social accountability
279 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Daraja.net
Scoop.it!

It's time NGOs admit aid isn't going to 'save' Africa

It's time NGOs admit aid isn't going to 'save' Africa | social accountability | Scoop.it
The UK is a world leader in development aid. It's also a leader in greenhouse gas emissions, tax haven networks, and taking corporate profits out of Africa – which cause far more poverty there than aid relieves. Yet, the continent is often portrayed as "needing our help" and the question we must answer is what role have international NGOs – including my own, Health Poverty Action – played in portraying Africa as a continent in need of help?

Last week, along with 12 other UK and African NGOs, we published research that attempts to challenge the dominant narrative around aid and development. Our report quantifies the total resource flows in and out of Africa. It shows that Africa is losing £192bn to the rest of the world each year, while only £134bn flows in. This means Africa suffers a net loss of £58bn a year.

And against the £192bn annual losses, aid puts back less than £30bn. It's a tiny part of the picture – and clearly no solution to the regular and systematic impoverishment of a continent. Yet raising money, whether as government aid or charity donations, is what most development NGOs bang on about more than anything else.

This distorted communication implies aid is the answer. But the true figures highlight the dishonesty of the aid narrative, which portrays Africa as the grateful beneficiary of the rich world's generosity, and its hope for the future resting on how charitable we choose to be. To reinforce this perception – or to fail to challenge it – is to perpetuate a lie, and one that causes profound damage to the cause of poverty eradication.

First, it undermines public solidarity. Is it any wonder that the public have become tired and disillusioned when for years they have been told their donations and taxes are alleviating poverty in Africa, yet an end to poverty is nowhere in sight?

Second, it re-enforces power imbalances between north and south – consolidating perceptions of the poor and unproductive Africans dependent on their northern 'saviours'.

Worst of all, it diverts attention from the real issue – that the UK plays a key role in the theft of Africa's resources. Through the actions of its inadequately regulated multinational companies, its contributions to climate change, giving parts of its aid as loans that contribute to the debt crisis, and its network of tax havens through which it facilitates the looting of billions from Africa each year.

As NGOs we have constantly reinforced and validated this narrative. There has been – and is – an overwhelming tendency in the sector to lead with a focus on aid: how much it should be and what it should be spent on. These debates came to a head in the run-up to the 2013 budget, when (despite the budget being condemned by UK poverty groups) the international NGO sector warmly applauded the Chancellor for committing to meet the 0.7 target – a target that did nothing to change the UK's role in creating that poverty in the first place.

By holding this tiny gesture up as a heroic victory, the sector reinforced the perception that aid is the key tool in the fight against poverty, and wrongly validated the UK government's self-proclaimed image as the heroic saviour of the poor.

We (and I repeat, I'm including myself and Health Poverty Action too) have become part of the problem. Speaking up about resources between Africa and the rich world is not just a call to action to government, but also to ourselves.

So what do we do about it?

To start with, we need to end our obsession with 0.7%. With little time and space to talk about global poverty, when we get the chance we need to focus on what can really make poverty history. And that's not aid.

We have to examine our communications with the public, and be honest about what £3 a month can and can't do. We have a duty to those we purport to work on behalf of, and to our own public, to tell the truth. And the truth is the UK takes far more from Africa than it gives in aid. Africa subsidises us, not the other way around. The solution is to stop those losses, that drain of resources, not divert attention away from it by demands for aid and charity appeals.

We need to look at our own internal structures, policies and practices – in our campaign collations, and inside our organisations. We can't expect to change the power imbalances that create mass poverty in the world while retaining similar imbalances within our own partnerships.

Finally, the sector needs to shift the development debate to holding our government to account for its role in the global poverty. There are already impressive campaigns on tax and climate change – the sector needs to unite behind these. Yet challenging the government on their actions, while simultaneously congratulating them for their aid just doesn't make sense. It is the paradox at the very heart of the sector that undermines all that we are trying to achieve. Justice for Africa requires action to stop the resources being taken out. Let's focus on that.

