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Global CO2 emissions

Animated time-lapse video of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in map form, spanning the 18th century until this current first decade of the 21st centur...

 

This is not a complete data set, but the video still shows the striking connection between CO2 emissions and  the historical geography of industrialization.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 2:21 PM
I'd love to take credit for this, but I didn't create this video, but am simply sharing a resource that I found online with the broader community. Follow the YouTube link to see info about the creator there (Cuagau1).
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 11:41 AM
Frightening and guilt inducing. The US and Europe the biggest historical violators, plus living in the northeastern part of the country which shows the highest concentrations.
Rafael CAYUELA's curator insight, February 3, 2014 3:18 PM

Interesting and well done..

Rescooped by Lainie Duro from Geography Education
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Walk Appeal

Walk Appeal | Social and economic justice | Scoop.it
Walk Appeal promises to be a major new tool for understanding and building walkable places, and it explains several things that were heretofore either contradictory or mysterious.

 

What is a reasonable distance to walk around town?  Research shows that cities with improved sidewalks, less parking lots, attractive storefronts and other amenities that encourage walking.  If  walking the urban environment is and of itself an experience worth having and makes the person feel like a flâneur, experiencing the city on a deeper level, automotive transport goes down and walking goes up.  Urban infrastructure is more important for most people than distance in deciding whether to get in the car or walk down the street (for distances under 2 miles).   Bottom line: neighborhoods that have an attractive sense of place are more walkable.


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Rise of Residential Segregation by Income

Rise of Residential Segregation by Income | Social and economic justice | Scoop.it

"Residential segregation by income has increased during the past three decades across the United States and in 27 of the nation’s 30 largest major metropolitan area, according to a new analysis of census tract and household income data by the Pew Research Center.  The analysis finds that 28% of lower-income households in 2010 were located in a majority lower-income census tract, up from 23% in 1980, and that 18% of upper- income households were located in a majority upper-income census tract, up from 9% in 1980."  This interactive map allows the user to explore the 10 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. To read the article associated with this map, see: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2012/08/01/the-rise-of-residential-segregation-by-income/


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