Soccer is the sport
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Soccer is the sport
I love this sport and i want to be a soccer player when im older
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Messi- Biography

Messi- Biography | Soccer is the sport | Scoop.it

The 2009 FIFA Player of the Year and European Footballer of the Year Lional Messi is fast, elusive, mesmerising. Nominated by Maradona as successor to his No. 10 Argentina shirt,

The 2009 FIFA Player of the Year and European Footballer of the Year Lional Messi is fast, elusive, mesmerising. Nominated by Maradona as successor to his No. 10 Argentina shirt, he is already set for football divinity. At only 22 Messi is widely regarded as the planet's most naturally gifted player, a hero in Barcelona and Argentina and the envy of all other teams. He won the 2009 Ballon d'Or with 240 more votes than second-placed Cristiano Ronaldo the highest-ever margin. Luca Caioli draws on numerous exclusive testimonies to tell Messi's story: his parents and extended family; his coaches at Grandoli and Newell's Old Boys; Rjikaard and Zambrotta from Barcelona; Jorge Valdano and many others from Argentina, Manchester City's Pablo Zabaleta and ex-Chelsea defender Asier del Horno. In the final chapter Messi himself sizes up his life so far. Messi is a brilliant, insightful and revealing portrait of football's most exciting player and a must-read for all true

Josh Sacree's insight:

This is Messi' biography and it is all about his life and how he got into soccer and what he did to get there and how is he feeling now. I read Messi' biography and i found the book very interesting.One of the most interesting and inspiring parts was  when Messi was small, he use to play on sand with his friends with a ball they use to make out of newspaper. He said i that he didnt mind what they used but he just wanted to play soccer and no one could stop his dream. I found this so inspiring because from playing with a newspaper ball to being the best player in the world is amazing. I think this book also shows that Messi came from very little but with his determination and the dream he stuck in his mind, he became a professional soccer player. He is a role model for me because being a soccer player is my dream and i think i can do it.

 

                                                       Works CitedCaioli, Luca. Messi - The Inside Story of the Boy Who Became a  Legend.Australia: Icon, 2010. Print.
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Amputee soccer player- Anyone can become a professional

Amputee soccer player- Anyone can become a professional | Soccer is the sport | Scoop.it

Nico Calabria wows people with his skills despite having one leg and playing with crutches

"My disability doesn't define who I am," said Nico. "My disability gives me a challenge everyday that I need to overcome and I think that challenge has made me a stronger person."

 

Born without a right leg and hip, Nico was raised by parents who wanted their son to grow up normally, not expecting special treatment.

 

"You can look at what's missing, or what you have," said Nico's father, Carl Calabria. "So when I describe my son, I will never say he's missing one leg, my son has one leg. And that's the way we look at it."

 Nico was just five when he decided that his traditional prosthetic leg was simply holding him back.

 For Nico, forearm crutches made him stick out, but they also allowed him more mobility.I can play soccer on my crutches," said Nico. "I can run. I can climb Kilimanjaro." But it was two weeks ago, when he scored his first varsity soccer goal, that Nico became famous. The clip of his goal was loaded onto Youtube where it has gotten more than a million hits.

 "I don't think it was my teammates thinking Nico has one leg and he just scored a goal on varsity," said Nico. "It was more like, that was a nice goal. No pity. No differences. I just want to be seen as an equal, as someone that is a competitor."

Nico pads his crutches for safety. Citing the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association ruled that he could use them. He is quick to push back against anyone who suggests that playing with crutches gives him some kind of competitive advantage.

 "I suggest they try it and then tell me if they think it's an advantage or not," said Nico.

This past summer, he scored a goal for the U.S. Amputee Soccer Team in Mexico. Not one to dream small, Nico now has his eye on the Amputee World Cup.

 "I've got one leg. You get one life," said Nico. "I'm not going to let the hand I was dealt in life dictate what my life is going to be."

 

A picture is worth a 1,000 words, especially when it leaves you speechless.

Josh Sacree's insight:

This article was about a boy who only had one leg, but still played soccer and made it to the national level where he played for the Amputee USA team. I found this article very inspiring because it says that anyone can play and that anyone can be a professional if they put there minds to it and if they are willing to put hard work into everything they do. The thing i found most inspiring was when he said he has only one life and that he is not going to waste it just because he has one leg, this to me is showing that he is determined and i think that is very important to becoming a professional soccer player and i think im determined because im saying in my head if a boy who has one leg and can do so much, imagine what a person with two legs can do if he believes how this boy believed. I find this boy amazing just because he has done so much with his life in soccer and thats what i want to do because i love this sport.

