilient town and volunteers who return home intact.

Mick explains that every volunteer and practitioner must risk assess their jobs, implementing strategies that mitigate against injury/damage to themselves, casualties, equipment and the environment.

 

The specific multidimensional nature of hazards encountered are too numerous to list all, but a review of the major or more unique ones will be mentioned, common to any job is fatigue, dehydration and the potential for psychological stress.

 

Landsearch Activities: 

The Australian landscape is diverse from bush, mud, dry, rainforest, beaches, mountains, water courses, ocean and air.  Hazards encountered are poisonous and stinging plants, and plants designed to trap like the aptly named “wait a-while” which will hook on to a passing animal or human and tightly hold on with painful hooks. Snakes,spiders, wild animals, ants, bees, wasps particularly important for allergy sufferers.  Uneven ground, loose or even slippery rocks, fallen trees and densely packed vegetation all pose problems. Debris from human encroachment is a problem such as disposed needles, biological waste, old cars, etc. Slips, trips and falls are common as is heat exhaustion, and bites and stings. These are managed accordingly.  From time to time as part of a landsearch activities, clandestine labs are encountered which pose unique risks from the area being booby trapped to preventing intruders its discovery to carcinogenic chemicals and the risk of explosions, safe distances are maintained the scene is preserved and handed over to the police.

 

Road Crash Rescue Activities:

Attending road crashes is highly demanding and stressful for the responder and considered a high risk activity, hazards include; vehicle types involved (fuel tankers, hybrid vehicles). Time of day, less light or night-time poses more difficulties, as does heavy rain, vehicles that ignite, or begin to effuse their contents such as a fuel tanker or even animal carriers. Hybrid vehicles differ in that they are energized with current, and the batteries contain an alkali gel of around pH12, that can cause burns on contact.  Cutting up a vehicle with heavy, loud and powerful machines (Jaws of Life) can only be used by trained personnel, with utmost care and consideration of entrapped casualties.  Slips, trips and falls also feature here, as does dehydration and the potential to develop psychological stress if the outcome is unfavourable.

      

Floodboat Operations:

Rivers, creek and partial smooth waters of the ocean pose unique hazards to the boat (equipment) and boat operator. This is one occasion where maintaining equipment will ensure fitness for purpose, as the salt environment can corrode components, rope, radios, and motor anything really. During floods the biggest threat to safety of boat and passenger comes from debris just under the surface of the water,  trees, bollards, fast flowing currents, rocks, houses in some cases.  Many times debris floats on the surface which can entangle the propeller.   Mick explains that currents are particularly hazardous as in some cases it is difficult to assess (if underwater) or if it must be crossed to save a life can be quite powerful which is where one needs to be properly trained to be skillfully reactive in boat operations.  Another important point with protracted flood events is the risk of disease from (sewerage) effluent which is common and can cause minor skin irritation to more significant infections/inflammations. 

 

Storm Operations:

Cyclonic winds as we know can disrupt life and the environment. Any number of hazards can and do appear from fallen power lines, ripped up roads, land and mudslides, fallen rocks and vegetation that can block the only road in and out of a town (eg Eungella, west of Mackay).  Fallen trees on houses is a common hazard, the chainsaw operators with full PPE work to remove this hazard which in itself also prone to noise, vibration hazards, dehydration, eye debris, fatigue, uneven grounds and competing inclement weather, lifting, bending and carrying all contain risks of injury.  At times roof tarping is required which involves climbing ladder (3 points of contact), hopping onto a roof on a harness and placing tarps.  There are procedures every step of the way here, Mick explains to ensure no one falls from heights. A further consideration with house damage is asbestos, this is risk managed according to conditions and if the risks are deemed too high, these jobs are referred to industry professionals.

 

Other hazards encountered can be:

Excessive sun exposure, (managed by hats, sunscreen, hydration, long sleeves, plenty of breaks, and seek shade when not working).  Noise from machinery, pumps, generators, chainsaws, and the normal din of worksites.  All relevant PPE is supplied where hazards cannot be engineered out.  Radiant heat from fires.   Fatigue, slips, trips and falls. High risk vertical rescue require relatively fit operators who can self-rescue and manage casualties while dangling precariously from a rope and belayed by their peers. 