Martin Drewry is director of Health Poverty Action. Along with others he's set up the Progressive Development Forum. Follow @HealthPoverty on Twitter

Via Firoze Manji
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Daraja.net
Scoop.it!

Where everyone in the world is migrating—in one gorgeous chart- and it's not Africans migrating north!

Where everyone in the world is migrating—in one gorgeous chart- and it's not Africans migrating north! | social accountability | Scoop.it

There’s a huge circulation of migrants among sub-Saharan African countries.This migration dwarfs the number leaving Africa, but the media pay more attention the latter because of the austerity-driven immigration debates in Europe.

+

 


Via Firoze Manji
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Daraja.net
Scoop.it!

USA/Africa: Military Perspectives

Last week the U.S. Department of Defense released the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR), outlining the overall strategic perspectives for the U.S. military for the next four years. The release came together with White House release of the government's proposed fiscal year 2015 budget. Neither the budget nor the QDR provide details about Africa, but the ratio of proposed spending totals is revealing. The proposed budget for peacekeeping, which falls under the Department of State, is $2.5 billion, while the budget for the Department of Defense is $496 billion, almost two hundred times as great.


Via Firoze Manji
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Daraja.net
Scoop.it!

Large land deals reportedly fruitless

Large land deals reportedly fruitless | social accountability | Scoop.it
A new report by the International Institute for Environment and Development about large-scale land deals in Ethiopia states that allocating land to investors has not shown a lot of benefits.

Via Firoze Manji
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Daraja.net
Scoop.it!

A HAIR-RAISING VIDEO EXPOSE: "Stealing Africa - Why Poverty? How Much Profit Is Enough"

 

v

                                      STEALING AFRICA:

        WHY POVERTY? HOW MUCH PROFIT IS ENOUGH? (58:27)

Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa and the global system.

Rüschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNYemuiAOfU

 

 

                                                     WATCH

                                     "THE LOCUST EFFECT" (49:16)

                   CHANGING THE CONVERSATION ON POVERTY"

                                  Published on Feb 20, 2014

"Time To Address This Plague of Predatory Violence Amongst The Poor"

                       https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY0FRy4JLYo

          Why We Can't End Poverty Until We Change the Justice System

                                 

Gary Haugen and Victor Boutros's "The Locust Effect: Why the End of Poverty Requires the End of Violence" focuses on the central role of violence in perpetuating poverty, and shows that if any headway is to be made, this issue has to become a top priority for policymakers. Simply put, if people aren't safe, nothing else matters. Shipping grain to the poor, helping them vote, or assisting their efforts to start a farm is irrelevant. Whatever material improvements we provide will simply wash away in the face of the corrupt police forces, out-of-control, armies, private militias, organized criminals, and — not least — failed justice systems that plague countries, especially poor countries. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY0FRy4JLYo

 

- ▶ "THE LOCUST EFFECT" WEBSITE: http://www.thelocusteffect.com/

FOLLOW: Intl Justice Mission ‏@IJM

FOLLOW: Gary Haugen ‏@garyhaugen

 

 

- ▶ FOOD AID FOR THE 21st CENTURY:  MEETING THE OBJECTIVE OR FEEDING THE CORPORATE COFFERS? http://sco.lt/6bJSgD

 

 

                                                        VIDEO: (48:00)

                             "WHO PROFITS FROM POVERTY?" -

                                     DOING GOOD RESPONSIBLY

                                             http://sco.lt/6VZEDB

 

 

                                                        VIDEO

            THE TRUE STORY OF CHEVRON'S ECUADOR DISASTER

                                             http://sco.lt/6lQyYb

 

- ▶ SHOULD COMPANIES COMPENSATE SOCIETY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DESTRUCTION FROM WHICH THEY PROFIT? http://sco.lt/5x2tqz

 

 

 

 

 

 

.


Via pdjmoo, Firoze Manji
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Patrick Osodo
Scoop.it!

