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Cicret: Augmented Reality Meets Wearable Computing - SERIOUS WONDER

Cicret: Augmented Reality Meets Wearable Computing - SERIOUS WONDER | smart cities | Scoop.it
Wearable computing just got a date with augmented reality, called the Cicret Bracelet. Will the pair work out? - B.J. Murphy for Serious Wonder

Via Futurist Gerd
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Futurist Gerd's curator insight, December 4, 2:33 PM

Let's get digital

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Five Ways Our Lives Could Change Drastically In The Next 5 Years

Five Ways Our Lives Could Change Drastically In The Next 5 Years | smart cities | Scoop.it
RIGHT now, at the beginning of 2014, we collectively know more than any generation did at any other time. Our world is now wired to create and collect mountains of data: through our publications, social network updates, video uploads, and tweets, the sensors surrounding us, and the supply chains that make our economy run.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Mary Martin's curator insight, January 31, 7:10 PM

This is a great article about our immediate future - and hopeful!

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Printing the Human Body: How It Works and Where It Is Headed

Printing the Human Body: How It Works and Where It Is Headed | smart cities | Scoop.it

The rise of 3D printing has introduced one of the most ground-breaking technological feats happening right now. The most exciting part, though, doesn't have anything to do with printing electronics or fancy furniture, but in producing human tissues, otherwise known as bioprinting. While it is still in its infancy, the future of bioprinting looks very bright and will eventually result in some major advances for society, whilst also saving billions for the economy this is spent on research and development.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Margarida Sá Costa, Yves Mulkers
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Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 27, 2013 1:55 PM

I can't see this saving money - but it will save lives. The technology to print exists. It is the question of how to develop stem cells into tissue types and then how to link these with the bodies complex control systems (nervous, circulatory and immune). in the best case scenario a grown organ will be recognised as self and the body systems will grow into them. However, organs are not toasters. Researchers are concentrating on easy things like skin grafts and ears at present, but like nano electronics, the future is full of potential and questions.

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 27, 2013 9:27 PM

Will HP buy Organovo, which invented and produces the NovoGen bioprinter?

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:46 PM

Such astonishingly wonderful ways to use the new 3D printing technology.

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Printing the Human Body: How It Works and Where It Is Headed

Printing the Human Body: How It Works and Where It Is Headed | smart cities | Scoop.it

The rise of 3D printing has introduced one of the most ground-breaking technological feats happening right now. The most exciting part, though, doesn't have anything to do with printing electronics or fancy furniture, but in producing human tissues, otherwise known as bioprinting. While it is still in its infancy, the future of bioprinting looks very bright and will eventually result in some major advances for society, whilst also saving billions for the economy this is spent on research and development.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 27, 2013 1:55 PM

I can't see this saving money - but it will save lives. The technology to print exists. It is the question of how to develop stem cells into tissue types and then how to link these with the bodies complex control systems (nervous, circulatory and immune). in the best case scenario a grown organ will be recognised as self and the body systems will grow into them. However, organs are not toasters. Researchers are concentrating on easy things like skin grafts and ears at present, but like nano electronics, the future is full of potential and questions.

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 27, 2013 9:27 PM

Will HP buy Organovo, which invented and produces the NovoGen bioprinter?

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:46 PM

Such astonishingly wonderful ways to use the new 3D printing technology.

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The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic

The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic | smart cities | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered where you or your children may be living in 2050?
Experts predict that by then three-quarters of the world's population will live in cities. For part of its Tomorrow's Cities season the BBC takes a look through the crystal ball to imagine what city life might be like in 40 years' time.

Find more details at the interactive graphic at the link.


Via Lauren Moss
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, August 23, 2013 4:15 PM

Here's some ideas on how we might live in the future. What do you think?

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Life-sized, human holograms could soon grace your living room

Life-sized, human holograms could soon grace your living room | smart cities | Scoop.it
Your 3D TV might not look so awesome after seeing one of these suckers.

Via TechinBiz
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Eileen Kennedy's curator insight, July 31, 2013 6:23 AM

Does this mean life size tutor holograms are coming soon? #edtech

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What comes next? Technologies That Could Change The World

What comes next? Technologies That Could Change The World | smart cities | Scoop.it
Right now is such an exciting time to be alive, as science and technology hurtles humanity forward at such incredible rates. Who would’ve thought ten years ago that we’d have one touch access to all the information in the world, on our phones!

http://tinyurl.com/czstgst


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Future of Web and Technology [Infographic]

The Future of Web and Technology [Infographic] | smart cities | Scoop.it

Infographic on The Future of Web and Technology describes on the trending products and innovations growing rapidly year by year. Augmented reality and its products being the core of advanced technologies in the future. Google glass, augmented reality based wearable gadgets, 3d printers, cloud computing, educational technology, leap motion, another AR product Oculus Rift, AR contact lenses, agent smartwatch and related gadgets, all contribute to the web and technology.


