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iTEC - Designing the Future Classroom

iTEC - Designing the Future Classroom | smart cities | Scoop.it

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, July 29, 2013 10:58 AM

iTEC is about designing the future classroom. The project, which involves 15 Ministries of Education from across Europe, brings together teachers, policymakers, pedagogical experts - representatives from each stage of the educational processes - to introduce innovative teaching practices.



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The Internet of Things and the Future of Farming

The Internet of Things and the Future of Farming | smart cities | Scoop.it

The Internet of Things — the vision of a world brimming with communicating sensors and digital smarts — occupies the peak of Gartner’s most recent “hype cycle.” And a report released two months ago by the McKinsey Global Institute laid out the potential multitrillion-dollar payoff from the emerging technology.


At a two-day workshop last week in San Jose, Calif., hosted by the National Science Foundation and the National Consortium for Data Science, a few dozen academics, corporate technologists and government officials met and mostly wrestled with the thorny technical and policy issues that must be addressed if the potential of the Internet of Things is to be realized. They were working to come up with a research agenda to make practical progress on challenges like security, privacy and standards. A glimpse of the looming security concerns came two weeks ago, when Fiat Chrysler recalled 1.4 million vehicles after two researchers hacked into a Jeep Cherokee and showed they could remotely control its engine, brakes and steering.


But the Silicon Valley gathering also underlined the societal needs that Internet-of-Things technology could help address. Lance Donny, founder of an agricultural technology start-up, OnFarm Systems, gave a wide-ranging talk that laid out the history of farming and presented the case for its data-driven future. Inexpensive sensors, cloud computing and intelligent software, he suggested, hold the potential to transform agriculture and help feed the world’s growing population.


Venture capitalists seem to share some of Mr. Donny’s optimism. In the first half of this year, venture investment in so-called agtech start-ups reached $2.06 billion in 228 deals, according to a studypublished last week by AgFunder, an equity crowdfunding platform for agricultural technology. The half-year total was close to the $2.36 billion raised in all of 2014, which was a record year


In his presentation, Mr. Donny placed the progression of farming in three stages. The first, preindustrial agriculture, dating from before Christ to about 1920, consisted of labor-intensive, essentially subsistence farming on small farms, which took two acres to feed one person. In the second stage, industrial agriculture, from 1920 to about 2010, tractors and combine harvesters, chemical fertilizers and seed science opened the way to large commercial farms. One result has been big gains in productivity, with one acre feeding five people.


The third stage, which Mr. Donny calls Ag 3.0, is just getting underway and involves exploiting data from many sources — sensors on farm equipment and plants, satellite images and weather tracking. In the near future, the use of water and fertilizer will be measured and monitored in detail, sometimes on a plant-by-plant basis.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Richard Platt's curator insight, August 13, 12:02 PM

The third stage, which Lance Donny, founder of an agricultural technology start-up, OnFarm Systems, calls Ag 3.0, is just getting underway and involves exploiting data from many sources — sensors on farm equipment and plants, satellite images and weather tracking. In the near future, the use of water and fertilizer will be measured and monitored in detail, sometimes on a plant-by-plant basis.

Mr. Donny, who was raised on a family farm in Fresno, Calif., that grew table grapes and raisin grapes, said the data-rich approach to decision making represented a sharp break with tradition. “It’s a totally different world than walking out on the farmland, kicking the dirt and making a decision based on intuition,” he said.  The benefits should be higher productivity and more efficient use of land, water and fertilizer. But it will also, Mr. Donny said, help satisfy the rising demand for transparency in farming. Consumers, he noted, increasingly want to know where their food came from, how much water and chemicals were used, and when and how it was harvested. “Data is the only way that can be done,” Mr. Donny said.  In the United States, major agriculture companies are making sizable investments to position themselves for data-driven farming. John Deere, for example, wants to make the farm tractor a data-control center in the field. Monsanto made a big move with its $930 million purchase in 2013 of Climate Corporation, a weather data-analysis company started by two Google alumni. American farmers are embracing the technology, though warily at times.    Yet the most intriguing use of the technology may well be outside the United States. By 2050, the global population is projected to reach nine billion, up from 7.3 billion today. Large numbers of people entering the middle class, especially in China and India, and adopting middle-class eating habits — like consuming more meat, which requires more grain — only adds to the burden.

