smart cities
12.2K views | +0 today
Follow
smart cities
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from visual data
Scoop.it!

Google adds London to its growing list of 3D-mapped cities

Google adds London to its growing list of 3D-mapped cities | smart cities | Scoop.it

Google Maps has now added London to an impressive roster of 3D-mapped cities that also includes Paris, Rome, New York and Los Angeles. By piecing together 45-degree aerial imagery, the Google mapping team has been able to recreate entire cities.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from green streets
Scoop.it!

5 Ways Cities Are Using Big Data

5 Ways Cities Are Using Big Data | smart cities | Scoop.it
Big data's kind of a big deal. Here's how a few cities and using mass information to make their residents' lives a little easier.

 

Cities across the world, large and small, are utilizing big data sets — like traffic statistics, energy consumption rates and GPS mapping — to launch projects to help their respective communities. For example, New York recently released hundreds of high-value data sets to provide greater data collection transparency. Innovative projects are popping up nearly every day in different cities. And as more information becomes public, the potential for these increases significantly.


Visit the link for specific examples of cities utilizing big data to improve communities and leverage technology...

 



Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from green infographics
Scoop.it!

The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic

The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic | smart cities | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered where you or your children may be living in 2050?
Experts predict that by then three-quarters of the world's population will live in cities. For part of its Tomorrow's Cities season the BBC takes a look through the crystal ball to imagine what city life might be like in 40 years' time.

Find more details at the interactive graphic at the link.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, August 23, 2013 4:15 PM

Here's some ideas on how we might live in the future. What do you think?

Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from green streets
Scoop.it!

Imagining A Future City Filled With Driverless Cars And Without Any Parking Spaces

Imagining A Future City Filled With Driverless Cars And Without Any Parking Spaces | smart cities | Scoop.it

As self-driving cars move from fantasy to reality, what kind of effect will they have on cities?

A research and urban prototyping project called Shuffle City investigates, and in the process, becomes a manifesto for a new kind of modern city--one that depends less on traditional public transportation like buses or light rail and more on creating a fleet of continuously moving automated vehicles to serve urban mobility needs.

Shuffle City looks at the new possibilities that could arise from cities transitioning to cars without drivers. If cars were put into some constant flow as a public good, and if people didn’t all have their own vehicles, there would be no need for the concrete wastelands and lifeless towers that serve as a parking infrastructure in the urban landscapes of car-centric cities like Phoenix and Los Angeles (Under the current ownership model, the average car spends 21 hours per day parked.)

The share of city space ruled by parking lots will shrink, making way for more green space, environmental buffers, workspace, housing, retail, and denser planning for more walkable cities...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, August 7, 2013 8:41 AM

Um desenho da cidade de nossos sonhos. Carros sem motoristas, ruas sem espaço para estacionamento, e por aí vai.

Kim Spence-Jones's curator insight, August 8, 2013 2:53 AM

Interface between cars and homes is an interesting area of R&D. Everything from entertainment synchronising to battery management.

miguel sa's curator insight, September 4, 2013 4:17 PM

Jacque Fresco has been talking about this sort of thing for awhile now, looks like its coming closer to reality~ 

Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from green streets
Scoop.it!

Masdar City, Abu Dhabi: Zero-Waste, Carbon-Neutral & Car-Free

Masdar City, Abu Dhabi: Zero-Waste, Carbon-Neutral & Car-Free | smart cities | Scoop.it

Rising in the desert outside of Abu Dhabi, Masdar City will be the world’s most sustainable metropolis with no cars (or skyscrapers) allowed. The development is a project of the Abu Dhabi Future Energy Company and has been largely designed by Foster & Partners.

 

Solar, wind and geothermal sources will fuel the city – sun-powered desalination plants will provide fresh water for inhabitants, which will in turn be recycled. Practicing what it embodies on multiple levels, this new urban area aims to be the definitive region for developing green energy and researching clean technology.

 

The Masdar Institute of Science and Technology has already been built and more structures are on the way. By 2025, the target population should be up to 50,000 within the walkable 2.3 square-mile perimeter currently planned for development.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, July 25, 2013 2:55 PM

Interesting experiment, but starting a city from scratch has always been a challenge.  Still we may gain some insights on what to do or not do based on Masdar.

Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from green streets
Scoop.it!

Can Architects Solve Our Cities’ Pollution Problems?

Can Architects Solve Our Cities’ Pollution Problems? | smart cities | Scoop.it

As populations continue to move to urban areas, architects must address how their designs will impact the cities they are trying to improve— and those inhabitants whose access to clean air is determined by their proposals. How can architects best use design to repair the health of our cities?


Visit the article link for project links and an overview of some of the innovative ways architecture addresses climate change, air quality, emissions and is rethinking our cities through design, technology and new approaches to sustainable urbanism...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from COMPUTATIONAL THINKING and CYBERLEARNING
Scoop.it!

Riding big data wave to smart cities of the future

Riding big data wave to smart cities of the future | smart cities | Scoop.it
THE next wave of big data will create smart cities and transport services capable of offering personalised advice to commuters, an international expert says.

Via RMITComputer Science&IT, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
more...
Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from green infographics
Scoop.it!

