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Slovenian Genealogy Research
Ascertainment of history & heritage from Slovenia
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Family Tree: A City of Immigrants | Historic Indianapolis | All Things ...

Family Tree: A City of Immigrants | Historic Indianapolis | All Things ... | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

The earliest naturalization records in Indiana date to 1807. Throughout the years various county courts handled naturalization proceedings. Even the Indiana Supreme Court naturalized people for a time. The process required foreign born peoples to follow a two-step process. They first had to file a declaration of intent to become naturalized, then file a petition for naturalization. Once their petition was approved, they received a certificate that granted them citizenship. The entire process took several years.

Before 1906, only men were required to file for naturalization. Women were not required to file until 1922. Before this time, they either became citizens automatically when their husbands were naturalized or by marrying a U.S. citizen. Likewise, children were automatically granted citizenship along with their fathers.

Slovenian Girls. Second-generation Slovenian girls in traditional costumes, via the Indiana Historical Society. Before 1906, only men were required to file for naturalization. Women were not required to file until 1922.
Knapco's insight:

With regard to the picture of Slovenian girls: I am afraid they are not in a very traditional dresses. National costumes look differently. Slovenia was at that time in Austria-Hungarian monarchy (until 1918) but traditional dressing code for that time in Slovenia differed by regions and was different in towns and countryside.
Also for a comment I doubt that it is relevant for Slovenian culture: in Slovenia you will not find any orthodox church. Slovenia is mainly with the Roman Catholic Church, only in its part neighboring Hungary is a minority with Evangelical Lutheran Church.
Is it possible that ‘Slovenian’ is confused for ‘Slavic’?

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Woman's Glory, Slovenian Kitchen

Woman's Glory, Slovenian Kitchen | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

For those with Slovenian ancestry, the Slovenian Union of America website does have a page of genealogy links. The downside to this cookbook is that not all recipes are attributed. However, there are plenty of names in this book...

Woman's Glory - The Kitchen by the Slovenian Women's Union of America is 275 pages of everything from introductions, recipes, and kitchen tips to photos, some street addresses and information about the Slovenian Women's Union. This cookbook published in 1953 is in honor of the organization's silver anniversary. From the Preface by the cookbook's editor Albina Novak, the reader learns that she had wanted to compile a cookbook that "would serve as an instructor to the Slovenian women of today who wish to include in their homemaking dishes for which their mothers have always been famous." Four pages in the beginning of the book provide information and names about members of the Slovenian Women's Union

 

 

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WorldVitalRecords Newsletter 2012

WorldVitalRecords Newsletter 2012 | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

MyHeritage & WorldVitalRecords have made an important improvement built in Family Tree Builder 6.0 with offered matching of the family tree members to records from different sources, gathered trough WorldVitalRecords. Indirect access to more than 3,600,000,000 names in birth, marriage, death and vital records enriches a chance to find your ancestors.

 

WorldVitalRecords interface enables searching trough a newspaper collection with more than 1 billion articles from 1739 to the present, large historical map collection with 2 million maps and 200 million names of landowners, a yearbook collection, which includes more than 8,000 high school, college, and military yearbooks, and the world's largest index of tombstone inscriptions and tombstone photographs with more than 30 million photos.

 

In order to explore how search engines work for your family history research your family tree has to be published on the Internet, in a family site MyHeritage.com (could be made private).

 

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FamilySearch Rootstech 2012 videos on You Tube

FamilySearch Rootstech 2012 videos on You Tube | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

The Rootstech conference is likeley the most important conference to attend and discover emerging technologies and devices to improve your genealogy research, said the organisers: FamilySearch and Ancestry.com. Many presentations of new developments were seen at the conference.

 

Ancestry.com announced also that they will start offering an autosomal DNA testing in 2012 (Autosomal biogeograpical markers - BGA). As of December 2011, Ancestry.com has more than 1.7 million paying subscribers around the world and is home to more than 8 billion historical records and millions of family trees. It’s not hard to imagine that whey will make a huge splash this year when they offer autosomal testing at Ancestry.com DNA, commented SpittalStreet.com.

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RootsTech 2012: MyHeritage is on its way!

