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7 Ways Our Cities Will Change According to TED's Urban Experts

7 Ways Our Cities Will Change According to TED's Urban Experts | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
Silent parks. Designing for disabilities. Human-powered data. Garbage anthropology. World-class sidewalks. Floating favelas. Paint as infrastructure.

These are the keys to the cities of the future, according to the most recent TED conference, City 2.0. Last year, for the first time, the TED Prize went to an idea—the future of the city—and a million dollars was divvied up among ten grantees all over the world.

 

Last week was the first-ever TED City 2.0 conference, featuring several of those grantees plus many other urban leaders discussing their ideas for the future of the city.


Via Lauren Moss
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Simple ideas wrapped in big dreams. GET INSPIRED! 

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New Book: The City as Interface. How New Media Are Changing the City by Martijn de Waal

New Book: The City as Interface. How New Media Are Changing the City by Martijn de Waal | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it

Digital and mobile media are changing the way urban life takes shape and how we experience our built environment. On the face of it, this is mainly a practical matter: thanks to these technologies we can organize our lives more conveniently. But the rise of ‘urban media’ also presents us with an important philosophical issue: How do they influence the way that the city functions as a community?

Employing examples of new media uses as well as historical case studies, Martijn de Waal shows how new technologies, on one level, contribute to the further individualization and liberalization of urban society. There is an alternative future scenario, however, in which digital media construct a new definition of the urban public sphere. In the process they also breathe new life into the classical republican ideal of the city as an open, democratic ‘community of strangers’.


Via Rob Kitchin
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

The City As Interface by Martijn de Waal--A Must Read for Any Smart Cities follower

 

In Helsinki, in 2010 - 2011,  I met up with the inspired people of Forum Virium, led by Jarmo Eskalinen, the innovation agency of the city, while I still spread the word of Cisco's Smart + Connected Communities. We talked about the city as a platform, connecting all nfrastructures, objects & devices, and data in the city. One of the young professionals called it 'The City As The Interface'. 

 

In 2012, I took this with me to Almere; with the city, internationale companies, local entrepreneurs, students and citizens we actually building an urban platform, as in 'The City As Interface', to be showcased as a proof of concept in Spring 2014, and scaled citywide in 2015. 

 

Am sure to learn from this book by Martijn de Waal.

 

Ray

 

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Rob Kitchin's curator insight, February 11, 5:02 AM

Book finally turned up today, months after being ordered!  It is now published.

Manu Fernandez's curator insight, February 11, 6:39 AM

Long wait, but it is finally here!

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"Against the smart city" now available for purchase in Kindle

"Against the smart city" now available for purchase in Kindle | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
This is turning into a week of posts that begin "It gives me great pleasure...", isn't it? Well, forgive me: it does actually give me great pleasure to share with you the news that our pamphlet "Ag...
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Read it over Christmas and let it sink in for a few weeks: I find it an outstanding analysis of the current smart cities wave mostly ignited by a few iconic new urban developments, big cities and its leaders, major developers and prominent technology partners.

 

Adam's pamphlet brings things back to perspective and common sense. And the insight that what is good for cities (operations) is not necessarily the same for its citizens. Adam gives a balanced, deep and eloquent analysis why this trend of smart cities mania is not sustainable. For you. For us.

 

You know, I love small simple things that make a big difference. I believe that those small simple things of change happen at the magical connection of residents and entrepreneurs, backed-up by students, researchers and .... yes, civil servants. The sparkle of innovation starts there, in the neighborhoods of our own city, ready to be unleashed however not always recognized as such. This is the 'spontaneous order from below' that brings order to chaos of new urban life.

 

Ray

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Bass and Flinders Gateway: A Proposed Development Encouraging Community in New South Wales

Bass and Flinders Gateway: A Proposed Development Encouraging Community in New South Wales | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it

The Bass and Flinders Gateway development in New South Wales, Australia sits at the threshold of Wollongong and the greater Illawarra region, with the Illawarra Escarpment as the backdrop and inspiration behind the design concept- an aesthetic and metaphoric link to the building’s central location at the heart of the coastal plain between the mountain and sea, resonating the energy and history of the city.


To manage the transition between the city center and its outskirts, the profile of the buildings vary, layered as the topography of the escarpment, fine-tuned to moderate between the scales of the city, the domestic to the civic, the shed to the office tower. 
At the heart of the development is a central green space, permeable to cyclists and pedestrians, importantly connected into the Wollongong city grain and its local precinct. Designed to encourage social interaction and foster a sense of community that works positively with the developing urban plan and commercial strategy of the city rather than in competition it. 


