Project-Based Learning (PBL)
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5 Strategies To Avoid With Difficult Students; Plus One Radio Interview — Smart Classroom Management

5 Strategies To Avoid With Difficult Students; Plus One Radio Interview — Smart Classroom Management | Project-Based Learning (PBL) | Scoop.it
Five of the most frequently recommended strategies for dealing with difficult students can actually cause an increase or a worsening of misbehavior. Which begs the question: If they cause behavior to get worse, then why are they recommended? Well, for […]
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Positive, Not Punitive, Classroom Management Tips

Positive, Not Punitive, Classroom Management Tips | Project-Based Learning (PBL) | Scoop.it
This article is adapted from Larry's new book, Self-Driven Learning: Teaching Strategies for Student Motivation.

Let's start with a question I've been asked on more than one occasion.

"I know my co
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SHSU students discuss voice and choice in PBL - YouTube

SHSU students were immersed into project based learning for a semester. In this video they discuss their experiences and feelings on the voice and choice asp...
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               A couple students in this video describe how it can be difficult to “handle all the freedom” in PBL*, something that is strongly relatable for me. This is because I like to know exactly how my work will develop, and feel unsure of what to do when there are few "guidelines*." I become doubtful of all my ideas and ironically* feel more pressure to “get the right answers.” Though some students, like myself, may feel “paralyzed”* by so much freedom, I think this sense of pressure can fade*. Once they have a “break”* from specific expectations and examples* which they seemingly have no choice but to follow, they can focus on the fun and possibilities* before them. As a teacher, I want to help students with their fears*, but also reassure them about the rewards of freedom*.

 

*Sources:

-EDCI397 large class and small group discussions

-EDCI397 readings and discussions

-"Supporting information" and general ideas from other settings

-terms from this article

-Materials and discussions from Education classes at UMD

 

 

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Yong Zhao: PBL Develops Students' Creative Confidence

Yong Zhao: PBL Develops Students' Creative Confidence | Project-Based Learning (PBL) | Scoop.it
Suzie Boss (@suzieboss on Twitter) is a journalist and author of Reinventing Project-Based Learning: Your Field Guide to Real-World Projects in the Digital Age. She's also a regular blogger on Edu
Olivia Jackson's insight:

             This article’s emphasis on “networking” and encouraging other educators to do PBL is similar to some of the emphases in EDCI397. In class, we often talk about tweeting, ways to “develop our Personal Learning Networks,” and the usefulness of discussion circles*. In relation to PBL, "communication"* is important during the process and also in initiating it*. From personal experience, I can understand this significance. Some of the presentations I have given and some of my discussions with classmates have been "very fruitful*."  I have learned about others’ ideas, “expanded” my own, and became more confident in myself* (an experience mentioned in this and other articles). It seems that the more you communicate, the more receptive and comfortable you can become doing it*. As someone who is more shy and inclined to work independently, I might initially distance myself from these types of communication. Such activities, however, can prove themselves as informative and as an opportunity to appreciate the insights of new friends*. 

 

*Sources:

-"Emphases" were stated in EDCI397 syllabus and objectives; stated by instructor; and made in our readings and discussions. Other topics from class also related to these ideas.

-EDCI397 discussions and readings (assigned and personally chosen)

-EDCI280 materials

-specific words from this article 

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Getting Started with Project-Based Learning (Hint: Don't Go Crazy)

Getting Started with Project-Based Learning (Hint: Don't Go Crazy) | Project-Based Learning (PBL) | Scoop.it
Before the start of the school year, many of us want to use the remaining weeks of summer to learn some new skills -- such as project-based learning (PBL). One of the things we stress for new PBL p
Olivia Jackson's insight:

             One connection I made to this article was the idea of “starting small.” When I begin a project, I oftentimes identify the different steps to completing it. The whole project seems too challenging and intimidating for me to initially handle, but identifying these steps makes me feel like I have more control*. Knowing how the project-process can be overwhelming, I strongly agree with this tip. I also see its importance because some students may not “be used to”* teachers who emphasize process; the whole notion of PBL may make these students feel even more confused and frightened.  If the teacher is emphasizing many disciplines, the students face an even broader scope of possibilities they may not yet feel comfortable approaching. In addition, because teachers have so many standards and personal teaching goals*, and such a relatively short amount of time to teach, they may feel the need to “go big.” Remembering to “start small”* becomes even more important when teachers feel this pressure.

                The advice to “Concentrate the learning on one subject rather than multiple disciplines” also connected to EDCI397, but this connection seemed to be more of a “mismatch.” While our class discussions and readings seemed to stress the importance of “interdisciplinary” learning, this advice appeared to restrict it. After reflecting, however, I noted that different disciplines have a tendency to “naturally” be drawn* into the process of completing a project. Though a teacher may not name all the disciplines that will be involved in a project, thus overwhelming the students, he or she can still comment on their presence in the students’ work.