COMMENTARY: Keynesians' liberal economic days are gone (Part ...

COMMENTARY: Keynesians' liberal economic days are gone (Part ... | social accountability | Scoop.it
Therefore, reducing inequality via appropriate minimum wage parameters is an important equation to boost economic growth, increase demand, and to have policies that reinforce the links between improved productivity and wages, reducing ...
Patrick Osodo's insight:

In case some of you did not know! 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

The future of food

The future of food | social accountability | Scoop.it

When three continents witnessed food riots in 2007 and 2008, we saw the international food system is not as stable as it looks. There’s unprecedented competition for food due to population growth and changing diets. Experts predict that by 2050, if things don't change, we will see mass starvation across the world.

In this documentary, George Alagiah travelled the world to unravel the complicated web of links that binds the world's food together, bringing it from farm to table. It reveals a growing global food crisis that could affect the planet in the years ahead. What can we do to avert this?


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
aanve's curator insight, February 16, 2014 9:53 PM

www.aanve.com

 

RuthHoward's curator insight, February 17, 2014 6:38 AM

BBC doco link below regarding overconsumption on the one hand and inability to maintain the enormous variety and stocks of food that the recent food markets have enjoyed into our future. I'm a meat eater BTW. I'm not advocating everyone stop eating meat, although some do. But I do think its a worthy problem to help solve.
There will be so many solutions already being developed, how to cultivate and develop a long term plan to develop diversification of crops not reliant upon heavy oil and water production and use, that sustain populations through unpredictable climate changes with responsive agility to markets? In my mind a plan that doesn't rely on super farms, but responds to the small farmer and the local market as much as to export demand is preferable and more resilient. On that note I know the robots cometh. How to factor all of those exponential technological leaps in, to include them but not at human expense.

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20140206-the-future-of-food

My notes here. Earth Policy Institute Lester Brown foresees food security as the number one challenge for affluent and non affluent countries. He's been an environmental and agricultural analyst for 50 years.

Todays modern farming techniques wont feed us by 2050 unless we double productivity/yield. The finite arable land wont support this.
In addition changing weather is destined to reduce all crop yields world wide which will increase food prices.

-Richard Warburton head of Bidwells Agribusiness predicts food and water wars.

-Maasai Chief Saamy Ole Terakuai states weather has changed. He cant use his cattle for sale, for food, nor for milk, nor use their hides. Based upon Kenya, Australia in particular is at risk.

-Waitrose Farmer UK recounts volatility in grain market in part due to climate changes.
-Oil is used in intensive agriculture for fuel, fertilisers, pesticides, packaging, processing. 100g of cheese requires 140ml of oil. One tomato grown in a greenhouse uses more than a third of a litre of oil. Oil prices inflate food prices let alone affect food production.
Cuba's economy collapsed due to their reliability upon oil. A fuel shock fuels a food shock.
A very important part of this discussion documents that fuel crops (biofuels) are replacing food crops! At huge cost to locals, workers and future food security. Demonstrating that competition between fuels (cars) and food (for people) needs monitoring, especially as it is further exacerbating the divisions between rich and poor, developed and undeveloped worlds.

-Water is then tackled as a diminishing resource. Obviously essential for food production.

-Overfishing is next. World stocks of seafood could collapse by 2048. 90% of bottom fish (bottom trawls) are already gone! 80% of UK fish species are under threat. Meanwhile the market demand for fish in the UK is greater than ever, sourcing from outside including poorer countries such as Senegal, who themselves have food shortages. Senegalese are forced to share their waters with modern european fleets-Trawlers. Actionaid who monitor overfishing, observe the unlimited trawling by europeans who are profiteering from and at the expense of the Senegalese. 3/4 global fish stock are overexploited.

-Milk and meat consumption are expanding unsustainably as developing world's incomes rise. The film states that there's not enough land to produce the meat that both the developed and developing world require. 2.3kg of grain to produce 1 kilo of chicken, 15kg of grain to produce 1 kilo of beef.

