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Bot & Dolly and the Rise of Creative Robots

Bot & Dolly and the Rise of Creative Robots | smart cities | Scoop.it
The design studio, acquired last year by Google and best known for its work on the film Gravity, specializes in robots for use in movies, architecture, and digital fabrication (The Future of Human-Machine Interaction Is Taking Shape...
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Volvo, Ferrari, And Mercedes First To Add iOS In The Car Next Week | TechCrunch

Volvo, Ferrari, And Mercedes First To Add iOS In The Car Next Week  | TechCrunch | smart cities | Scoop.it
iOS in the Car, announced by Eddy Cue last year at the iOS 7 launch, was supposed to appear in 2014 and, according to the Financial Times, it's finally coming..

Via Tiaan Jonker
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Super-Intelligent Computers Could Enslave Humanity Says Oxford University. (Or They'll Just Kill Us.)

Super-Intelligent Computers Could Enslave Humanity Says Oxford University. (Or They'll Just Kill Us.) | smart cities | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence poses an "extinction risk" to human civilisation, an Oxford University professor has said.

Via Ben Hendry
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Ben Hendry's curator insight, March 15, 5:23 AM

Stuart Armstrong of the Future of Humanity Institute - a philosophical faculty of Oxford University - questions human understanding of Artificial Intelligence.

 

Armstrong gives the example of an Antivirus program that's dedicated to filtering the viruses out of emails. He asks what's going to stop an intelligent machine from making an inference that the best way to stop the viruses is to simply stop the emails arriving in the first place. 

 

Armstrong admits that although Artificial intelligence is still in its infancy; it's important to raise these ethical questions and issues early. As it may take "- just one developer [to come] up with a "neat algorithm" that no one else had thought to construct" for us to achieve true computer intelligence.


He finishes by saying that it's important "- [we] try to adjust society ourselves before the AI adjusts it for us."

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Machines that can learn could replace half of American jobs in the next decade ... - Financial Post

Machines that can learn could replace half of American jobs in the next decade ... - Financial Post | smart cities | Scoop.it
Financial Post
Machines that can learn could replace half of American jobs in the next decade ...

Via Ben Hendry
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Ben Hendry's curator insight, March 15, 1:29 AM

"Intelligent machines" threaten to cut jobs through the optimisation of mundane processes. 

 

Aki Ito provides the example of Minneapolis attorney William Greene who faced the unenviable "- task of combing through 1.3 million electronic documents [for] a recent case". Instead of hiring more personnel and human labor to complete this task he turned to "intelligent software".

 

This software "learned" from Greene's associates, who had combed through a small sample size of the documentation and "taught" the software their reasoning and search logic, which enabled the documents to be sorted by relevance.

 

Enabling a machine to "learn" through past experiences, emulation, and trial and error "- relieve[s] engineers of the need to write out every command" and for machines to "learn" in a way similarly to humans.

 

With the software, Greene's firm got through the documents in under 600 hours. Assuming they maintained that speed, that same task without the software would have taken 13,000 hours (or over twenty times the length of time).

 

A twenty-fold increase in productivity is astounding. It equates to:

 

Minimum wage in Australia: $16.37 per hour [fairwork.gov.au]

 

12,400 * 16.37 = $202,988 worth of man hours saved by implementing and utilising this technology.

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10 Roles For Artificial Intelligence In Education

10 Roles For Artificial Intelligence In Education | smart cities | Scoop.it
10 Roles For Artificial Intelligence In Education

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Ben Hendry
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Morgan Travis's curator insight, March 27, 10:36 PM

Teachthought.com report all the important uses that AI may serve in the education industry. All of the 10 points in these are positive.

 

Leaving out the fact that the advancements in AI may have the possibility of taking educators jobs (along with many other jobs). Although this is an advanced idea, it is still a possibility within the future. But do all these positivies outweigh the negative? 

Daryl Nazareth's curator insight, March 28, 3:34 AM

Uses of AI

 

Yuta Jones's curator insight, March 28, 5:54 AM

The advent of better and better AI means interesting things in many different areas. This article describes the role AI could have in education, and it certainly paints an interesting picture. Certainly, AI looks to be one area that will only grow in importance, and likely in very significant ways.