To close the food gap, worldwide farm productivity will have to increase from 1.5 tons of grain per acre to 2.5 tons by 2050, according to Mr. Donny. American farm productivity is already above that level, at 2.75 tons of grain per acre.   “But you can’t take the U.S. model and transport it to the world,” Mr. Donny said, noting that American farming is both highly capital-intensive and large scale. The average farm size in the United States is 450 acres. In Africa, the average is about two acres.   “The rest of the world has to get the productivity gains with data,” he said.

Ed Crowley's curator insight, August 14, 9:01 AM

High tech agriculture + high tech farming + Iot = Solving the worlds food problems???

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Chinese Search Company Baidu Built a Giant Artificial-Intelligence Supercomputer

Chinese Search Company Baidu Built a Giant Artificial-Intelligence Supercomputer | smart cities | Scoop.it

Chinese search giant Baidu says it has invented a powerful supercomputer that brings new muscle to an artificial-intelligence technique giving software more power to understand speech, images, and written language.


The new computer, called Minwa and located in Beijing, has 72 powerful processors and 144 graphics processors, known as GPUs. Late Monday, Baidu released a paper claiming that the computer had been used to train machine-learning software that set a new record for recognizing images, beating a previous mark set by Google.


“Our company is now leading the race in computer intelligence,” said Ren Wu, a Baidu scientist working on the project, speaking at the Embedded Vision Summit on Tuesday. Minwa’s computational power would probably put it among the 300 most powerful computers in the world if it weren’t specialized for deep learning, said Wu. “I think this is the fastest supercomputer dedicated to deep learning,” he said. “We have great power in our hands—much greater than our competitors.”


Computing power matters in the world of deep learning, which has produced breakthroughs in speech, image, and face recognition and improved the image-search and speech-recognition services offered by Google and Baidu.


The technique is a souped-up version of an approach first established decades ago, in which data is processed by a network of artificial neurons that manage information in ways loosely inspired by biological brains. Deep learning involves using larger neural networks than before, arranged in hierarchical layers, and training them with significantly larger collections of data, such as photos, text documents, or recorded speech.


So far, bigger data sets and networks appear to always be better for this technology, said Wu. That’s one way it differs from previous machine-learning techniques, which had begun to produce diminishing returns with larger data sets. “Once you scaled your data beyond a certain point, you couldn’t see any improvement,” said Wu. “With deep learning, it just keeps going up.” Baidu says that Minwa makes it practical to create an artificial neural network with hundreds of billions of connections—hundreds of times more than any network built before.

 

A paper released Monday is intended to provide a taste of what Minwa’s extra oomph can do. It describes how the supercomputer was used to train a neural network that set a new record on a standard benchmark for image-recognition software. The ImageNet Classification Challenge, as it is called, involves training software on a collection of 1.5 million labeled images in 1,000 different categories, and then asking that software to use what it learned to label 100,000 images it has not seen before.


Software is compared on the basis of how often its top five guesses for a given image miss the correct answer. The system trained on Baidu’s new computer was wrong only 4.58 percent of the time. The previous best was 4.82 percent, reported by Google in March. One month before that, Microsoft had reported achieving 4.94 percent, becoming the first to better average human performance of 5.1 percent.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 15, 11:57 AM

Question: What IS intelligence?

I guess we're still mistaken about this elusive term so many use on a daily basis—either to degrade or upgrade your status as a human being–without really knowing what it is. Now we're going to have "stupid" 'puters vs. "intelligent" ones. Ah, yet the question remains: Psychopaths, those "snakes in suits" in high places, they are intelligent, aren't they? Yes, of course! Otherwise they wouldn't have been able to get where they are (high places). Empathy is clearly not part of the equation.

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Smart cities are about people not technology – video - The Guardian

Smart cities are about people not technology – video - The Guardian | smart cities | Scoop.it
At a roundtable hosted by the Guardian, experts discussed how long it will take for all cities to become smart
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In a first, drug using 3D printing technology gets FDA nod - Reuters

In a first, drug using 3D printing technology gets FDA nod - Reuters | smart cities | Scoop.it
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has, for the first time, approved a drug that uses 3D printing technology, paving the way for potential customization of drugs to suit patients' needs. The drug,
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Future Space Travel Science & Technologies

Solar system watch more video here: * Like and subscribe for more videos NEW . Space Documentary 2014 Future Space Travel technologies - NEW Science ...
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Branch Technology 3D Prints Building Walls With World's Largest Freeform 3D ... - 3DPrint.com

Branch Technology 3D Prints Building Walls With World's Largest Freeform 3D ... - 3DPrint.com | smart cities | Scoop.it
3D printing is a technology that has more potential than most of us give it credit for. Reason being is that it's a fabrication process which is capable of minu
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35 Bond wearables revealed: Our favourite 007 gadgets - Wareable - Wareable

35 Bond wearables revealed: Our favourite 007 gadgets - Wareable - Wareable | smart cities | Scoop.it
Everyone knows that James Bond is fond of his gadgets but, look closer, and you'll see that it's wearables that he really loves.