 

                                                 Works CitedAxelrod, Jim. "Amputee Soccer Player Becomes Internet Hit." CBS Evening News. N.p., 1 Oct. 2012. Web. 13 Jan. 2013.

 

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Richard Nuttall- The soccer at Hofstra

Richard Nuttall- The soccer at Hofstra | Soccer is the sport | Scoop.it

 

Richard Nuttall, a former professional soccer player in England and a former member of the Long Island Rough Riders, is entering his 25th season as Hofstra University Head Soccer Coach in 2013. Nuttall has guided the Pride to a 218-198-51 record in his 24 seasons in transforming the program into one of the most competitive in the Northeast.

Nuttall, who is the winngest coach in program history, led his team to an appearance in the 2012 Colonial Athletic Association championship game in guiding Hofstra to an 11-6-1 finish. It marked the fourth double-digit win total in the last nine years for the Pride.

Under Nuttall’s tutelage, Shaun Foster earned Third Team All-America honors from the NSCAA, making him the third player in program history to be honored. Two of those players – Foster and Michael Todd— have played for Nuttall.

Nuttall picked up his 200th career win in dramatic fashion, as Hofstra defeated VCU 2-1 in the 2010 Colonial Athletic Association semifinals on a penalty kick with five seconds left in regulation. That victory enabled Hofstra to reach the CAA title game for the fourth time in the last seven years under Nuttall's guidance, as the Pride rallied with a young team late in the year to qualify for the CAA Tournament before finishing 8-7-5 overall and 5-3-3 in league play.Prior to his arrival in Hempstead, the soccer program had posted five losing seasons in nine years, including a 3-9-6 season in 1988. Nuttall's teams have finished .500 or better 12 times in the last 16 seasons, including a streak of seven straight at one point – a remarkable feat considering that Hofstra has been in three conferences (East Coast, America East, CAA) during that time, each more competitive than the last. In addition, Hofstra Soccer players have flourished under Nuttall’s guidance, as several are either playing professionally or are members of their respective National teams.  

Josh Sacree's insight:

I think Hofstra is a great college and if you want to carry on playing competitive soccer after school and try get far in soccer, you can go to Hofstra and still learn but play good soccer. The article is about the head coach of the Hofstra team and his accomplishments with the team. I think Hofstra has a great team and Nuttall makes the team better with his coaching. He has made players go play professionally and those players could be you and i would like to be one of those players. The league they are in is one of the toughest leagues in college level, so the soccer is good and very competitive. The article also speaks about how well Hofstra have been doing and that tells you that even though they are in a hard league, they win, so the team is really good and Nutall chooses good players. I would want to go to this college because i might get a chance at playing professional soccer and still get an education which is really good for after playing soccer.

 

                                              Works Cited"Richard Nuttall." Hofstra Pride. Hofstra University, n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2013.
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Soccer Player Career Information - Be a professional soccer player

Soccer Player Career Information - Be a professional soccer player | Soccer is the sport | Scoop.it

Soccer Player - A soccer player is one of the most popular professions in the sports world. The job involves playing soccer professionally, and is a common career choice.

A soccer player is one of the most popular professions in the sports world. The job involves playing soccer professionally, and is a common career choice in some particular areas of the world. A soccer player usually starts their career at a low-ranking team and continues to build up fame and experience until they’ve caught the attention of a team higher up in the rankings – continuing to climb up as much as possible. When they’re not playing against other teams, soccer players are usually spending their time training physically and perfecting their teamwork – a most important aspect of a team’s success in the sport.

Like with all other types of sports players, becoming a soccer player involves showing interest in the sport from an early age. Many successful sports players have been interested in the sport from their school years, taking part in their local teams and clubs. A great degree of physical fitness and the ability to think quickly on one’s toes are the requirements for a successful soccer player.

It’s not easy to specify an average salary for a soccer player – like most other sports players, their income varies with the skill and place of employment. Amateur soccer players who play in the lower-ranking teams usually stand to earn $25,000 – $35,000 a year, though in some cases this can go even lower – while those who manage to go up to the professional teams and build a solid reputation can easily see a salary of over $100,000 a year, provided they can maintain their peak level of performance.