The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic

The City of 2050: An Interactive Graphic | smart cities | Scoop.it

Have you ever wondered where you or your children may be living in 2050?
Experts predict that by then three-quarters of the world's population will live in cities. For part of its Tomorrow's Cities season the BBC takes a look through the crystal ball to imagine what city life might be like in 40 years' time.

Find more details at the interactive graphic at the link.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, August 23, 2013 4:15 PM

Here's some ideas on how we might live in the future. What do you think?

Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from green infographics
Scoop.it!

Infographic: How Our Cities Are Shaping Us

Infographic: How Our Cities Are Shaping Us | smart cities | Scoop.it

Architects and city planners are becoming more and more familiar with the health effects of our built environment.  This to-the-point infographic, designed by Chris Yoon, cites a few ways in which mid-20th century city planning trends have contributed to a growing obesity problem in the United States.  This data has alarmed scientists, planners and city officials into stressing the importance of redesigning the physical spaces so as to encourage physical activity and healthy choices.

 


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from green streets
Scoop.it!

Imagining A Future City Filled With Driverless Cars And Without Any Parking Spaces

Imagining A Future City Filled With Driverless Cars And Without Any Parking Spaces | smart cities | Scoop.it

As self-driving cars move from fantasy to reality, what kind of effect will they have on cities?

A research and urban prototyping project called Shuffle City investigates, and in the process, becomes a manifesto for a new kind of modern city--one that depends less on traditional public transportation like buses or light rail and more on creating a fleet of continuously moving automated vehicles to serve urban mobility needs.

Shuffle City looks at the new possibilities that could arise from cities transitioning to cars without drivers. If cars were put into some constant flow as a public good, and if people didn’t all have their own vehicles, there would be no need for the concrete wastelands and lifeless towers that serve as a parking infrastructure in the urban landscapes of car-centric cities like Phoenix and Los Angeles (Under the current ownership model, the average car spends 21 hours per day parked.)

The share of city space ruled by parking lots will shrink, making way for more green space, environmental buffers, workspace, housing, retail, and denser planning for more walkable cities...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
José Antônio Carlos - O Professor Pepe's curator insight, August 7, 2013 8:41 AM

Um desenho da cidade de nossos sonhos. Carros sem motoristas, ruas sem espaço para estacionamento, e por aí vai.

Kim Spence-Jones's curator insight, August 8, 2013 2:53 AM

Interface between cars and homes is an interesting area of R&D. Everything from entertainment synchronising to battery management.

miguel sa's curator insight, September 4, 2013 4:17 PM

Jacque Fresco has been talking about this sort of thing for awhile now, looks like its coming closer to reality~ 

Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from green streets
Scoop.it!

NYC's Innovative New Map System Won't Leave You Lost

NYC's Innovative New Map System Won't Leave You Lost | smart cities | Scoop.it

Even for the most direction-savvy New Yorker, emerging from the dark pit of the subway can be a disorienting experience. New York City streets are bright, they’re loud, oftentimes they’re smelly, and worst of all, maps are virtually non-existent. Or at least that used to be the case.

 

Just this week, the Department of Transportation unveiled its WalkNYC initiative, a program that will bring comprehensive pedestrian maps to all five boroughs. In a city where an estimated 30 percent of all trips are made by foot and one out of every three locals can’t tell north from south, they’re probably going to come in handy.

 

Though NYC’s public transportation is top-notch and we are technically on a grid, it’s easy to get lost or overwhelmed when traveling by foot. That’s why the DOT enlisted the help of PentaCityGroup, a consortium of urban planners, engineers, designers, cartographers and geographical information specialists, to solve the problem.

Their goal? To create an information-packed map that would orient pedestrians and help them find the gems each NYC neighborhood has to offer. The first of these new information kiosks was installed earlier this week in Chinatown (they’re already located at every Citi Bike station), and it’s expected that others will be popping up in midtown Manhattan, Long Island City in Queens and Prospect Heights in Brooklyn this summer


Via Lauren Moss
more...
luiy's curator insight, July 3, 2013 8:49 AM

If the style of these maps looks familiar, that’s because it is. The design team wanted to marry the current design to the graphic language that was was established for the subway system in the late 1960s. The typeface is still Helvetica (albeit with a slight twist–the type’s square dots are now round) and it uses the same organizational conventions (white type on a dark background). “All of this was deliberately echoing the way the subways look,” Bierut explains. “We wanted people to be able to ride the subway, come out and orient themselves.” Bierut says the design of the maps is meant to be accurate, trustworthy and friendly. But not too friendly—this is New York City, after all. “We wanted these things to be beautiful in a way, but also characteristic of the best of New York.”

ParadigmGallery's comment, July 8, 2013 4:02 PM
great...can't wait to try these...
Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from green streets
Scoop.it!

Thomas Heatherwick reveals garden bridge designed for River Thames

Thomas Heatherwick reveals garden bridge designed for River Thames | smart cities | Scoop.it
Thomas Heatherwick reveals garden bridge designed for the River Thames in London in collaboration with Joanna Lumley.


The design was developed by Heatherwick Studio after Transport for London awarded it to develop ideas for improving pedestrian links across the river.

"With its rich heritage of allotments, gardens, heathland, parks and squares, London is one of the greenest cities in the world," says Thomas Heatherwick. "In this context we are excited to have been selected by TFL to explore the opportunity of a pedestrian river crossing. The idea is simple; to connect north and south London with a garden."


Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.