smart cities
12.2K views | +0 today
Follow
smart cities
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from visual data
Scoop.it!

40 Maps That Explain The Internet

40 Maps That Explain The Internet | smart cities | Scoop.it

The internet increasingly pervades our lives, delivering information to us no matter where we are. It takes a complex system of cables, servers, towers, and other infrastructure, developed over decades, to allow us to stay in touch with our friends and family so effortlessly. Here are 40 maps that will help you better understand the internet — where it came from, how it works, and how it's used by people around the world.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Well Connected Mom's curator insight, August 22, 2014 8:04 PM

Curious how the Internet started?  These maps of servers show the progression.

Coolwired's curator insight, August 31, 2014 10:04 AM

This informative site sheds light on the pervasive workings of the Internet.

Mel Leggatt's curator insight, November 20, 2014 11:36 AM

A really excellent visual resource for understanding how the Internet has and continues to evolve.

Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from green streets
Scoop.it!

NYC's Innovative New Map System Won't Leave You Lost

NYC's Innovative New Map System Won't Leave You Lost | smart cities | Scoop.it

Even for the most direction-savvy New Yorker, emerging from the dark pit of the subway can be a disorienting experience. New York City streets are bright, they’re loud, oftentimes they’re smelly, and worst of all, maps are virtually non-existent. Or at least that used to be the case.

 

Just this week, the Department of Transportation unveiled its WalkNYC initiative, a program that will bring comprehensive pedestrian maps to all five boroughs. In a city where an estimated 30 percent of all trips are made by foot and one out of every three locals can’t tell north from south, they’re probably going to come in handy.

 

Though NYC’s public transportation is top-notch and we are technically on a grid, it’s easy to get lost or overwhelmed when traveling by foot. That’s why the DOT enlisted the help of PentaCityGroup, a consortium of urban planners, engineers, designers, cartographers and geographical information specialists, to solve the problem.

Their goal? To create an information-packed map that would orient pedestrians and help them find the gems each NYC neighborhood has to offer. The first of these new information kiosks was installed earlier this week in Chinatown (they’re already located at every Citi Bike station), and it’s expected that others will be popping up in midtown Manhattan, Long Island City in Queens and Prospect Heights in Brooklyn this summer


Via Lauren Moss
more...
luiy's curator insight, July 3, 2013 8:49 AM

If the style of these maps looks familiar, that’s because it is. The design team wanted to marry the current design to the graphic language that was was established for the subway system in the late 1960s. The typeface is still Helvetica (albeit with a slight twist–the type’s square dots are now round) and it uses the same organizational conventions (white type on a dark background). “All of this was deliberately echoing the way the subways look,” Bierut explains. “We wanted people to be able to ride the subway, come out and orient themselves.” Bierut says the design of the maps is meant to be accurate, trustworthy and friendly. But not too friendly—this is New York City, after all. “We wanted these things to be beautiful in a way, but also characteristic of the best of New York.”

ParadigmGallery's comment, July 8, 2013 4:02 PM
great...can't wait to try these...
Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from green streets
Scoop.it!

How To Build The Digital Subway Map Of The Future

How To Build The Digital Subway Map Of The Future | smart cities | Scoop.it

Slow-moving bureaucracy, diverse users, risky monetization schemes, unpredictable station layouts, spotty networks, underpowered hardware. These are just some of the challenges Control Group faced in bringing the digital map of the future to the New York City subway.

How did they overcome these challenges? They used the web.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.