Josh Sacree's insight:

I thought the article was really good and informative. It told you what you needed to have to become a soccer player and what you need to do to get to a professional level. The article was all about the soccer life and how you can get there and the salary you get. It had what the players did at training and the article also told you that you start off in a low ranking club and progressively move to higher ranking clubs which I agree with because you cant just start off good, you have to get good and make a reputation for yourself. I also agree with that teamwork and team chemistry is very important because you cant just have some good players that like each other, you have to have a whole squad of good players that like each other because that will make your team even better. So i think if you like sports and you like soccer you should try become a professional soccer player because you do what you love and still make money which is really good.

 

"Soccer Player Career Information - Salary, Education Requirements & Job Description." Soccer Player Career Information - Salary, Education Requirements & Job Description. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2013."Soccer Player." SuperScholar. Web.
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Wow to become a professional soccer player

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Dane Sacree Football 2012

Dane Sacree participating in a few football matches. Songs Played: "Trae-Rock N' Roll", sound recording administered by: Koch Entertainment "Avicii-Levels - ...
Josh Sacree's insight:

This video is about Dane Sacree and his games he played for a few teams. In this video it showed Danes skills, passing, dribbling and what he did on the field. I like this video because i know Dane and he is playing for the Hofstra university team which is really good because he has carried his soccer on and he might become a professional soccer player. Dane always use to say that he was to old but even though he said this, he was determined and thats what got him in the Hofstra team and i think if he keeps that mentality he can make a professional team.  The video also showed that Dane was playing older people and i thought this was good because this makes your skills better and you become a better player in total because you are playing people that are stronger, faster and more skillful. I think Dane is a role model to whoever wants to become a professional player because if he can do it then so can i and so many other people if they are prepared to.

 

                                                   Works Cited

Sacree, Dane. "Dane Sacree Football 2012." Youtube. N.p., 18 June 2012. Web. 13 Jan. 2013.

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How to Become a Professional Soccer Player

How to Become a Professional Soccer Player | Soccer is the sport | Scoop.it

Football (or soccer as it is known Canada, Samoa, the United States and Southern Africa Etymology, Association Football,  is a popular sport that is enjoyed across many cultures...

Have a Passion for the Game

 

 

Start Early & Stay Committed1     Commit to playing football through graduated levels.Commit to playing football through graduated levels. Choose a school team, local club, or district team that you can attend regularly and that has a good coach. Each country, state, or region will have its own club or team expectations and progression levels, so it is not possible to be precise about the process itself in this article. However, what you should be aiming to do is:Start playing as young as possible. Shift to playing in organized youth teams some time between the ages of 5 and 14. Get your parents or other adults and even friends to play soccer with you as much as possible. Continue with youth teams every year, progressing to more competitive and selective teams every change up, playing with older youth than your age group if possible (playing "up a level" or "up an age group"). Train regularly and get involved in organized games as early as possible. Try to get into matches and tournaments that represent your school, region, state or country at youth level. Attend training camps as early as possible. If your club or association of clubs offers training camps, summer camps, etc., make use of these. You'll feed off the enthusiasm and lots of competitiveness of other players and you'll learn a lot in an intense, short period of time. Look for professional developmental programs and see how you can become a part of these. Ask your coach or club mentors for advice on what's available through your club, or generally. Eventually, move from youth teams to scholastic and collegiate teams, and then to amateur and semi-professional level teams and clubs. It isn't until you've played against seniors that you know you're ready for the professional circuit, so keep climbing the levels gradually.If you're in the USA, aim to get into a college that has a top soccer program in place.  