Via Andy Senko CDP
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How the Internet is Becoming Part of Us

How the Internet is Becoming Part of Us | smart cities | Scoop.it
The author of Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind says the merging of man and machine will be the “greatest evolution in biology."

Via John Lasschuit ®™
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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, July 20, 6:23 AM

Prof Yuval Noah Harari: 

it is likely in the next 200 years or so Homo sapiens will upgrade themselves into some idea of a divine being
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The Machines Are Coming

The Machines Are Coming | smart cities | Scoop.it

Low-wage jobs are no longer the only ones at risk.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, April 19, 6:28 AM

Machines aren’t used because they perform some tasks that much better than humans, but because, in many cases, they do a “good enough” job while also being cheaper, more predictable and easier to control than quirky, pesky humans. Technology in the workplace is as much about power and control as it is about productivity and efficiency.


I also encourage you to check out these related stories: 


Gary Bamford's curator insight, April 20, 1:29 AM

Must start work on that ironing algorithm .....

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Why the Internet of Things is called Internet of Things

Why the Internet of Things is called Internet of Things | smart cities | Scoop.it
A comprehensive Internet of Things definition, a look at the IoT history from its birth in 1999 to now and an explanation of IoT vs M2M vs IoE vs Others.
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Richard Platt's curator insight, February 7, 12:02 AM

Just in case you didn't have an understanding of where all of these technologies fit within one another.

Renato Machado Costa's curator insight, February 14, 9:32 PM

Very nice IoT definitions and insights!

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Scientists Report Finding Reliable Way to Teleport Data

Scientists Report Finding Reliable Way to Teleport Data | smart cities | Scoop.it
It’s not “Star Trek,” but the physicists say they can send quantum information from one electron to another 10 feet away with perfect accuracy.
Via José Gonçalves, Margarida Sá Costa
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The Power of Story Over The Brain: Content Creation Know-How

The Power of Story Over The Brain: Content Creation Know-How | smart cities | Scoop.it
“ The experiential nature of content creation through storytelling enables you to communicate your brand narrative.”
Via Karen Dietz, João Paulo Alexandre
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corneja's curator insight, November 17, 2014 6:52 PM

"According to a research conducted by anthropologist Robin Dunbar, personal stories account for 65 percent of our conversations." I suppose that many topics really may be considered as personal stories, but we are not aware of it. This an interesting point of view.

Marco Favero's curator insight, November 18, 2014 8:29 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

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A new digital ecology is evolving, and humans are being left behind

A new digital ecology is evolving, and humans are being left behind | smart cities | Scoop.it
“ Incomprehensible computer behaviors have evolved out of high-frequency stock trading, and humans aren't sure why. Eventually, it could start affecting high-tech warfare, too.”
Via RomanGodzich
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Is artificial intelligence really an existential threat to humanity?

Is artificial intelligence really an existential threat to humanity? | smart cities | Scoop.it

Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies is an astonishing book with an alarming thesis: Intelligent machines are “quite possibly the most important and most daunting challenge humanity has ever faced.” In it, Oxford University philosopher Nick Bostrom, who has built his reputation on the study of “existential risk,” argues forcefully that artificial intelligence might be the most apocalyptic technology of all. With intellectual powers beyond human comprehension, he prognosticates, self-improving artificial intelligences could effortlessly enslave or destroy Homo sapiens if they so wished. While he expresses skepticism that such machines can be controlled, Bostrom claims that if we program the right “human-friendly” values into them, they will continue to uphold these virtues, no matter how powerful the machines become.


These views have found an eager audience. In August 2014, PayPal cofounder and electric car magnate Elon Musk tweeted “Worth reading Superintelligence by Bostrom. We need to be super careful with AI. Potentially more dangerous than nukes.” Bill Gates declared, “I agree with Elon Musk and some others on this and don’t understand why some people are not concerned.” More ominously, legendary astrophysicist Stephen Hawking concurred: “I think the development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race.” Proving his concern went beyond mere rhetoric, Musk donated $10 million to the Future of Life Institute “to support research aimed at keeping AI beneficial for humanity.”


