Snyder v. Phelps (Westboro Baptist Church)
11 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Hannah Rickelmann
Scoop.it!

A Peek Inside The Westboro Baptist Church : NPR

A Peek Inside The Westboro Baptist Church : NPR | Snyder v. Phelps (Westboro Baptist Church) | Scoop.it
The Topeka, Kan., church claims only about 100 members — almost all from the family of a man named Fred Phelps. "They're college educated. They're well-spoken.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Rickelmann
Scoop.it!

Breaking News, Analysis, Politics, Blogs, News Photos, Video, Tech Reviews - TIME.com

Hannah Rickelmann's insight:

A very helpful link from time.com. It covers Snyders opinions by quoting them, and it directly quotes the majority report. It goes into detail about specifics such as Snyders emotional distraught that stemmed from the case and focuses more on his side.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Rickelmann
Scoop.it!

Snyder v. Phelps - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Snyder v. Phelps, 562 U.S. ___ (2011), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that speech on a public sidewalk, about a public issue, cannot be liable for a tort of emotional distress, even if the speech is found to be "outrageous".

At issue was whether the First Amendment protected protests of public protestors at a funeral against tort liability. It involved a claim of intentional infliction of emotional distress made by Albert Snyder, the father of Matthew Snyder, a Marine who died in the Iraq War. The claim was made against the Phelps family, including Fred Phelps, and against Phelps' Westboro Baptist Church (WBC). The Court ruled in favor of Phelps in an 8–1 decision, holding that their speech related to a public issue, and was disseminated on a public sidewalk.

On March 10, 2006, Westboro Baptist Church picketed the funeral of U.S. Marine Lance Corporal Matthew A. Snyder, who was killed in a non-combat-related vehicle accident in Iraq on March 3, 2006.[1][2] On March 8, WBC announced its intention of picketing the funeral in Westminister, Maryland, as it had done at thousands of other funerals throughout the country in protest of what they considered America's increasing tolerance of homosexuality. Picketers displayed placards such as "America is doomed", "You're going to hell", "God hates you", "Fag troops", "Semper fi fags" and "Thank God for dead soldiers".[3] Members of the Patriot Guard were present in support of the Snyder family.[4] WBC published statements on its website that denounced Albert Snyder and his ex-wife for raising their son Catholic, stating they "taught Matthew to defy his creator", "raised him for the devil" and "taught him that God was a liar".[5]

Hannah Rickelmann's insight:

This goes over the simple basic details of the case. The first sentance boils it down nicely and tells you what it's about and the outcome, "The Snyder vs. Phelps was a Supreme Court case in which the Court held that speech on a public sidewalk, about a public issue, cannot be liable for a tort of emotional distress, even if the speech is found to be "outrageous" "

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Rickelmann
Scoop.it!

Snyder v. Phelps | The Oyez Project at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law

Hannah Rickelmann's insight:

This website has the briefs for the case. It will be interesting to reference as I write my own to make sure I'm being accurate.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Hannah Rickelmann
Scoop.it!

Famous Trials and Supreme Court Decisions

Famous Trials and Supreme Court Decisions
Hannah Rickelmann's insight:

This was the website I originally found the case from. I thought it was interesting because I've been hearing a lot about WBC over the course of the past 2 years and it would be interesting to know more in depth about something they were involved with. This gives a quick and concise overview of the case.

more...
No comment yet.