 

Psychological Considerations:

Each job will be handled differently by individuals, this is where leaders must understand and recognize changes in volunteers after challenging jobs or more traumatic events.  Every job is debriefed for the operational perspectives and potentially traumatic or difficult jobs will involve a psychological debrief.  If volunteers are affected peer support up to psychologists can be made available.  The diverse membership itself can create unpleasant environments if there are too many conflicting personalities and the potential for bullying and harassment must constantly be monitored and managed. Mick explained the ‘Code of Conduct’, for all volunteers and serious breaches are performance managed. Mick explained the ‘Code of Conduct’, for all volunteers and serious breaches are performance managed.

 

Mick also pointed out that training was paramount to a safe operation. There is also extensive research and development to ensure better methods, tools and techniques are made available to mitigate against many routine and non-routine jobs.  When injuries do result, they are thoroughly investigated with the focus on causality and not ‘witch hunts’, from there control measures can be implemented to prevent future incidents.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jenny Olmos from A quest-ion of safety
Scoop.it!

Guide-preventing-responding-workplace-bullying.pdf


Via Elisa Mestroni
more...
Elisa Mestroni's curator insight, March 13, 2014 8:15 PM

From my research I believe that the primary duty of care remains the responsibility of the Person Conducting a Business or Undertaking (PCBU), and it is their legal obligation to resolve issues regarding bullying. However, it is the function of OHS to report hazards or potential hazards in the workplace. OHS professionals can provide advice to both the worker and the company and make recommendations on prevention and response procedures associated with workplace bullying.

Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

The Role of Brain Networks in Fatigue

The Role of Brain Networks in Fatigue | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Components to be found in the realms of Biology, Sociology and Psychology.
Jenny Olmos's insight:

A further look into the potential consequences of unresolved fatigue.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jenny Olmos from Visual*~*Revolution
Scoop.it!

The Science Of Happiness [infographic]

The Science Of Happiness [infographic] | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it

If you ask anybody on the street what they want most in life, they'll most likely say that they want to die happy. Most of the info on this little infographic points to one key element to staying happy: stay healthy. There’s more interesting facts on here that are worth checking out, but if you want to be happy, be healthy. 

 
Via Andrea Zeitz
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Fatigue risk management can improve workplace safety

Fatigue risk management can improve workplace safety | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Jenny Olmos's insight:

No matter how good your safety processs are compliance becomes difficult to achieve if workers are fatigued either mentally or physically.  Managing fatigue is mitigating against a human risk of harming or being harmed whilst tired or easily distracted. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Concepts of Leadership

Concepts of Leadership | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Leadership concepts that include definitions, approaches, theories, principles, attributes, and differences beteen leaders, bosses, and managers.
Jenny Olmos's insight:

It all starts from the top and filters down.  Effective leaders promote unity and purpose to achieve. 

 

My question to you, is.  What makes bad leadership?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

A Strong Core Equals A Strong Body « Sharecare.com Blog

A Strong Core Equals A Strong Body « Sharecare.com Blog | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Jenny Olmos's insight:

Consider for a moment how well you could do your job (any job) if on the first day of work you hurt your back.  

Everyone from emergency responders, nurses, labourers and even mothers picking up their babies are at risk of back strain and potentially worse.

Look after your back by strengthening your core. Whilst not hard to do, if you do no other exercise but core exercises you will increase the longevity of your back health and be able to continue to safely do your job well. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jenny Olmos from Health and Fitness Tips and Resources: Helpful information about health, fitness, workouts, weight loss, healthy eating, diet, and related wellness topics.
Scoop.it!

10-minute bouts of exercise bring health benefits

10-minute bouts of exercise bring health benefits | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it

"ACSM Fitness Resolution: Every Body Walk! Studies show that 10-minute bouts of exercise bring health benefits, and it becomes easier and more enjoyable as you fit it into your daily routine. ..."

------------------------------

Related Resource: 

GET MOVING - Walking for Weight Loss

http://firstworld.overblog.com/get-moving-walking-for-weight-loss

 

You might also like:
THE MIRACLE FAT BURNER
http://goo.gl/Zhsy4E

 

 


Via Web Buzz
Jenny Olmos's insight:

Mens sana in corpore sano.

more...
Abi Adeleke's curator insight, December 25, 2013 2:27 PM

Got 10 minutes? Let's go! #2014GymInspiration @gym2street

Jeff Angel, Bring It Home Personal Training's curator insight, March 3, 2014 10:03 AM

Can 10 minutes of exercise improve your health?  The research says yes!

Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Communication is Aid

In any emergency, be it natural disaster or man-made, people's lives are turned upside down. Knowing what's happening, where to go for assistance and who to ...
Jenny Olmos's insight:

The longest journey starts with a single step - Communication

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Quest 3 Saving my Knight: Physical Fitness

FireFighter Nigel Stapleton

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Quest 3 Saving my Knight - Fatigue

Quest 3 Saving my Knight - Fatigue | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it

Firefighter Nigel Stapleton - Fatigue

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Quest 2. Fire Fighter

Quest 2. Fire Fighter | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it

Introducing .....................Nigel Stapleton, 1st Class Firefighter, Mackay. 

 

Nigel Stapleton is a 1st class guy! 

 

As a 1st Class fire fighter in Mackay, Nigel says it’s the best job anyone can do.  For the past three and half years he has been there to help out the community in their time of need.  Nigel also proclaimed that he would be a firefighter for the rest of his life.

In his previous life Nigel was a train driver, the long hours and shift work there put him in good stead to fall into the shift work lifestyle of the fire service.  “There is a routine, and they drill into you to check your equipment”.  Nigel says he values the experience of the older firefighters and has kept a mental note of a statement once made to him by a senior officer who was teaching him the ins and outs of the vehicle check, “Whenever you check over your vehicle, imagine that you it could be your family or loved ones you will be needing to rush to, so know your vehicle inside and out and make sure everything works”.  To this day, Nigel takes pride and ownership of the trucks, their contents and fellow firefighters and is always battle ready.

Jenny Olmos's insight:

The fire service operates in a faced paced, dynamic environment where small incidents can quickly escalate into major events. It is this that Nigel drills for, to respond to and adapt to a changing environment.

OHS within the fire service begins with knowing your equipment and maintaining it in top order.  Any defective equipment is quickly identified and taken out of circulation to be replaced or fixed, this includes the vehicles, tools, chainsaws, disc cutters, radios, breathing apparatus, road crash rescue gear (RCR), pumps,  thermal imaging equipment (TIC) and even their turnout gear (the heavy yellow pants and coats).

 

As firefighters can be called upon to perform challenging and at times technically difficult work such as, swift water and vertical rescue, and in addition to this, carrying heavy or bulky equipment over difficult terrain it is part of their work and life culture to maintain a standard of peak physical fitness.  Each station is outfitted with a maintained gym where crews can go and workout during downtime.  This fitness for duty ensures every physical task performed such as, lifting, carrying, climbing, driving for long hours is ergonomically sound which in turn prevents injury.

 

The harsh reality of fire fighters today involves more vehicle accidents and other rescues than structural fires which have decreased over recent years.  At road crash rescue scenes there are several major hazards to consider and mitigate against; i.e., bodily fluids (blood, vomit etc), vehicles that have caught on fire, fire that has escaped into neighboring bush, fuel and oil spills presenting a fire and slip/trip risk, the final impact position of the vehicles and livestock involved.  Fuel tankers pose a larger risk to the firefighters, police and ambulance crews and to the environment.        

Equipment is loaded and unloaded on trucks by two wherever possible; this teamwork ensures crews do get unnecessarily fatigued which is when most accidents happen.

Climbing in and out of trucks has a procedure of its own, 3 points contact at all times getting into and out of a truck.  When exiting the truck it is backwards and never jump off.

 

Unique to Mackay Base Hospital is the addition of a new MRI machine.  Crews have familiarized themselves with the safety considerations for this piece of equipment.  Importantly, firefighters must get entry instructions from hospital staff as the highly magnetized room could rip equipment from them.  For their safety there are yellow lines delineating where they can be.

Fatigue management is vital consideration as is hours worked.  Maintaining hydration levels is promoted and managed through advice provided by the WHS officer.  When working in during hot environments (through fire or weather) heat stress can impair cognitive functions as can dehydration.  Crews are encouraged to seek shade wherever possible, and if needed are able to remove their overcoats for cooling down.

 

Psychological aspects of firefighting mean that at times traumatic scenes may impact some more than others, as such, peer supporters are promoted and also ‘activated’ to be available for psychological first aid. If further assistance is needed the service has an employee assistance program they can access called Fire care.  

Nigel says “It’s all in a days work”.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Quest 2. Recreational Aviator / Flight Instructor

Quest 2. Recreational Aviator / Flight Instructor | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it

Introducing.......Michael Brannan, Recreational Pilot & Flight Instructor

 

Michael Brannan or ‘Mick’ is passionate about flying, and teaching others to fly.

Mick is a recreational aviation flight instructor.  He has been doing this for about 5 years. 

 

An Ab Initio flight instructor in a recreational registered aircraft (which is registered with Recreational Aviation Australia RAA), less than 600kg gross takeoff (fuel and people) weight with a maximum of 2 seats. What this means Mick tells me, is that he teaches students who have no flight experience or from scratch.