Superintelligence is propounding a solution that will not work to a problem that probably does not exist, but Bostrom and Musk are right that now is the time to take the ethical and policy implications of artificial intelligence seriously. The extraordinary claim that machines can become so intelligent as to gain demonic powers requires extraordinary evidence, particularly since artificial intelligence (AI) researchers have struggled to create machines that show much evidence of intelligence at all. While these investigators’ ultimate goals have varied since the emergence of the discipline in the mid-1950s, the fundamental aim of AI has always been to create machines that demonstrate intelligent behavior, whether to better understand human cognition or to solve practical problems.


Some AI researchers even tried to create the self-improving reasoning machines Bostrom fears. Through decades of bitter experience, however, they learned not only that creating intelligence is more difficult than they initially expected, but also that it grows increasingly harder the smarter one tries to become. Bostrom’s concept of “superintelligence,” which he defines as “any intellect that greatly exceeds the cognitive performance of humans in virtually all domains of interest,” builds upon similar discredited assumptions about the nature of thought that the pioneers of AI held decades ago. A summary of Bostrom’s arguments, contextualized in the history of artificial intelligence, demonstrates how this is so.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Nelly Renard's curator insight, August 13, 12:46 PM

With intellectual powers beyond human comprehension, he prognosticates, self-improving artificial intelligences could effortlessly enslave or destroy Homo sapiens if they so wished. While he expresses skepticism that such machines can be controlled, Bostrom claims that if we program the right “human-friendly” values into them, they will continue to uphold these virtues, no matter how powerful the machines become.

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Internet of Everything: Technologies & Minds (How the future is happening now)

Internet of Everything: Technologies & Minds  (How the future is happening now) | smart cities | Scoop.it
The Internet of Everything (IoE) represents the next “world-changing” revolution, after the Industrial Revolution of 1750 – 1900, and following the Computer & Internet revolution which started in the 1950’s.
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A smart city is more than just technology - The Hindu

A smart city is more than just technology - The Hindu | smart cities | Scoop.it
t a time when cities in India are competing to earn the distinction of being smart, the concept of a ‘smart city’ has to cover more than smart mobility and governance; in fact, other factors of wellness have to be facto...
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Digi Technology Enables Smart Cities Worldwide - Environmental Leader

Digi Technology Enables Smart Cities Worldwide - Environmental Leader | smart cities | Scoop.it
Smart technology by Digi International enables increased operational efficiencies, reduced response times and better levels of citizen services in smart city initiative, the M2M technology company says.
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The future is here: 3D printing, coming home to you soon...

The future is here: 3D printing, coming home to you soon... | smart cities | Scoop.it
With IBM’s recent announcement that it has overcome hurdles that would have stopped them from producing even smaller computer components, thus confirming Moore’s law that the power of electronics will increase exponentially every year, 3D printing...
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By 2018, 62% Of CRM Will Be Cloud-Based, And The Cloud Computing Market Will Reach $127.5B

By 2018, 62% Of CRM Will Be Cloud-Based, And The Cloud Computing Market Will Reach $127.5B | smart cities | Scoop.it
The cloud computing market is growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 22.8% from 2014 to 2018, and will reach $127.5B by 2018.

Via massimo facchinetti
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miApples - tech/social/news: THE FUTURE IS NOW IN THE DRONES .. Inside Facebook's Connectivity Lab (VIDEO)

miApples - tech/social/news: THE FUTURE IS NOW IN THE DRONES .. Inside Facebook's Connectivity Lab (VIDEO) | smart cities | Scoop.it

Via miApples
Margarida Sá Costa's insight:

THE FUTURE IS NOW IN THE DRONES .. 

Inside Facebook's Connectivity Lab (VIDEO) 

 

http://miapplesinteractive.blogspot.com/2015/07/the-future-is-on-way-inside-facebooks.html

 

#FUTURE, #Internet, #Connectivity, #Facebook, #ConnectivityLab, #Videos, #miApples, #miApplesUTube, #Drones, #Aircraft, #Lasers, #NEW, #Technology,

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miApples 's curator insight, July 30, 5:36 PM

THE FUTURE IS NOW IN THE DRONES .. 