Via Lauren Moss
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Love The Design And Intention --- out there in South Wales, Australia

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Norm Miller's curator insight, January 1, 4:32 PM

City planning matters and yet it is so often weighed down by naive resident concerns, NIMBY types and policitians.  

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The Most Walkable Cities and How Some Are Making Strides

The Most Walkable Cities and How Some Are Making Strides | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it

t,Densely populated neighborhoods, commercial district city squares and multiple public transit lines all span the city of Cambridge, Mass., creating an environment ideal for walking.

The most recent Census counts estimate nearly a quarter of the city’s residents walk to work, far more than any other larger U.S. city.

Many localities across the country are continuing to push policies and planning initiatives aimed at making communities more walkable. Recent census figures depict a wide variation in commuting habits among the nation’s urban centers, showing some have done much more than others.

Nationally, only a small fraction of people primarily walk to work – the measure the Census Bureau estimates in its annual American Communities Survey. In a select group of cities, though, recent data illustrates the extent to which walking has emerged as an everyday means of commuting.


Via Lauren Moss
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Walking is fun. And smart.

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Norm Miller's curator insight, December 20, 2013 12:41 PM

It helps if you live in Southern California but then if you live in LA you never walk anywhere.

ParadigmGallery's comment, December 21, 2013 9:27 PM
XO Cambridge, I walked to work for three years...interesting article
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Ahead of the Technology Game: Above and Below Ground

Ahead of the Technology Game: Above and Below Ground | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
as published in: Canadian Mining Magazine (Print) By Rick Huijbregts Fall 2013, Page 31 There’s no disputing that advancements in technology can help transform an industry. We’ve already seen it in...
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

An intensive, high-risk, natural resources extraction industry as mining is far-ahead of what smart cities intend to do: Gelsomini, IT Director of Dundee Precious Metals, is referring to a system that uses WiFi and radio frequency identification (RFID) tracking in order to locate assets, increase resource availability and keep miners out of harm’s way. The system includes embedded sensors, cameras and controllers and can keep track of vehicles, equipment and miners themselves. Its smart network contains WiFi-enabled seismic sensors and industrial camera monitors to increase productivity, operational longevity and even safety precautions.

 

What is smart about this? The platform Dundee created is connecting objects and people through a variety of sensing  devices, and generates and collects massive data to correlate and analize real-time for immediate action AND anticipate pre-emptive scenario's to keep the miners out of harm's way.

 

Not too diffucult to map to a high-density, high-risk environment as our communities and cities. 

 

A great, lucid and precise blog by Rick Huijbregts, by the way. Cool! Despite his biased industry perspective - he is a Cisco employee, Rick is one of those rare, 'independant' and visionary thought leaders on smart cities.    

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7 Ways Our Cities Will Change According to TED's Urban Experts

7 Ways Our Cities Will Change According to TED's Urban Experts | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
Silent parks. Designing for disabilities. Human-powered data. Garbage anthropology. World-class sidewalks. Floating favelas. Paint as infrastructure.

These are the keys to the cities of the future, according to the most recent TED conference, City 2.0. Last year, for the first time, the TED Prize went to an idea—the future of the city—and a million dollars was divvied up among ten grantees all over the world.

 

Last week was the first-ever TED City 2.0 conference, featuring several of those grantees plus many other urban leaders discussing their ideas for the future of the city.


Via Lauren Moss
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Simple ideas wrapped in big dreams. GET INSPIRED! 

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The Living City - Buro Happold

The Living City - Buro Happold | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Urban environment, design and development mixed with technology and a deep visionairy understanding of smart cities

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Smart Cities: San Francisco Schools Improving, But Impervious to Creative City Assets - Getting Smart by Tom Vander Ark

Smart Cities: San Francisco Schools Improving, But Impervious to Creative City Assets - Getting Smart by Tom Vander Ark | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) appears to be in a time warp. Yesterday, I outlined the leadership role that the Bay Area, especially the city of San Francisco, plays in learning innovation.
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

The following quotes below from the conclusion by Tom Vander Ark's article 'Smart Cities: San Francisco Schools Improving, But Impervious to Creative City Assets', I find boggling.

 

"Proximity has little bearing on whether an innovation will be adopted by schools."

 

"San Francisco is clearly one of the most creative cities in the world. With Oakland and Silicon Valley, it is the global hub of innovation — including edtech. Why is it then that school districts in the area are so traditional, seemingly impervious to the buzz, talent, and tools around them?"