 

*Sources:

-EDCI397 readings (assigned and personally chosen) and discussions

-information from other classes

-Educational Testing and Measurement: Classroom Application and Practice, by Tom Kubiszyn and Gary D. Borich

 

 

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Setting and Achieving High Expectations

Setting and Achieving High Expectations | Project-Based Learning (PBL) | Scoop.it
By making classroom management a priority in your teaching, students are able to get the most of themselves and you. Hear from one teacher who believes this, and shows us how it all starts in the first day of school.
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Keep It Real - YouTube

This video combines fresh animation and lively presentation by Sam Seidel, author of the book Hip Hop Genius, about the need to "keep it real" in school with...
Olivia Jackson's insight:

                  This video powerfully describes how schools can “strip students of their individuality.” Hearing this, I considered how students are even expected to "connect"* to learning. “Stripping students of their individuality” makes learning unenjoyable, makes students feel powerless, and is generally destructive*; students are not being guided in their development, but discouraged*.  In my classroom, I do not want students to feel this way. The video inspired me to support and encourage students in being who they truly are, instead of people who drop their real interests and personality in the classroom*.  A quote I found especially important was from Isaiah, who said “When you get to actually see…how cool different parts of science can be, it just makes you want to continue to learn about it.”  I was really excited to hear this because he was showing motivation* to learn even more. Learning was something he wanted to continue in “real life,” thus making his educational experience actually useful*. His project connected to who he was as an individual*, and helped him "build" his knowledge and interest*—not strip it away. 

 

*Sources:

-EDCI397 class discussions and readings

-EDCI443 and EDCI280 materials

-MUED155 discussions and materials written/provided by Kevin Fletcher

-other UMD Education classes

 

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High Tech High Videos - Transformed by Technology

High Tech High Videos - Transformed by Technology | Project-Based Learning (PBL) | Scoop.it
Transformed by Technology, An edutopia video about technology in education.
Olivia Jackson's insight:

             This video, which discusses PBL and some of the ways it uses technology, awakened me even more to the importance of applying learning*. Sometimes I become so focused on assignments themselves that I only worry about the grade I will be receiving. The criteria I need to meet and the challenges I need to handle all become centered on earning a grade*.  When one of the speakers in the video contrasted what High Tech High Students are doing with “memorizing 3,000 biology words to prepare for the AP exam,” I was reminded of the sadness behind this mindset.  As suggested in a film called "The Race to Nowhere," and as I can relate to, students can become so focused on these memorization tasks that they do not stop to change their ways* and build a life* that they can truly enjoy.  When I do consider this mindset*, I realize how students become negligent of the gains and contributions that are involved in “the learning experience*.”  By discussing the many ways that High Tech High students “are assessed on an ongoing basis” (emphasis added), the video helped me see the kind of student, learner, and teacher I want to be*.

                This person who I want to be is someone who treats learning as something that is "ongoing*," and who can remind myself of this when the pressure of grading and designing specific lessons might seem to be “all important” in themselves*.  By using PBL, I can try to prevent myself and my students from neglecting the importance and joy of learning. I especially like how the students in this video completed “Presentations of Learning,” in which they reviewed and explained the relevance of what they had learned. This really seems to reflect the importance of applying what has been learned, and not just hearing that you will eventually appreciate its relevance “someday.*" Students are not simply told what to do and what they will learn, but rather treated as intelligent, "engaged" learners who can "make connections" and propose new ideas themselves* (Asia Society). In addition, they can take some responsibility in understanding the relevance of their projects*, and perhaps see applications that other classmates and teachers may not have considered*.

               

*Sources:

-EDCI397 readings (including those from Asia Society) and discussions

-EDMS410 materials/discussion

-UMD College of Education handbooks and policies also supported ideas

-Other educational classes

-Ideas heard in other settings

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Project Based Learning vs. Problem Based Learning vs. XBL | Blog | Project Based Learning | BIE

Project Based Learning vs. Problem Based Learning vs. XBL | Blog | Project Based Learning | BIE | Project-Based Learning (PBL) | Scoop.it
Olivia Jackson's insight:

               Because of the many disciplines covered, the many topics to choose, and the different approaches to take, Project Based Learning can be "overwhelming*." This article manages to clarify* what Project Based Learning is, but also discusses aspects that I myself and others may not have known about (XBLs, for example).  By noting the many XBLs and categorizing them as types of Project Based Learning, the article taught me specific “focuses”* I could use. Looking at the list of XBLs, I can choose a type of learning and develop a "Project Based Learning-oriented"* project from it.

                I also appreciate how the article says that Project Based Learning may be difficult in a math setting. It didn’t “completely dismiss Project Based Learning values*,” but was realistic* in explaining why Problem Based Learning may be "better-suited"* for math class.  This information helped me realize that I can question Project Based Learning’s "suitability"* at times, and still "honor" the goals behind it*. In addition, this information reminds teachers that they should "think through" the activities they plan and acknowledge the challenges that may come about*. This is something else that future teachers need to remember when exposed to so many new strategies and ideas* that may initially seem to have no limitations or shortcomings*.  

 

*Sources:

-EDCI397 discussions and readings (assigned and personally chosen)

-Ideas discussed in other settings

-EDMS410 materials

-EDCI461 materials/discussions with Rose Codling 

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