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Programs not pills
Changing habits can save you from having to take pills, and it is a cheaper safer way to stay in share. The smartfork helps you eating slowly, it is a 1st step.
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Wearables will soon analyze your body chemistry to make you healthier

Wearables will soon analyze your body chemistry to make you healthier | Programs not pills | Scoop.it

A lot of the focus in wearable computing has been on delivering products that help everyday users monitor some of the more basic activity traits, such as steps taken and heart rate. While these are certainly useful metrics for health monitoring, they do not paint the full picture.

 

Computational biologists instead study the chemical changes that occur in people’s bodies with the help of optical sensors, non-invasive devices that use the red-to-near-infrared spectral region to assess the chemical changes that occur in the user’s blood vessels, among other places.

 

By leveraging this cutting-edge technology and wearable computing, we are equipped to understand the changes that occur in a person’s body at a whole new level. The implications of this change span from improved training of athletes to better management of chronic diseases and healthcare.

 

 Some interesting recent cases in research that show the potential for disruption include:

 

Researchers at the National Technical University of Athens have helped individuals self-manage diabetes by stimulating the function of an artificial pancreas with fully embedded wearable systems. A paper in the Journal of Biomechanics shows promising results for wearables in athletic training. Scientists mapped out the physiology of athletes’ ski-jumps in order to determine the biological constraints of each individual’s approach. By comparing data across 22 different skiiers, the scientists were able to determine that the wearable system was a very promising tool for training that captured information beyond the capacity of a traditional camera.Researchers at Texas A&M University are investigating the use of optical sensors to interact with dermally-implanted microparticle sensors. This technology could enable cost cutting and continuous blood chemistry monitoring.Optical sensors used to monitor both athletic performance and overall health by researchers at the Dublin Institute of Technology. The sophisticated sensors interpret user’s sweat particles in order to deduce what is going on at a biological level. One of the sensors measured pH levels of sweat particles in order to deduce dehydration while athletes were running. This is a huge stride for activity tracking because it represents real time monitoring of athletic performance and biological signals
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Sue Gould's curator insight, October 11, 2013 1:43 AM

Wearable computers are here.  

Dan Baxter's curator insight, October 12, 2013 11:20 AM

The next step for quantified and teleheath sensors

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Digital tools and online health services poised to play key role in consumer health management, study finds - Manhattan Research

Health engagement online deepening at a time when consumers are expected to take a greater role in their care (Digital tools & online health services poised to play key role in consumer health managementz; http://t.co/5ThQmA5nDG...

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The future of wearable sensors in healthcare

The future of wearable sensors in healthcare | Programs not pills | Scoop.it

Three panel sessions at the Body Computing Conference were focused on Wearable Sensors, and brought together the thought leaders in the exploding mHealth segment.


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Your brain lags your stomach by about 20... - Time Is on Your Side | Facebook

Your brain lags your stomach by about 20 minutes when it comes to satiety (fullness) signals. If you eat slowly enough, your brain will catch up to tell... (Your brain lags your stomach by about 20 minutes when it comes to satiety (fullness) signals.
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Beck Diet Solution Day Five: Eat Slowly & Mindfully - SparkPeople

Beck Diet Solution Day Five:  Eat Slowly  & Mindfully - SparkPeople | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
from Free Diet Plans at SparkPeople, on Aug 31Hey, I thought, I did this as part of 'Eat Sitting Down' on Day Two. But not quite; today there...Edit in Conversation
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How to Eat Slowly to Avoid Overeating

How to Eat Slowly to Avoid Overeating | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
The concept of eating slowly as a means to avoid overeating is based on the simple fact that your brain needs about 20 minutes to get the "signal" that you are not hungry anymore and that you can stop eating.http://www.webmd.com/food-rec... (How to...
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Eat with ease for weight loss - Times of India

Eat with ease for weight loss - Times of India | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
Times of India
Eat with ease for weight loss
Times of India
When we eat slowly, we feel satisfied and tend to eat less because our senses are more alert n send the signals to the brain saying the stomach is full.
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Phuket health: You are what you eat - The Phuket News

Phuket health: You are what you eat - The Phuket News | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
Phuket health: You are what you eat
The Phuket News
Eat slowly: Eating quickly makes overeating more likely as it takes 15-20 minutes for your body to register that you full. Think smaller portions. Eat the healthy foods that you enjoy.
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Why eating slowly may help you feel full faster

Why eating slowly may help you feel full faster | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
Many diet books advise people to chew slowly so they will feel full after eating less food than if they ate quickly.
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Helpful Hints To Alleviating The Symptoms Of Acid Reflux | Heartburn Home Remedies