 

While the article focuses on education, it's certainly possible with the ideas from this article to better imagine what effects AI could have elsewhere. It can be good to try to think ahead, especially with regards to important, growing technologies such as this.

 

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Snohetta Creates An Urban Oasis For The Riyadh Metro in Saudi Arabia

Snohetta Creates An Urban Oasis For The Riyadh Metro in Saudi Arabia | smart cities | Scoop.it

Saudi Arabia’s Riyadh is swelling in both population and capital, creating a new impetus for a metro system to solve its transit woes.

 

The Snohetta design aims to create an oasis at the center of a large public plaza. A large canopy would shade the public space as well as admit light to the underground station. Downward ramps allow for a gentle entry to the system. Palm trees will be aligned with an adjacent mosque, and thus Mecca, while limestone will extend to the site’s edges, signaling the openness and availability of the space to the public. Irrigation channels will both keep the trees alive, as well as provide some evaporative cooling to the space, making it a true urban oasis.

 

The architects write: “Our proposal for the Downtown Metro provides not only a beacon for a new urban awareness in the city but also a public space, an arena for all the citizens of Riyadh, a citizen space promoting public ownership and a new era of Social Sustainability and civic urban pride.”


Via Lauren Moss, John Lasschuit ®™
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Economics and Big Data - A Match Made In Heaven?

Economics and Big Data - A Match Made In Heaven? | smart cities | Scoop.it

I’ve said many times that I think there is an important role that folks with an economics background can play in the world of Big Data. Maybe it’s wishful thinking on my part to believe that I can find my son Alec (who is an Economics major from Saint Mary’s College in Moraga, CA) a job in Big Data. But he’s got his own, more exciting dreams (heck, what could be more exciting than a world of Hadoop, R, MapReduce, Yarn, Pig, Stinger, Oink, Zookeeper…). But seriously, let’s examine why a team member with an economics background might be a valuable addition to your Big Data team.


Via John Lasschuit ®™
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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, March 12, 9:14 AM

Bill Schmarzo about the added value of #BigData to #Economics

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David Cameron sets sights on 5G and the Internet of Things - Why it matters

David Cameron sets sights on 5G and the Internet of Things - Why it matters | smart cities | Scoop.it
U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron announced that he and Germany's Prime Minister Angela Merkel will be leading us all into the future with 5G Internet. With its epic speeds and amazing performance, 5G will spearhead the push to develop the infrastructure needed for the Internet of Things.

Via Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, March 12, 12:03 AM

PM Cameron basically says  "sod off" to US, Koreans, Japanese and Chinese companies - see last quote of article.


Cameron announces that he will throw £45 million more behind research for the IoT which will be supported by 5G Internet connections (projected 10Gbps speed).


Devices and appliances that are connected to the Internet, can be remotely controlled by smartphone and tablet users, meaning that people will be able to make sure that they turned to the stove, heat, lights, water and other things off before they left home. In addition to saving people money, it will help decrease our carbon footprint over time.


"I see the Internet of Things as a huge transformative development a way of boosting productivity of keeping us healthier making transport more efficient reducing energy needs, tackling climate change," Cameron said.


"Take British ingenuity in software, services and design add German excellence in engineering and industrial manufacturing and together we can lead in this new revolution," Cameron concluded.


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Berners-Lee seeks web 'Magna Carta'

Berners-Lee seeks web 'Magna Carta' | smart cities | Scoop.it

The inventor of the world wide web has marked the 25th anniversary of his creation by calling for a 'Magna Carta' bill of rights to protect its users.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee told BBC Breakfast the issue could be compared to the importance of human rights.

He has been an outspoken critic of government surveillance following a series of leaks from ex-US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden.

Sir Tim called on people to take action and protest against surveillance.


Via Wildcat2030
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Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from Science and Technology Today
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How would humanity change if we knew aliens existed?