 

Celest Ybarra's curator insight, March 29, 2014 9:25 PM

Title: The Future of Food

Author: BBC

Main Idea: Prediction that if eating habits don't change now, there will be a mass food scarce in the future

Summary:

1) The world is constantly changing and evolving over time, and if things don't change soon then we could be in serious trouble

2) A growing global crisis means that's there's competition for food and could affect the planet years ahead

3) Since food has become a commodity in other countries it makes it hard to believe that we could possibly run out in the future

Opinion: No, its factual.

Question: Why do researchers believe this theory? How can we help change this idea?

Is this article important to science?: Yes, because it can help us figure out how to not make this come true since food is such an important factor, and key, to our survival.

Source: http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20140206-the-future-of-food

Scooped by Patrick Osodo
Scoop.it!

Improving Service Delivery in Pakistan, One Text Message at a Time ...

Improving Service Delivery in Pakistan, One Text Message at a Time ... | social accountability | Scoop.it
From containing dengue epidemics, to tracking absenteeism among public teachers and doctors, ICT is breaking the monopoly of information held by local government officials – and in the process, improving public performance and service delivery.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Life @ Work
Scoop.it!

The Rules For Being Human

The Rules For Being Human | social accountability | Scoop.it
9 rules for being human – handed down from ancient sanskrit
You will receive a body.
You will learn lessons.
There are no mistakes, only lessons.
A lesson is repeated until it is learned.
Learning lessons does not end.

Via Barb Jemmott
Patrick Osodo's insight:
Kinda like that neither there nor here bit!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Patrick Osodo
Scoop.it!

Extending a hand or raising a fist to the state? | openDemocracy

The optimistic view sees ICTs as generating countless possibilities for meaningful, spontaneous political participation of everyday citizens armed with smartphones and tablets – thereby expanding political, social, and economic freedom, enhancing...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

How Flexible Work Culture can make Business more Social

How Flexible Work Culture can make Business more Social | social accountability | Scoop.it
How Flexible Work Culture Can Make Business More Social
Forbes
I couldn't believe that a talent hungry business wouldn't consider her as a candidate, simply because she needed a small degree of flexibility.

Via TechinBiz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Life @ Work
Scoop.it!

9 Things Happy, Successful People Choose to Ignore

9 Things Happy, Successful People Choose to Ignore | social accountability | Scoop.it

The president and co-founder of a local charity that directly cares for homeless people in our area is a 38-year-old musician and tattoo artist who’s covered from head to toe with tattoos and piercings, and has long brown dreadlocks that dangle below his waistline.  He’s been running the charity since he was 20 and has helped hundreds of people get back on their feet, including a woman I know personally who is now a successful entrepreneur.


Via Barb Jemmott
more...
Helen Teague's curator insight, February 10, 2014 9:16 PM

My favorite part of the article: "When you spend too much time concentrating on everyone else’s perception of you, or who everyone else wants you to be, you eventually forget who you truly are.  So don’t fear the judgments of others; you know in your heart who you are and what’s true to you.  You don’t have to be someone else to impress and inspire people.  Let them be impressed and inspired by the real YOU.  Honestly, whatdoes life matter if you lose yourself along the way?  Even your mentors should teach you HOW to think, not WHAT to think.  So if someone – anyone – is belittling your truth, it might be time to turn the other way."

Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Daraja.net
Scoop.it!

Gado: Goodluck Jonathan increases security ... For himself!

Gado: Goodluck Jonathan increases security ... For himself! | social accountability | Scoop.it

Via Firoze Manji
Patrick Osodo's insight:

Any wonder the girls are still out there! 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Tools, Methods and Measurements that i us in my M&E Work
Scoop.it!

Measuring Success Toolkit

Measuring Success Toolkit | social accountability | Scoop.it

Via Justus Kamwesigye
more...
Justus Kamwesigye's curator insight, April 25, 2014 10:17 AM
Using Data for Health Program Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Daraja.net
Scoop.it!