Excel in Every Way1Be prepared for hard work and be patient. Being the best comes at the price of dedicated hard work but if your single focus is to be a professional soccer player, this hard work is essential. Aiming for the professional level also requires patience - being able to accept that turning professional is a gradual process during which you continue to learn, to build your technical skills, soccer knowledge, and importantly, making good contacts with other people .As a player wanting to become the best, you will need to dedicate time to practising almost every single day (at least 5-6 days a week). Whatever the weather, you'll need to keep practising, all the while probably balancing studies or even part-time work. It is the practice, the daily dedication, that will develop your talent, and hone your skills the best. As was said before, train individually. Even when you're not at the club, practice your skills individually, or with friends and family members, preferably getting good experience with older players as many times as possible. Aim to improve your technical ability at all times. Work with the ball until everything you do with it seems like second nature.Work on your weaker skills too, in order to strengthen your overall skills-set and adaptability. As a parent of a child seeking to become a professional player, your own level of dedication must be enormous - from transporting your child to games (including interstate and overseas), buying football gear, membership fees, etc., talking with coaches, helping with informal practice sessions, boosting your child's morale, etc.  2     Be exceptional.Be exceptional. After you've had a chance to play for a while, it's time to start seriously looking at your skills. Find out what position your innate skills are best suited to. When working this out, don't just think about yourself but also think about how your skills feed into your teamwork, and how your strengths fit into the game as a whole. Ultimately, it is important that you are really good at what you do because there is a lot of competition and there isn't any room for second best.Seek your coach's honest opinion about your strengths and your chances, and learn from your coach's suggestions about possible ways to improve or hone your natural talent. Be a top performer in the level that you're playing at now. If you're not, make an honest assessment as to whether you can improve this, or if you need to shift to a different position, or perhaps even remain at amateur level. Prove that you're good in games. This means consistent proof - show that you can deliver every week, not just once in a while. If you're the outstanding player of the week every week, you're on the right track. 

 

Be in great shape. Your fitness levels matter in football. Work on your fitness by exercising regularly, eating healthily, and avoiding substances that can impair your performance, such as alcohol. Get enough sleep every night. It is also important to learn how to try and stay injury-free - this includes learning how to play well from the start (i.e., knowing how to kick properly, etc.), and how to keep in good physical shape generally through stretching, exercising, etc., so that you don't suffer from avoidable injuries. Be strong mentally. While football itself is a beautiful game, the life of a professional football player is one of uncertainty and instability. It is a world of short-term contracts, with plenty of other hopefuls waiting in the wings to replace anyone who fails to maintain consistent performance; there are also the risks of injury and the fact of ageing. These realities can all give rise to feelings of insecurity and burn out. Developing the ability to cope with uncertainty, constant competitive pressures, and insecurity is vital for your own success. Also, public exposure can be very trying if you do make it to the top - celebrity status and constant press scrutiny can be wearying and can even lead to depression and other mental health challenges if you're not well prepared. It might be helpful to see a sports health professional or sports psychologist to work on developing coping strategies if you don't already have these skills soundly in place. And learn early that it's okay to talk things out with someone you trust rather than keeping worries bottled up inside.
Josh Sacree's insight:

This article is about how to become a professional or how you can train from an early age and get better and better until you can become a professional soccer player. This article also shows you what you need to become a professional and i agree with them all because ive been playing soccer for quite a while and i still havent got all these skills but i hope as i get better i will. I think i agree mostly with having a strong mentality because even though you have to have some skills in soccer, a huge part of it is mental and if you dont have the mentality, it will be hard to play and even harder to become a professional. You need to say i can do it and i will do it and this is part of mentality and thats why you need it. The article also said be exceptional, but i only know what is exceptional is for me, but not for others, so my exceptional could be skills and mentality but another persons could be passing and speed, so i dont really get that one but i think its just telling you to be your best and with your best and belief, you can do anything.

 

                                               Works cited

Roh, Einsik. "How to Become a Professional Soccer Player." WikiHow. Ed. Luca, Nicole Willson, and Alex Loginov. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Jan. 2013

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Pelé interview with Inside Soccer- About his life and how the game has changed

Arguably the greatest football player of all time, Pelé discusses the current and future trends in the game of soccer, as well as what legacy he thinks he ha...
Josh Sacree's insight:

I think Pele is one of the greatest soccer players in the world and to hear his experiences as a professional soccer player is really interesting. The video was about Pele's experiences in soccer and how he thinks the game has changed from his time playing to now. The video is also about what makes a good player and i think if you listen, they are not all easy things to do, so to become a professional player isn’t easy but if you love it, you will do it. I also agreed with Pele in the video that players need discipline and I think this is important because if there is no discipline then the team doesn’t listen and everything goes out of control. Also by Pele speaking it makes me want to do all these things he tells me and him talking about his experiences, makes me imagine that i was him and i lived with all the accomplishments that he got. I also think when i watch this video, it makes me want to become a professional soccer player because i want to do what i love like Pele and i want to be a part of a team and win and get accomplishments.

 

                                                 Works CitedPele. "Pele Interview with inside Soccer." Interview. Youtube. LLana InsdeSoccer, 1 Apr. 2012. Web. 13 Jan. 2013

 

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