 

Mick lives in Mackay but commutes to Brisbane regularly to work for Pathway Aviation in Archerfield.  Mick is also a career firefighter.  He has been doing this for the past 4 to 5 years and has loved every bit of it.  He says that he loves interacting with people and watching them achieve their goals, it fills him with pride to see that.  For Mick it’s a both challenging and rewarding.  Mick’s own goal is working towards achieving a commercial pilot rating.

Jenny Olmos's insight:

OHS is paramount in the aviation industry as small mistakes have the potential to become disastrous.

 

Preflight:

Safety considerations Mick explains begin with a preflight plan.  This includes a thorough analysis of the impending weather, the distance that is planned, the amount of passengers, the weight of the plane with cargo and passengers.  This enables calculation of fuel usage against distance to be travelled.

There is also the emergency contingency plan, which maps out the locations of alternate landing sites should something go wrong with the plane or the weather turns bad.

A Chief flying instructor at the school manages each pilot.  One of his roles is the audit of time management or flying hours for every pilot.  Each pilot is responsible for logging flying hours and these are reviewed regularly. The function of this is to mitigate against fatigue. The pilots have time constraints with the hours allowed to fly. For example, Mick explains they are not allowed more than 2 consecutive early mornings and have limited duty hours.

Fatigue can be responsible for loss of concentration, slowed cognitive functions over time which can impact spatial awareness.  These are vital for a pilot.  Other causes of fatigue or reduced functions can be from alcohol, lack of sleep and drugs in the system. The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) guidelines include: No legal drugs (that have negative effects) or illegal drugs are allowed in the system, no alcohol in the system for 10 hrs prior to flying, in addition, pilots cannot be affected by residual alcohol.

 

Student Pilots:

Also must not be under the influence or affected by drugs or alcohol and be well rested.

Eligible students must undergo assessment before being accepted as a student pilot. 

They must undertake an English assessment, to be able to read and comprehend maps and instructions.  Be able to hold a car license, and undergo a Class 1 medical test.

For safety, students’ concentration has been predetermined at 0.7 of an hour which equates to 45-50 minutes. Further to this, students flying/teaching time cannot exceed more than two lessons back to back.

Students’ learning is staged so they are not overwhelmed.

 

In the air, Mick described making the students comfortable as some tend to feel sick, as some students have thrown up mid-air.  Mick describes how would mitigate against this by doing several things;

*Monitor and assesses the student for signs of unease or distress as lessons termed “turning lessons” tend to make students nauseous.

*In this instance the lessons are transitioned back to a manageable style, or reduced time.

*Distracting students by giving them a job can ease this feeling.

*Flying in a manner that increases air flow through the cabin can increase oxygenation and thus improving the students colour.

*Biological waste (vomit) is contained in sick bags which Mick has the privilege of stating he’s never had to use personally with his students, although some have come very close.

 

Ergonomically, the seat can be adjusted by using cushions to suit the student and rudder pedals adjusted for shorter people.  On long flights, greater than 3hrs, sore backs can become problematic so there are gel seat pads that can be used to make it more comfortable.

The controls in a small craft are placed at easy reach of the pilot, making the confined space nature of the cockpit not as confining.

Ingress and egress from the plane is the same, with some agility students duck under the wing careful not to hit their heads.

 

Aircraft Maintenance:

Aircraft are shared between pilots and must be checked over at regular intervals.

Every 25 hrs the engine oil is changed.

Every 50 hrs the planes undergo a Mid-level Service.

Every 100 hrs the planes undergo a full service. This means the plane is stripped, pulled apart and every facet of the plane is checked, replaced if needed, tested and put back together again.

Re-fuelling, is a careful process as ‘avgas’ is highly flammable.  Refuellers wear protective clothing and decant fuel carefully into the plane.  Chemical spill kits are kept nearby.

 

OHS in the Air:

Noise can be hazard which is why pilots must wear headsets.  There are two varieties. 1. One style employs passive noise reduction and 2. Includes a noise cancelling function for certain frequencies.  The latter style is used more for long flights and with an instructor.

The temperature at high altitudes can become extremely cold and at lower altitudes may become hot.  There are vents that can be opened to cool a plan plus changing to a higher altitude can change the temperature by a few degrees.

Spending a minimal time on the ground will also contribute to keeping the cockpit cool.

The performance of the plane and comfort of the pilot can be made by flying early in the mornings.

Other potential hazards include, debris on the runway, birdstrikes, electrical storms, UFO abductions, cargo not fixed, and panicked student pilots.