Revolutionary Democracy, Class-Consciousness, and Cross-Class Movement Building: Lessons from Amílcar Cabral - Organizing Upgrade

Revolutionary Democracy, Class-Consciousness, and Cross-Class Movement Building: Lessons from Amílcar Cabral - Organizing Upgrade | social accountability | Scoop.it
This essay is published in the book "Claim No Easy Victories: The Legacy of Amilcar Cabral," published by CODESRIA, Senegal, available in the US at P...

Via Firoze Manji
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Daraja.net
Scoop.it!

Market Supremacy: Why We Need to Rethink the Idea of Corporations

Market Supremacy: Why We Need to Rethink the Idea of Corporations | social accountability | Scoop.it
Current notions of the market and economy tend to put an inconvenient cover on the markets workings, especially the role of corporations in the dynamics of the market. A new lens is required to unpack what corporations are, how their influence works, their tax structures and what their impact is on markets and the politics between states and citizens. We have moved far from the mundane idea that corporate success is the result of a single ingenious entrepreneur, hard work, innovation and tenacity. This is pure fiction.

Via Firoze Manji
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Daraja.net
Scoop.it!

A HAIR-RAISING VIDEO EXPOSE: "Stealing Africa - Why Poverty? How Much Profit Is Enough"

 

v

                                      STEALING AFRICA:

        WHY POVERTY? HOW MUCH PROFIT IS ENOUGH? (58:27)

Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa and the global system.

Rüschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNYemuiAOfU

 

 

                                                     WATCH

                                     "THE LOCUST EFFECT" (49:16)

                   CHANGING THE CONVERSATION ON POVERTY"

                                  Published on Feb 20, 2014

"Time To Address This Plague of Predatory Violence Amongst The Poor"

                       https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY0FRy4JLYo

          Why We Can't End Poverty Until We Change the Justice System

                                 

Gary Haugen and Victor Boutros's "The Locust Effect: Why the End of Poverty Requires the End of Violence" focuses on the central role of violence in perpetuating poverty, and shows that if any headway is to be made, this issue has to become a top priority for policymakers. Simply put, if people aren't safe, nothing else matters. Shipping grain to the poor, helping them vote, or assisting their efforts to start a farm is irrelevant. Whatever material improvements we provide will simply wash away in the face of the corrupt police forces, out-of-control, armies, private militias, organized criminals, and — not least — failed justice systems that plague countries, especially poor countries. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JY0FRy4JLYo

 

- ▶ "THE LOCUST EFFECT" WEBSITE: http://www.thelocusteffect.com/

FOLLOW: Intl Justice Mission ‏@IJM

FOLLOW: Gary Haugen ‏@garyhaugen

 

 

- ▶ FOOD AID FOR THE 21st CENTURY:  MEETING THE OBJECTIVE OR FEEDING THE CORPORATE COFFERS? http://sco.lt/6bJSgD

 

 

                                                        VIDEO: (48:00)

                             "WHO PROFITS FROM POVERTY?" -

                                     DOING GOOD RESPONSIBLY

                                             http://sco.lt/6VZEDB

 

 

                                                        VIDEO

            THE TRUE STORY OF CHEVRON'S ECUADOR DISASTER

                                             http://sco.lt/6lQyYb

 

- ▶ SHOULD COMPANIES COMPENSATE SOCIETY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DESTRUCTION FROM WHICH THEY PROFIT? http://sco.lt/5x2tqz

 

 

 

 

 

 

.


Via pdjmoo, Firoze Manji
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Patrick Osodo
Scoop.it!

Leveraging of Technology for Greater Transparency and ...

Leveraging of Technology for Greater Transparency and ... | social accountability | Scoop.it
Keeping this in mind there has been a constant endeavour by the Vigilance department of Central Coal Fields Ltd., Ranchi to augment transparency, efficiency and accountability by leveraging of technology as per the mandate of the ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Life @ Work
Scoop.it!