RootsTech 2012: MyHeritage is on its way! | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

MyHeritage: While genealogy conferences bring together genealogists for learning, sharing, collaborating, RootsTech - February 2-4, in Salt Lake City, Utah - brings together technology developers and genealogy consumers.

Day 1 and Day 2 highlights at RootsTech by MyHeritage and World Vital Records, who can help advance a family research.

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An Interwiev for the Linden Tree Magazin

There are many interesting stories in genealogy magazins. Here is an opportunity offered to publish yours in the Linden Tree.

Rose Marie Macek Jisa, the President of Slovenian Genealogy Society International, Inc. has recently sent to her Slovenian colleague Peter Hawlina the following sample questions to answer about one's search for family in America.

1. How and when did you learn you had family in America? Any interesting stories passed down from generation to generation?

2. What information did you have that tied them to your family?

3. What steps did you take to get in touch with them, i.e., did you write letters? did you make phone calls? did you contact them using the internet? If yes, how did you find their addresses?

4. What success have you had in finding your family?

5. How were they able to help you? What kind of information were they able to share with you, i.e., have they share photos with you . . . .

7. Have you shared your family tree with them?

8. Have you been able to develop an on-going relationship with them?

9. Do you plan to travel to America to meet them or are they planning to come to Slovenia to meet you?

We’d like to add a short paragraph about who you are, i.e., where you live in Slovenia, when you became interested in genealogy, etc.

 

Please add anything else you feel would add to your story. If you do not know the English language, write it in Slovenian and I will have it translated to English. Better still, if you do know English but feel hesitant about writing it, please write it anyhow – we will be happy to edit it. Before publishing your article in our Linden Tree publication, I will email a copy to you for your approval. If possible, it would be nice to have a copy of a page of your family tree and/or a photo of you to accompany your article.

Thank you so much!

Rose Marie Macek Jisa

President, Slovenian Genealogy Society International, Inc.

http://www.sloveniangenealogy.org/files/SGSLinden2008Apr.pdf

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40,000 case files on immigrants newly opened by National Archives at San Francisco

40,000 case files on immigrants newly opened by National Archives at San Francisco | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it
The National Archives at San Francisco officially opened 40,000 case files on immigrants to the United States on May 22, 2012. The research room was dedicated to U.S.
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Save the US Social Security Death Index: Why and how to help

Save the US Social Security Death Index: Why and how to help | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

MyHeritage Blog: Stop ID Theft NOW! Sign a petition by 8th of March.

 

The SSDI is accessed by many companies, non-profits and other entities, in addition to family history researchers. Forensic specialists use it when reuniting remains of military veterans with next-of-kin and descendants. Law offices, banks and insurance companies use it to resolve probate cases and to locate heirs. All these entities would have to spend more money and time accessing other information resources when the SSDI has served this purpose for more than 10 years.

 

The House Ways and Means Committee Subcommittee on Social Security is proposing to completely shut down use of the SSDI by genealogists as well as other industries such as banking and insurance that rely upon its information. Such an attempt is short-sighted and runs counter to the original purpose of the SSDI: to actually combat fraud.

 

The Records Preservation & Access Committee (RPAC) is a joint coalition of international genealogical societies representing millions of genealogists and family historians, and just announced the launch of its Stop ID Theft NOW! campaign with its We The People petition posted at WhiteHouse.gov. Here’s the petition. To sign the petition, read the instructions.

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CGSSD Meeting on Saturday, 21 January

CGSSD Meeting on Saturday, 21 January | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Features Denise Spurlock; The Computer Genealogy Society of San Diego meets on the 3rd Saturday of each month (except December) from 9:00 a.m. to noon on the campus of UCSD, University of California, San Diego.

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Research Your Particular Genealogy and family history Uncover Your Forefathers and Build Your Household Shrub

Research Your Particular Genealogy and family history Uncover Your Forefathers and Build Your Household Shrub | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

SlovenskaPalma; American – Slovenian Club.

Baraga History · Bodyguard · klekanje · membership · Slovenia.

Bishop Frederic Baraga history. Bishop Frederic Baraga was a great missionary figure of the American Church who was born in Slovenia on June 29, 1797 (Baraga Bulletin, 2011).

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