"Conclusion. San Francisco is clearly one of the most creative cities in the world. With Oakland and Silicon Valley, it is the global hub of innovation — including edtech. Why is it then that school districts in the area are so traditional, seemingly impervious to the buzz, talent, and tools around them?

 

You would think these progressive cities would have innovative schools. But other than a few charter networks innovating out of budget desperation, Bay Area schools appear slow to incorporate digital learning.

 

They certainly don’t get any help from the state. Ridiculously low funding (compared to high costs of labor and real estate), incoherent policies, and barriers to innovation are no help. It’s quite remarkable that the Bay Area remains a vibrant as it is in such a disastrous anti-innovation policy environment.

 

It’s clear after reviewing innovations in a half a dozen cities that proximity has little bearing on whether an innovation will be adopted by schools. Leadership and governance appear to have more to do with the extent to which schools incorporate innovative tools and methods.

 

San Francisco schools are slowly improving. To achieve step-function improvement, they’ll need to look around and create new options that incorporate the new tools developed nearby."

 

Read the article in full. It is ... boggling, at least to me.

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Smart Cities Will Be Built From Ground-Up, Not Top-Down | Business Computing World

Smart Cities Will Be Built From Ground-Up, Not Top-Down | Business Computing World | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
Smart Cities Will Be Built From Ground-Up, Not Top-Down
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

"it is the citizens that will make the city by finding ways to craft, interlink and make sense of their own data"

 

This is only possible if the city takes a balanced approach. That means not only connecting and mobilizing citizens to do their thing, whatever that may be, but also set out a long term strategy on building the right infrastructure.

 

It is balancing 'mass control from above' AND 'the spontaneous oder from below'.

 

Still, I am with Usman Hague here. There indeed is no silver bullet nor a one stop shop solution for making cities smarter. It is about core values. Why do we want to make our city smarter? It is also about new governance and financial models. How do we want to make our city smarter? And ICT will facilitate why and how we want to do it. However, only and only if we set up a sustained, balanced and flexible strategy, with clear parameters and metrics, we might be able to use the full potential of ICT to live better, easier and with more fun in our urban habitat.  

 

Ray

Smart Cities Strategies

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Smart Cities Canada Summit - Toronto, Ontario

Smart Cities Canada Summit - Toronto, Ontario | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
Smart Cities help stakeholders utilize technological innovations to facilitate more efficient, accessible and cost-effective means of public service delivery ranging from public transit to security.
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Almere   in the Spotlight of Smarter Cities & Societies

 

Mayor Annemarie Jorritsma is invited by the Strategy Institute Toronto to talk as keynote speaker at the annual conference of Smart Cities Canada January 23 to 24, 2013 held in Toronto, Canada.

The conference provides a broad picture of smart city / smart society initiatives. This includes the impact of the urban platform and applications that in the long term ensure an efficient city operations, innovation and economic growth, strong social cohesion and sustainable urban development at potentially substantial cost reduction.

Acting as a keynote speaker and attending the conference will lead to excellent exposure and impact in the international community of smart cities / smart societies. Almere will position its leading technology innovations and innovative Smart Society approach like for instance Almere’s commitment to high speed communication network as key driver to enable the knowledge economy and its strategic sustainability agenda towards ‘Growing Green Cities’. Just two examples of many that make Almere an extraordinary place to work and live.

The presentation of the mayor will focus on building a strong, healthy and safe society, on improving services and applications by enhancing the high-tech urban infrastructure and increasing the accessibility of all public services including emergency services, waste management and traffic. But also about deploying smart strategies for future generations by and for the people and businesses in Almere.

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Almere Smart City: On The Road Towards Almere Smart Society (English)

What is Almere Smart City? Almere Smart City, or better yet, Almere Smart Society, is a vision of living and working in Almere by using the full potential of ICT.

 

To make urban life better, easier, cheaper and with more fun.

 

It connects people, business and city, fosters new ways of working together, incites collaboration & innovation. And it simplifies the co-creation of new services by citizens, businesses and government.

 

It uses ICT in a strategic and systemic manner across the sectors (transversal) enabled by an urban innovation platform. This urban platform interconnects all infrastructures, devices and data. It makes data relevant and accessible for all.

 

Almere Smart Society is a green, safe and vital urban community with healthy and sustainable systems. It drives healthy economic growth, strong social cohesion, sustainable organic urban development and efficient urban management.

 

For & By the people of Almere. A unique, innovative place to work and live.

