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Graphene can host exotic new quantum electronic states at its edges

Graphene can host exotic new quantum electronic states at its edges | smart cities | Scoop.it

Graphene has become an all-purpose wonder material, spurring armies of researchers to explore new possibilities for this two-dimensional lattice of pure carbon. But new research at MIT has found additional potential for the material by uncovering unexpected features that show up under some extreme conditions — features that could render graphene suitable for exotic uses such as quantum computing.


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Michael Ravensbergen's curator insight, December 28, 2013 7:23 AM

The beauty of graphene and research!!

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Emerging ethical dilemmas in science and technology

Emerging ethical dilemmas in science and technology | smart cities | Scoop.it

As a new year approaches, the University of Notre Dame's John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology and Values has released its annual list of emerging ethical dilemmas and policy issues in science and technology for 2014.


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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, December 10, 2013 8:22 PM

The Reilly Center explores conceptual, ethical and policy issues where science and technology intersect with society from different disciplinary perspectives. Its goal is to promote the advancement of science and technology for the common good.

 

The center generates its annual list of emerging ethical dilemmas and policy issues in science and technology with the help of Reilly fellows, other Notre Dame experts and friends of the center.

 

E-trucit's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:47 AM

several interesting things

Saranne Davies's curator insight, December 12, 2013 4:48 AM

Interesting article.

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Here's What Wi-Fi Would Look Like If We Could See It

Here's What Wi-Fi Would Look Like If We Could See It | smart cities | Scoop.it

Wi-fi. It's all around us, quietly and invisibly powering our access to the world's information. But few of us have a sense of what wi-fi actually is, let alone what it would look like if we could see it. Artist Nickolay Lamm decided to shed some light on the subject. He created visualizations that imagine the size, shape, and color of wi-fi signals were they visible to the human eye. 

"I feel that by showing what wi-fi would look like if we could see it, we'd appreciate the technology that we use everyday," Lamm told me in an email. "A lot of us use technology without appreciating the complexity behind making it work."  

To estimate what this would look like, Lamm worked with M. Browning Vogel, Ph.D., an astrobiologist and former employee at NASA Ames. Dr. Vogel described the science behind wireless technology, and Lamm used the information to create the visualizations.


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Geraldine Hamilton: Body parts on a chip

It's relatively easy to imagine a new medicine, a better cure for some disease. The hard part, though, is testing it, and that can delay promising new cures for years. In this well-explained talk, Geraldine Hamilton shows how her lab creates organs and body parts on a chip, simple structures with all the pieces essential to testing new medications -- even custom cures for one specific person.


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Richard Platt's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:26 AM

We think this is an aweeome video, Geraldine Hamilton is totally awesome she is really geting at the heart of issues in the big pharma and healthcare field and addressing the issues intelligently, nothing but right on the lady, well worth every minute of this short video. Check it out it also has play in the semiconductor realm as well, (also why we like this too)

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3D Printing Aims to Deliver Organs on Demand

3D Printing Aims to Deliver Organs on Demand | smart cities | Scoop.it

Dying patients could someday receive a 3D-printed organ made from their own cells rather than wait on long lists for the short supply of organ transplants. Such a futuristic dream remains far from reality, but university labs and private companies have already taken the first careful steps by using 3D-printing technology to build tiny chunks of organs.


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Kristy Schofield's curator insight, September 28, 2013 6:31 PM

so strange!

Joshua Zemanek's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:07 PM

After reading this article, I thought that creating organs instead of taking them from donors would be so much more efficient in the world today. The only problem is that we are very far from doing so. However, we already have people creating the first steps to creating functioning artificial organs. This would very efficient and helpful for people with major health problems. The furthest they've made it was by building tiny chunks of organs, but that's still revolutionary. My connection to the U.S. is that with the number of accidents in our country, this could help with a ton of medical problems people experience.

Saghit Rethmeier's comment, October 4, 2013 9:29 AM
This is amazing, Its crazy that out techonology is advanced enough to be able to do this. Im interested to see how far it will be taken and what possibilitites there are in the future.