Helpful Hints To Alleviating The Symptoms Of Acid Reflux | Heartburn Home Remedies | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
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Stress and Anxiety Among the Leading Causes of Obesity, Studies Find

Stress and Anxiety Among the Leading Causes of Obesity, Studies Find | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
Being well fed was once a sign of wealth, but obesity is now most prevalent among poor people. Surveys by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show a close connection between obesity rates and socioeconomic status in American adults.
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French Foodie Baby: Anatomy of the French four-course meal

French Foodie Baby: Anatomy of the French four-course meal | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
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Matthew Ames – One Small Step on a Scale

Matthew Ames – One Small Step on a Scale | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
In this video from the Boston Quantified Self Show&Tell, Matthew Ames describes the self-tracking project that dramatically changed his weight and fitness.
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Wearables will soon analyze your body chemistry to make you healthier

Wearables will soon analyze your body chemistry to make you healthier | Programs not pills | Scoop.it

A lot of the focus in wearable computing has been on delivering products that help everyday users monitor some of the more basic activity traits, such as steps taken and heart rate. While these are certainly useful metrics for health monitoring, they do not paint the full picture. Computational biologists instead study the chemical changes that occur in people’s bodies with the help of optical sensors, non-invasive devices that use the red-to-near-infrared spectral region to assess the chemical changes that occur in the user’s blood vessels, among other places.

By leveraging this cutting-edge technology and wearable computing, we are equipped to understand the changes that occur in a person’s body at a whole new level. The implications of this change span from improved training of athletes to better management of chronic diseases and healthcare.

 

 


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New data on the toll technology takes on our health

New data on the toll technology takes on our health | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
LUMO BodyTech, the makers of the LUMOback smart posture and movement feedback system, has announced national survey results revealing a widespread phenomenon LUMO calls 'Silicon Valley Syndrome'. T

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The Advantages of eating slowly - MedicMagic.Net

The Advantages of  eating slowly  - MedicMagic.Net | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
from MedicMagic.Net | health tips, news, and informations, on Aug 13Not many people know chewing duration is actually quite important for their health because it could provide many benefits for them if they chew on their foods...Edit in Conversation...
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Why Eating Slowly Is Good For Health? - iBeeHealthy

from iBeeHealthy — Health & Wellness Guide, on Sep 18Why Eating Slowly Is Good For Health?
Generally, people ignore to focus on minute things that are important for maintaining a good health.
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Reasons why we should eat slowly - by Rachel Alessi - Helium

Reasons why we should eat slowly - by Rachel Alessi - Helium | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
When you tuck into your lunch do you realise that food digestion actually begins in the mouth, not the stomach?
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Expert Tips for Healthy Dining Out - U.S. News & World Report (blog)

Expert Tips for Healthy Dining Out - U.S. News & World Report (blog) | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
Expert Tips for Healthy Dining Out
U.S. News & World Report (blog)
Eat slowly to give your stomach time to send the 'full' message to your brain (it takes about 15 to 20 minutes).
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THE HEALTHY 10 - Daily Star Online

THE HEALTHY 10 - Daily Star Online | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
Daily Star Online
THE HEALTHY 10
Daily Star Online
So, for all those weight conscious people, the next time you eat your food in a hurry, just remember, the longer you chew your food, the more time it will take you to finish the meal.
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World Heart Day: Eat good, workout for a strong heart - NDTV

World Heart Day: Eat good, workout for a strong heart - NDTV | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
NDTV
World Heart Day: Eat good, workout for a strong heart
NDTV
Eat slowly and take smaller portion, opt for low calories, but rich in nutrients food. - Keep away from food rich in fat: Use skimmed or low fat milk and milk products.
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“But I Don’t Know How to Eat Slowly. . .” | Eating For Performance Blog

“But I Don’t Know How to Eat Slowly. . .” | Eating For Performance Blog | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
Recently I was talking with a client about eating slowly. I took him through some ways to slow down eating. He said, people would tell me to slow down, but no
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Lifestyle Intervention Beats Dieting for Weight Loss

Lifestyle Intervention Beats Dieting for Weight Loss | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
As a nutritionist, I recommend lifestyle changes over dieting to all my clients.
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Right-Size Your Plate and Your Waistline - Timi Gustafson, R.D. | How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun

Right-Size Your Plate and Your Waistline - Timi Gustafson, R.D. | How to Eat Right and Still Have Fun | Programs not pills | Scoop.it
By Lisa Young, PhD, RD, CDN Practicing portion control is one of the most difficult tasks facing anyone who eats out or just eats these days. Look around – everything is supersized. And not just fast food.
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