How do you listen?

How do you listen? | social accountability | Scoop.it

When you are willing to listen there's an untold amount of knowledge, experience and perspective just waiting to be shared. From the person who serves you coffee in the morning to the colleague at work for whom we have neither patience nor time, to the three-year old just starting to figure out how to express their thoughts. 


Via Barb Jemmott
more...
Carolyn Williams's curator insight, February 20, 2014 6:42 AM

This week has been a huge learning curve for me. Those you are closest to ...your family, friends and work colleagues can have the least patience. Sad

Helen Teague's curator insight, February 22, 2014 12:43 PM

Listening is an often overlooked skill in group dynamics and PBL that would benefit from mini-lessons or mini-reminders.

Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Life @ Work
Scoop.it!

How do you listen?

How do you listen? | social accountability | Scoop.it

When you are willing to listen there's an untold amount of knowledge, experience and perspective just waiting to be shared. From the person who serves you coffee in the morning to the colleague at work for whom we have neither patience nor time, to the three-year old just starting to figure out how to express their thoughts. 


Via Barb Jemmott
more...
Carolyn Williams's curator insight, February 20, 2014 6:42 AM

This week has been a huge learning curve for me. Those you are closest to ...your family, friends and work colleagues can have the least patience. Sad

Helen Teague's curator insight, February 22, 2014 12:43 PM

Listening is an often overlooked skill in group dynamics and PBL that would benefit from mini-lessons or mini-reminders.

Scooped by Patrick Osodo
Scoop.it!

Open Data:Powering new socio-economic growth, job creation and Innovation-Day 4- 31 Oct 2013

Open Data represents a major, global mega trend for improved Governance, transparency and innovation. Open data initiatives not only improve access to data b...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from visualizing social media
Scoop.it!

INFOGRAPHIC: The risk of posting in social networks

INFOGRAPHIC: The risk of posting in social networks | social accountability | Scoop.it
INFOGRAPHIC: The risk of posting in social networks. You have the right to remain private. Anything you post can and will be used against you.

Via Lauren Moss
more...
Gloria Ross Musgrove's curator insight, March 2, 2014 4:28 PM

Investigating and bringing into laws different Cyber crimes.

Kaitlyn Kaminski's curator insight, March 13, 2014 5:13 PM

Something that students should know.

Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, September 3, 2014 2:56 AM

Welcome to Investors Europe Mauritius Stock Brokers

@investorseurope Online Trading Paradigm

@offshorebroker Nominee Trading Accounts
http://www.investorseurope.net/en/managing-director 
http://www.investorseurope.net/en/nominee-accounts

Download Offshore Trading DEMO: http://www.investorseurope.net/offshoretraderdemo.html

WebTrader DEMO : http://webtrader.investors-europe.com/iedemo/desktop.html

Mobile Trader DEMO : http://webtrader.investors-europe.com/iedemo/mobile.html

Tablet Trader DEMO : http://webtrader.investors-europe.com/iedemo/tablet.html

Desktop DEMO : http://www.investors-europe.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/iemt4setup.exe

https://www.facebook.com/globalstockbrokers

Rescooped by Patrick Osodo from Technology in Business Today
Scoop.it!

How Flexible Work Culture can make Business more Social

How Flexible Work Culture can make Business more Social | social accountability | Scoop.it
How Flexible Work Culture Can Make Business More Social
Forbes
I couldn't believe that a talent hungry business wouldn't consider her as a candidate, simply because she needed a small degree of flexibility.

Via TechinBiz
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Patrick Osodo
Scoop.it!

Implementing Smarter Cities Through Better Governance | The ...

Implementing Smarter Cities Through Better Governance | The ... | social accountability | Scoop.it
Metropolitan regions have grown a lot in size and complexity during the past 150 years but still lack mechanisms for addressing the multidisciplinary issues of sustainable development; they need better governance structures to be able to take a...
more...
No comment yet.