 

When Mick talks about flying, you can see this passion in his eyes. A dedicated teacher who does everything he can to make flying a pleasurable experience.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jenny Olmos from Visual*~*Revolution
Scoop.it!

What it takes to be a great leader

There are many leadership programs available today, from 1-day workshops to corporate training programs. But chances are, these won't really help. In this clear, candid talk, Roselinde Torres describes 25 years observing truly great leaders at work, and shares the three simple but crucial questions would-be company chiefs need to ask to thrive in the future.


Via Andrea Zeitz
Jenny Olmos's insight:

I can identify poor strategies in leadership in my work circle.  It makes perfect sense to prepare yourself, your company and your team for what could be - not for what was. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

The Challenge of Hydration on SoccerNation News Soccer News

The Challenge of Hydration on SoccerNation News Soccer News | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Soccer Nutrition News: Hydration is a major topic when it comes to performing at the top of your game. But how do you keep properly hydrated? Is it as easy as drinking lots of water, or is there some actual science involved?
more...
My Soccer Nutrition's curator insight, March 9, 2014 10:38 PM

Keeping Soccer athletes hydrated is very important part of reaching your peek performance.

 

@mysportsdiet
http://mysoccernutrition.com


#mysoccernutrition 

Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Managing fatigue - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland

Fatigue management is a shared responsibility between management and workers as it involves factors both inside and outside of work. Employers and persons conducting a business or undertaking are responsible for using a risk management approach to manage fatigue.
Jenny Olmos's insight:

In this scoop WHS Qld offers plenty of advice on fatigue managment, which will be essential to the career emergency responder or to anyone who has particularly demanding work environment. 

more...
Hayden Rogers's curator insight, March 14, 2014 11:26 AM

Fatigue is a huge workplace issue. I was born and raised in a mining town and have seen first hand the affect of fatigue on friends and family. Many mine sites have stronger and stronger policies and procedures involving fatigue on site but, many other industries aren't as lucky to have this luxury. I know first hand fatigue can lead to silly mistakes. Some people argue that being heavily fatigued can be just as inflicting on the body as being intoxicated. 

Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Understanding The Stress Response: It Can Buy You Valuable Seconds

Understanding The Stress Response: It Can Buy You Valuable Seconds | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Survival in extreme situations often depends on an individuals ability to respond to the threat they are faced with.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Work stress theory and interventions: From evidence to policy - Safe Work Australia

Work stress theory and interventions: From evidence to policy - Safe Work Australia | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it
This site contains materials supporting the WHS laws including; the model WHS Act, model WHS Regulations and model Codes of Practice. Analysis of data and research relating to work health and safety and workers’ compensation is available from this site.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Behavioral Assessment and Integrity Testing: The new emerging workplace bullying issue

Behavioral Assessment and Integrity Testing: The new emerging workplace bullying issue | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Jenny Olmos's insight:

Unfortunately, this is a sad and unacceptable reality of the modern workforce.  The implications of bullying is far reaching from the indvidual's perspective - Chronic stress, low self esteem, depression, anger, poor work performance to social isolation.  The company perspective is equally affected by low or poor morale, disunity, poor productivity, paying out inflated rates of sick days which all contribute to workplace toxicity. 

Where and how does it start and when does it finish? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

47 Mind-Blowing Psychology-Proven Facts You Should Know About Yourself

47 Mind-Blowing Psychology-Proven Facts You Should Know About Yourself | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it
I’ve decided to start a series called 100 Things You Should Know about People. As in: 100 things you should know if you are going to design an effective and persuasive website, web application or software application.Or maybe just 100 things that everyone should know about humans!
Jenny Olmos's insight:

#39 — Your Mind Wanders 30% of the Time...  How do you catch the dreamy 30%'ters before they hurt themselves or someone else?

 

 

more...
Vonny~'s comment, February 28, 2014 6:52 AM
Hi Jenny .. you are getting into the swing of this .. great connection highlighted here! :)
Scooped by Jenny Olmos
Scoop.it!

Importance Of Team Building: The Benefits Of Being On The Same ...

Importance Of Team Building: The Benefits Of Being On The Same ... | OHS Quest : Social, Physical & Mental Wellness in the Workplace Plus Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Team building is something that can help bring one element businesses need more than anything: Trust. How that's defined involves looking at methods of team building and everyone rallying for the same cause.
Jenny Olmos's insight:

Humanity have only each other to achieve greatness, how great the achievement, reflects how great the team!

more...
No comment yet.