How would humanity change if we knew aliens existed? | smart cities | Scoop.it
“ We have yet to discover any signs of an extraterrestrial civilization — a prospect that could quite literally change overnight. Should that happen, our sense of ourselves and our place in the cosmos would forever be shaken. It could even change the course of human history. Or would it?”
Via Religulous
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The New Rules of Robot/Human Society

As technology speeds forward, humans are beginning to imagine the day when robots will fill the roles promised to us in science fiction. But what should we be thinking about today, as robots like military and delivery drones become a real part of our society? How should robots be programmed to interact with us? How should we treat robots? And who is responsible for a robot's actions? As we look at the unexpected impact of new technologies, we are obligated as a society to consider the moral and ethical implications of robotics.
Via Szabolcs Kósa
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3D Printshow New York: Fashion And Technology Converge In Live Catwalk Show Dedicated To Wearable Tech

3D Printshow New York: Fashion And Technology Converge In Live Catwalk Show Dedicated To Wearable Tech | smart cities | Scoop.it
“3D Printshow New York kicks off Wednesday, February 12 with a live catwalk show that features the latest 3D printed fashions and wearable tech designs.”
Via Richard Platt
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Unified Internet of Knowledge - 256 bit Computing Changes Everything in 2022

Unified Internet of Knowledge - 256 bit Computing Changes Everything in 2022 | smart cities | Scoop.it
For the first time in human history, one logical 256 bit computer will be able to directly address every bit and byte of memory and every device on the Internet. In effect, it will gain direct access to all stored human knowledge. Machine to machine communication will be direct. The 128 bit addresses of IPv6, which allow 4.8×1028 individual addresses on the Internet, would be a very small subset of the 256 bit address space. Not only would individual devices be online as now, but it will be possible to map device memory and address that directly - in effect writing content directly to a TV screen, an MP3 player, your watch, and maybe even your brain.
Via brianlmerritt
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SeeSpace InAiR The World's 1st Augmented Television


Via Tiaan Jonker
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Facebook rumoured to be in talks to buy drones

Facebook rumoured to be in talks to buy drones | smart cities | Scoop.it
Facebook is tipped to buy up Texas-based Titan Aerospace to bring affordable internet access to Africa via drones that can fly for five years at a time.
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Ravi Bhatia's curator insight, March 10, 2:19 AM
Facebook rumoured to be in talks to buy drones
Emmanuel Gigante's curator insight, March 10, 8:37 AM

#like?

Techstore's curator insight, March 14, 10:32 AM

Facebook rumoured to be in talks to buy drones #facebook #technology #drones

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4 Big Opportunities in Artificial Intelligence

4 Big Opportunities in Artificial Intelligence | smart cities | Scoop.it
Google's acquisition of DeepMind is yet another sign the future of artificial intelligence is here. Check out some of the big ideas AI startups are pursuing.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman, Ben Hendry
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Ben Hendry's curator insight, March 15, 5:52 AM

Issie Lapowsky examines "- a few [of the] emerging applications of artificial intelligence" and how Google's acquisition of artificial intelligence start-up DeepMind for US$400 million is evidence that this technology is here now.

 

Lapowsky states that "there's a difference between having the data on hand and truly understanding it" and adds that entrepreneurs are beginning to finance and create computers which are capable of not only "- synthesiz[ing] the data, but interpret[ing] it, too".

 

The robotics industry is also expanding, not only are they now built to perform rudimentary manufacturing tasks, but construction of autonomous robots like in the case of Hanson Robotics, are "capable of carrying [out] a conversation (albeit a peculiar one) and recalling personal history."

 

The advancements in the synthesis of data by these intelligences is also paving the way for computers to understand human emotion. "The idea [being] that by understanding emotions, artificially intelligent technology could predict a person's needs in drastically more human ways."

 

Artificial Technology will undoubtedly help bridge that gap between machine and man and allow each to operate in a productive union.

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Rise of the Robots--The Future of Artificial Intelligence: Scientific American

Rise of the Robots--The Future of Artificial Intelligence: Scientific American | smart cities | Scoop.it
By 2050 robot "brains" based on computers that execute 100 trillion instructions per second will start rivaling human intelligence (Rise of the Robots--The Future of Artificial Intelligence http://t.co/apbbzoIxmP)...

Via Scott Turner, Ben Hendry
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Ben Hendry's curator insight, March 15, 3:16 AM

Hans Moravec a chief scientist of Seegrid Corporation - a robotics company - believes that computer "intelligence" will continue to increase exponentially.


