smart cities
12.2K views | +0 today
Follow
smart cities
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

Geraldine Hamilton: Body parts on a chip

It's relatively easy to imagine a new medicine, a better cure for some disease. The hard part, though, is testing it, and that can delay promising new cures for years. In this well-explained talk, Geraldine Hamilton shows how her lab creates organs and body parts on a chip, simple structures with all the pieces essential to testing new medications -- even custom cures for one specific person.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:26 AM

We think this is an aweeome video, Geraldine Hamilton is totally awesome she is really geting at the heart of issues in the big pharma and healthcare field and addressing the issues intelligently, nothing but right on the lady, well worth every minute of this short video. Check it out it also has play in the semiconductor realm as well, (also why we like this too)

Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

Craig Venter: 'This isn't a fantasy look at the future. We are doing the future'

Craig Venter: 'This isn't a fantasy look at the future. We are doing the future' | smart cities | Scoop.it

The pioneering American scientist, who created the world's first synthetic life, is building a gadget that could teletransport medicine and vaccines into our homes or to colonists in space


Via Szabolcs Kósa
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Margarida Sá Costa from Tracking the Future
Scoop.it!

Turning biologists into programmers

Turning biologists into programmers | smart cities | Scoop.it

For more than half a century scientists have looked on the DNA molecule as life's blueprint. Now biological engineers are beginning to see the molecule not as a static plan, but more like a snippet of life's computer code that they can program.

Penn State researchers are unraveling the mystery of how nature codes and recodes this program to address some of the world's biggest challenges, says Howard Salis, assistant professor of biological engineering and chemical engineering.

"You can engineer DNA to reprogram the metabolism of simple organisms and you can program them to make what you want, or to make it more efficiently, says Salis. "The trick is to understand how the organism interprets its DNA, and then to optimize new DNA sequences to rationally control its behavior."


Via Szabolcs Kósa
Margarida Sá Costa's insight:

Natural Code? 

artificial inteligence and human inteligence too near? 

more...
No comment yet.