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Smart Citizens - FutureEverything

Smart Citizens - FutureEverything | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
Download Here. This publication aims to shift the debate on the future of cities towards the central place of citizens, and of decentralised, open urban infrastructures.
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

This publication spurs the 'Spontaneous order from below'; the chaotic, unpredictable and beautiful bottom-up innovations by citizens and local entrepreneurs; and end-user driven innovation at home, on the street and in the neighborhood. This is the story of the smart cititzen. This is a manifesto for the smart citizen. 

 

“The ‘Smart City’ vision is shaped by providers of big technology, who are not attuned to bottom-up innovation, or the messy, disruptive ways that people use technology. It is a vision shaped around the need of the suppliers, and by the mindset of top-down masterplanning. More damningly still, the big technology companies are selling ‘smart city in a box’ solutions to cities, walled gardens that prevent scalable local business innovation. It is not surprising therefore that the technology is not selling, as the ‘smarter’ cities turn away.

The idea of the Smart Citizen has been proposed by thinkers such as Dan Hill […] to shift the debate towards the most important dimension of cities, the people who live, work and create within them.

On the one hand there is the view that Smart City design should allow for the disruptive ways in which people use technology. But there is also a stronger claim here, namely that citizens can, and should, play a leading role in conceiving, designing, building, maintaining our cities of the future.

This is a call for a fundamental shift in the way we think about our cities and about urban development, that goes beyond a plea for wider public consultation in the planning process. Alongside ‘top-down’ master-planning, we need to enable ‘bottom-up’ innovation and collaborative ways of developing systems out of many, loosely joined parts.”

 

I believe that it is doing both: execute top-down strategies and foster bottom-up initiatives driving innovation in urban life. 

 

Ray

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Smart cities: Opportunities for startups

Smart cities: Opportunities for startups | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
A rapid increase in urban growth and a desire to reduce environmental impact are creating new challenges for cities in areas such as energy use, mobility, security, and governance.

Via Manu Fernandez
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Is it really? Are there more startup opportunities within the smart city dynamics or are there more startup opportunities in the urban landscape at the cross section of technology, media, and innovation in any case?

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Dismantling the smart city | Libertine

Dismantling the smart city | Libertine | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
Adam Greenfield asks who really stands to benefit from the development of smart cities?

Via Manu Fernandez
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Adam Greenfield challenges the smart city mania - a different angle. Surely putting smart cities in the right perspective

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5 Ways To Reframe Your Thinking To Be More Like Elon Musk

5 Ways To Reframe Your Thinking To Be More Like Elon Musk | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
How do innovative minds like Elon Musk and Steve Jobs come up with their groundbreaking ideas? Here's five ways they think differently.

Via Marty Koenig
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

As an avvid lifehacker I try to see connections where others don't. This scoop and its article I find a nice read and sparks my imagination . Ray

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Bettina Ascaino's curator insight, December 10, 2013 10:30 PM
[Marty Koenig's ]

The article says, "The idea here is that often an opportunity reveals itself to you because you see the interconnection of two things, the interdependence of things, that others cannot see."

 

So can this ability be taught? Is it genetic?

I have thought about this for a long time, too.

 

My youngest son and I both have an enhanced ability to connect things that aren't normally connected. To visualize patterns that other's likely haven't thought of. 

 

Here's one: I'm a CFO and a CMO. I've had both roles at the same company. More than once. Go figure. Not that I'm comparing myself to Musk and Jobs. 

 

There has been quite a bit of talk lately on how these two don't see eye-to-eye. One is left-brained, and te other is right-brained, never the two shall meet. 

 

I believe that when someone is super curious, they learn things that other's don't. When one that has explored work and life through a variety of glassese, instead of getting pigeon-holed in a career or doing one thing for a very long time, they can apply their whole mind to creative solutioning. 

 

If a structured way to increase this ability exists, or proves successful, that's awesome. In the end, I believe it's quite simple: Give kids and adults a way to easily build new mental models (ala Jean Piaget) or in other words, more neural connections not only between the left and right brain, but within sections of the whole brain. 

 

That's my two cents on it. 

 

This article is enhanced by Marty Koenig, curator of several topics on scoop.it. http://scoop.it/u/martykoenig and a fiverr Super Seller http://fiverr.com/BizGrowthCoach ;

 
Brett.Ashley.Crawford's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:59 PM

I like to think of it as "creative yet logical thinking that combats common sense" :-)

Nacho Vega's curator insight, December 11, 2013 4:56 PM

Be #creative my friend!