He hypothesises that "- by 2050 [computers] will be capable of executing trillions of instructions each second." His vision for such an increase in computing power is supported by Moore's Law which is the observation that, over the history of computing hardware, the number of transistors on integrated circuits doubles approximately every two years, which results in an increase in computational power.

 

This law has held true since the invention of the integrated circuit in 1958. If the "law" continues on that trend, not only will "smarter" machines begin to appear but the machines will become cheaper and more available. 

 

Increasing the number of instructions per second a computer can perform allows the machine to peruse data faster, forecast it more effectively, and ultimately react to it in a way which will benefit humans by providing more accurate models in real-time.

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What will our cities sound like in the future?

What will our cities sound like in the future? | smart cities | Scoop.it
Machinery, traffic and other people make our existence loud as hell – but can we use technology to retune the urban world? (What will our cities sound like in the future?
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Is anyone asking people what they want from the smart cities of the future?

Is anyone asking people what they want from the smart cities of the future? | smart cities | Scoop.it

Future cities, where infrastructure adapts to our needs, offer are an enticing prospect. But who is in the driving seat as these urban developments crop up around the world? We need to make sure that the people who will actually live in these cities benefit.

 

I recently attended a government meeting about future cities and found that all the discussion related to branding, bio-tech innovation, hi-tech transport infrastructure and opportunities for universities. I pointed out that at least half the population don’t engage with such things directly, if at all. Most everyday people are more concerned with how to get by and even how to survive in an increasingly hostile city. One civil servant replied “oh you mean the dark underbelly …”. This, it seems to me, is exactly how elevated mandarins in London see normal people who live in inner city communities.


Via John Lasschuit ®™
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good question!

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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, March 12, 9:11 AM

Gary Graham on The Conversation shares his view on what a #smartcity should be

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The Internet of Things – There’s no stopping it!

The Internet of Things – There’s no stopping it! | smart cities | Scoop.it
“The Internet of things is coming, be the disrupter or prepare to be disrupted. There’s no stopping it” said Joe Tucci, CEO of EMC, during this year’ Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

Via Patrick Bouillaud, massimo facchinetti
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3D Printed House Plans

3D Printed House Plans | smart cities | Scoop.it
When it comes to designing a home from the ground up, home builders often have a difficult time showing customers the completed results from drawings alone. Customers want to see how their house will look – before it is actually built, so they can make needed changes beforehand.Thanks to 3D printing technology though, that is now possible. The Plan Collection is an online house plan provider that has recently announced that they are incorporating 3D printing into their business, to allow customers to receive a 3D printed model of their prospective homes – in a smaller scale. It gives the homeowners a 3D printed model of their home, which is like a physical blueprint that they can actually see.
Via Annie Theunissen
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This Giant Floating Farm Uses Melting Icebergs To Bring Local Food To Greenland

This Giant Floating Farm Uses Melting Icebergs To Bring Local Food To Greenland | smart cities | Scoop.it

“ The Arctic Harvester gathers up freshwater to feed hydroponic greenhouses--and an 800-person on-board community.”


Via Alan Yoshioka, Pedro Santiago
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10 'Star Trek' Technologies That Actually Exist

10 'Star Trek' Technologies That Actually Exist | smart cities | Scoop.it
“ These technologies got their start in the scripts, but they're now as real as the Higgs boson and its attendant field.”
Via Rudolf Kabutz
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10 Failed Utopian Cities That Influenced the Future

10 Failed Utopian Cities That Influenced the Future | smart cities | Scoop.it
“Some of the most famous cities in history were never built. These 10 Utopian cities may have been failures, but they expressed our ideas about what the future of human civilization could look like. And many ideas contained in them continue to influence us today.”
Via Fab GOUX-BAUDIMENT
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Don’t Like Wearable Tech? Wait a Year or Two - Techly

Don’t Like Wearable Tech? Wait a Year or Two - Techly | smart cities | Scoop.it
“Wearable technology is one of the buzziest phrases of 2014 - if you pay a gram of attention to tech, you can’t escape it - but while the buzz may be strong”
Via Richard Platt
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