Inside Facebook's Connectivity Lab (VIDEO) 

 

http://miapplesinteractive.blogspot.com/2015/07/the-future-is-on-way-inside-facebooks.html

 

#FUTURE, #Internet, #Connectivity, #Facebook, #ConnectivityLab, #Videos, #miApples, #miApplesUTube, #Drones, #Aircraft, #Lasers, #NEW, #Technology,

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Ray Kurzweil's Mind-Boggling Predictions for the Next 25 Years

Ray Kurzweil's Mind-Boggling Predictions for the Next 25 Years | smart cities | Scoop.it

Ray Kurzweil is the principal inventor of many technologies ranging from the first CCD flatbed scanner to the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind. He is also the chancellor and co-founder of Singularity University, and the guy tagged by Larry Page to direct artificial intelligence development at Google.



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, February 24, 1:01 PM

Well, interesting... especially e.g. the computing capacity vs all human minds diagram...:-)))

Jerome Driessen's curator insight, March 26, 8:02 AM

An article about one of the world's most renowned and qualified futurists, Ray Kurzweil, and his predictions regarding the exponential growth of computing in the next 25 years.

"I want to make an important point.

It’s not about the predictions.

It’s about what the predictions represent."



 

Diamandis, P. (2015, January 2015). Ray Kurzweil’s Mind-Boggling Predictions for the Next 25 Years. Retrieved March 26, 2015, from http://singularityhub.com/2015/01/26/ray-kurzweils-mind-boggling-predictions-for-the-next-25-years/

Elías Manuel Sánchez Castañeda's curator insight, April 30, 12:45 PM
The theory of spiral dynamics Dr. Don Beck says that humanity lives today to speak with my words in "different times", so to some impressive advances in the science and technology are not very significant, while the more advanced, more aware, people dealing analyze both the positive aspects of science and technology, and the possible dangers to them the question needs to be controlled artificial intelligence? It makes perfect sense.
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7 Futurists On What To Expect In The Next Decade

7 Futurists On What To Expect In The Next Decade | smart cities | Scoop.it

From smartphone apps that can do seemingly everything to driverless cars and eerily humanlike robots, the past decade has seen dramatic advances in science and technology. What amazing advances are we likely to see in the next 10 years?

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, May 17, 9:10 AM

Here's a few predictions from the article: 


  • The Internet will evolve into a brain-net.
  • 3D printers will print clothing at very low cost.
  • Apps designed by medical professionals will provide efficient real-time feedback, tackle chronic conditions at a much earlier stage, and help to improve the lifestyles and life outcomes of communities in the developed and developing world.
  • Robo-surgeons will operate remotely on patients.
  • Self-driving cars will be ubiquitous, transportation itself will be automatic, clean, and cheap.



Tony Brugman (Bright & Company)'s curator insight, May 28, 9:52 AM

Cool article by Huffington Post, interviewing 7 futurists on the world of tomorrow in science and technology.

 

Some of their interesting predictions are:
Self-driving cars, a brain-connected internet, 3D printed human organs and babies delivered by robot doctors

Gary Johnsen's curator insight, June 21, 9:20 AM

Interesting comments on trends

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The Moon Now Has a Better Internet Connection Than You Thanks to NASA

The Moon Now Has a Better Internet Connection Than You Thanks to NASA | smart cities | Scoop.it
It's tough to find a good Internet speed without paying your cable provider through the nose to get it, but NASA can get you one... if you live on the Moon.

Via Guillaume Decugis
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, May 29, 2014 9:56 PM

Ready to move?

Vincent Lieser's curator insight, June 3, 2014 7:28 PM

Information overflow goes interplanetary. 

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What the Internet Thinks About—in an Interactive Infographic

What the Internet Thinks About—in an Interactive Infographic | smart cities | Scoop.it
What does the Internet care about? What articles do we share the most? Using the data from the Ahrefs Content Explorer, the people at Funders and Founders 

Via Lauren Moss
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Steve Bavister's curator insight, May 2, 5:31 AM

Interesting insight into the internet

Emilio Ruano's curator insight, May 4, 1:17 PM

At least, the concern about equality, energy and social welfare is there. I like the last one about engineers tho. Hahaha.

jose antonio gabelas's curator insight, May 15, 3:33 AM

añada su visión ...

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Google Working Feverishly To Place RFID Microchip In Your Brain - Now The End Begins

Google Working Feverishly To Place RFID Microchip In Your Brain - Now The End Begins | smart cities | Scoop.it
“ Google says that the the goal is to insert a chip inside your head for the most effortless search engine imaginable. (Google’s real goal seems to be singularity The power of computing, and the thrill of its apparently infinite...”
Via RomanGodzich
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IT's curator insight, October 6, 2013 10:04 AM

Google chce mít čipy evidentně také všude