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Up in smoke: 'Low income smokers in New York spend 25% of their income on cigarettes'

Up in smoke: 'Low income smokers in New York spend 25% of their income on cigarettes' | smoking | Scoop.it

Via New York Post:

 

ALBANY — A new study shows low-income smokers in New York spend 25 percent of their income on cigarettes.

 

The study by RTI's Public Health Policy Research Program, using state data, finds wealthy smokers spend just 2 percent of their income on cigarettes.

 

The American Cancer Society says the state's taxes which are the highest in the nation are a cause. The society says the study shows New York needs to spend more on smoking cessation programs aimed at the poor.


The New York state Health Department says high cigarette taxes are proven to reduce smoking. In addition, the state is promoting several anti-smoking programs including those aimed at lower-income people and young people to persuade them not to smoke.


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CHART OF THE DAY: E-Cigarettes Are A Small, But Rapidly Growing Problem For Big Tobacco

CHART OF THE DAY: E-Cigarettes Are A Small, But Rapidly Growing Problem For Big Tobacco | smoking | Scoop.it

The tobacco industry has a big problem: people are smoking less.

Morgan Stanley's David Adelman sees at least eight reasons why this is happening. From his latest note to clients:

 

"Secular pressure on US cigarette consumption continues unabated, and includes: (i) An aging and more health conscious population; (ii) A substantial decade long decline in youth smoking incidence; (iii) A lower incidence of smoking across all age levels for each successive age cohort; (iv) A shift amongst Caucasian males towards use of moist smokeless tobacco (drives menthol growth); (v) A shift in the US ethic composition towards groups with far lower cigarette consumption (e.g., Asia and Hispanic-Americans); (vi) More prevalent indoor smoking bans; (vii) A considerable shift towards far lower federally taxed pipe tobacco; and (viii) Shifts in societal pressure and changes in social norms/attitudes."

 


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