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How cities can create smart societies - Cities Today

How cities can create smart societies - Cities Today | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
Without new forms of partnership, governance and citizen engagement, administrators will not be able to realise the potential of new technologies
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Balancing top-down strategies and bottom-up actions is the biggest challenge industry and city leaders are facing. It seems the smartest roadmap today for smart cities and communities. The big thing on mobilizing the energy from below is how to involve local citizens and businesses in grass roots initiatives. The other big thing, on the other hand, on mobilizing the energy from above is to take and execute a holistic approach through an overarching strategy.

 

In bits and pieces it is all there ... for grabs. However, it still takes firm action in your own city and community.

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The 10 Cities That Are Leading The Way In Urban Sustainability

The 10 Cities That Are Leading The Way In Urban Sustainability | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it

Cities are the laboratories where the most innovative ideas for surviving in the future can be tested. These 10from New York to Tokyo to Bogotawere...


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Cities get smart: urban innovation - in pictures

Cities get smart: urban innovation - in pictures | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
Forget flying cars and robots, the cities of the near future will be getting 'smart' using a combination of high- and low-tech solutions.
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Nice images of great smart ideas and smart solutions in smart approaches.

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Smart city vision statement | birminghamnewsroom.com

Smart city vision statement | birminghamnewsroom.com | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
The things that need to be done to prepare Birmingham for the challenges of the future have been published in a vision statement by the Smart City Commission…
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Birmingham, like many other cities in Europe, aims to be at the forefront of technology and innovation driving economic growth and quality of life. However, Birmingham has an immediate sense of urgency. B. is ranked 9th of most deprived local authorities in England; 35% of children are below poverty rate and unemployment rate is twice the national average. All the more the reason to have an ambitious smart city vision statement. And more to come! Birmingham, academia and business have founded a commission to develop a long term plan that will be presented in Summer 2013.

 

What I find interesting is the new partnerships that will arise; new partner ecosystems; new ways of governance and new financial economic models, I am sure.

 

I am also eager to understand how the so called Smart Development Blueprint will be shaped based on 7 priority areas of work:

 

1. Leadersship & Ownership;

2. Exploiting Technologies;

3. Service Transformation;

4. New Information Marketplaces;

5. Supporting Innovation;

6. Closing The Digital Divide;

7. Profiling & Influencing.

 

Look forward to the action plan and roadmap. To be continued.

 

Ray

Smart Cities Strategies

 

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10 Best Social Media for Nonprofit Fundraising & Engagement Posts from 2012

10 Best Social Media for Nonprofit Fundraising & Engagement Posts from 2012 | Smart Cities Strategies | Scoop.it
We are continuing with our “Best of 2012” series that we started yesterday with the 10 Best Nonprofit Fundraising Posts from 2012 by ranking our best social media related posts. We began a Social M...
Raymond Versteegh's insight:

Discover & Share the best at the intersection of innovation, crowdfunding and social entrepreneurial initiatives

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Country clean-up project "Lets Do It 2008" / Teeme Ära 2008

It is a classic.

 

This video of the campaign "Let's Do It!" - a grassroot initiative to clean up the country from illegal waste in just one day.

 

When watching the vid I find it still inspiring & amazing.

 

Cause of the power of a single idea. Three people. Rounding up 50.000 people. Get them into action on one particular day.

 

It inspires me to look out for an idea in any field. And when it feels right to just do it. With the lessons learned from this fantastic experience.

 

Most of all this project shows me that people will come into action and 'give back' on a thing that they feel passionate about and find important.

 

To me this beautiful initiative is a powerful example how people and communities come into action through a bottum up strategy and rely on the creativity and intelligence of the 'spontaneous order from below'.

 

Enjoy! Ray

 

===

 

Some Data Points:

=> One single idea - clean up 10.000 ton of waste in one day - came to life by 3 people: Toomas Trapida, Kadri Allikmae and Rainer Nolvak;

=> Within 2 weeks they rounded up a core team of 20 volunteers that grew quickly to 620 people - the best professionals of the country;

=> 50.000 people came into action, being 4% of the population of Estonia;

=> In normal circumstance it would take government 3 yrs and 22.5M euro doing the thing on May 3rd 2008. The real costs were 1/2M euro and it took just one day to do it - cleaning up the country.

 

The 5-steps To Success:

1. Teambuilding - inspire & connect and involve the best professionals in Estonia - for free;

2. Engaging partners - institutions, governments, communities;

3. Mapping the garbage - using new technologies; smartphones, digital pictures, location based tech, google earth mapping;

4. Communication - leaders in the community ranging from politics to entertainment 'put a voice and face' to the campaign;

5. Registration - two weeks before d-day just 10.000 people had registered however 50.000 people came into action on May 3rd 2008 collecting 10.000 ton of waste across the country - really amazing!

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