Via Lauren Moss
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Triangle Software's curator insight, July 6, 7:44 AM

With so many technology innovations being developed and implemented - what do you see as the next innovation for your industry?

Jeremy Cooke's curator insight, July 16, 7:05 AM

Another interesting area for games and generesal digital creativity.. now where did I put that Bamzooki ?

 

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A Scientist Predicts the Future

A Scientist Predicts the Future | smart cities | Scoop.it

When making predictions, I have two criteria: the laws of physics must be obeyed and prototypes must exist that demonstrate “proof of principle.” I’ve interviewed more than 300 of the world’s top scientists, and many allowed me into laboratories where they are inventing the future. Their accomplishments and dreams are eye-opening. From my conversations with them, here’s a glimpse of what to expect in the coming decades:


Via Pierre Tran
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Teresa Lima's curator insight, January 10, 4:38 AM

#Not 

I think the future is unpredictable, and no one  can predict the future!

Carlos Polaino Jiménez's curator insight, January 16, 7:38 AM

Predicción científica del futuro, esto es un tema a leer por lo menos.

Jesús Martinez's curator insight, January 18, 8:07 AM

add your insight...

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Printing the Human Body: How It Works and Where It Is Headed

Printing the Human Body: How It Works and Where It Is Headed | smart cities | Scoop.it

The rise of 3D printing has introduced one of the most ground-breaking technological feats happening right now. The most exciting part, though, doesn't have anything to do with printing electronics or fancy furniture, but in producing human tissues, otherwise known as bioprinting. While it is still in its infancy, the future of bioprinting looks very bright and will eventually result in some major advances for society, whilst also saving billions for the economy this is spent on research and development.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 27, 2013 1:55 PM

I can't see this saving money - but it will save lives. The technology to print exists. It is the question of how to develop stem cells into tissue types and then how to link these with the bodies complex control systems (nervous, circulatory and immune). in the best case scenario a grown organ will be recognised as self and the body systems will grow into them. However, organs are not toasters. Researchers are concentrating on easy things like skin grafts and ears at present, but like nano electronics, the future is full of potential and questions.

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 27, 2013 9:27 PM

Will HP buy Organovo, which invented and produces the NovoGen bioprinter?

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:46 PM

Such astonishingly wonderful ways to use the new 3D printing technology.

Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from The 21st Century
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A Map of Education Technology Through 2040 [#Infographic]

How will disruptive technology change education?

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Jeroen Bottema's curator insight, August 27, 2013 2:08 AM

"

What will education look like in the future?

Considering that 10 years ago very few students carried smartphones, andtablets didn’t even exist, it’s impossible to look 20 or 30 years into the future. It is likely, however, that cloud-based technology will be the foundation for educational technology and that remote, online learning will continue to grow at a faster pace.

Will the developing world catch up with the developed world? Will residential colleges be as popular as they are today? And what about degrees…will they still mean something to employers?"

Treathyl Fox's comment, August 27, 2013 10:09 AM
I'm not a geek or tech type. I should have kept up with the technology revolution, but I didn't. But with respect to what I did learn and derive benefits from? If it's real progress, let it run its course. Don't get in the way and don't try to stop it. "Education is priceless."
Treathyl Fox's curator insight, August 27, 2013 10:11 AM

"Education is priceless."  It's not a process that should be disrupted.  If technology is disruptive, that's just ignorant!

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The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic

The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic | smart cities | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered where you or your children may be living in 2050?
Experts predict that by then three-quarters of the world's population will live in cities. For part of its Tomorrow's Cities season the BBC takes a look through the crystal ball to imagine what city life might be like in 40 years' time.

Find more details at the interactive graphic at the link.


Via Lauren Moss
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, August 23, 2013 4:15 PM

Here's some ideas on how we might live in the future. What do you think?

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The Future Is Now: 15 Innovations in #HigherEd to Watch For

The Future Is Now: 15 Innovations in #HigherEd to Watch For | smart cities | Scoop.it
The next three years hold out the prospect of transforming the higher-education experience in positive ways.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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