Slovenian Genealogy Research
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Slovenian Genealogy Research
Ascertainment of history & heritage from Slovenia
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Phylogenetic network of the FIFA World Cup

Phylogenetic network of the FIFA World Cup | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

The FIFA competition has been played every 4 years since 1930, except 1942 and 1946. Morrison et al. have analised how the number of teams competing has changed dramatically over the years (13-204), as has the number of teams accepted into the finals (13-32). They prepared some extraordinary graphics showing interesting results.

 

There have been several attempts to provide visualizations of the relative success of the different national teams at the FIFA World Cup competitions (Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) World Cup™). This is quite a complex task, because there have been 19 competitions so far, and at least 74 teams have competed in the finals at least once. The relationships between these teams represent a network within each competition, based on their relative success at the games they play, and this network changes through time across the various competitions. Here, I review some of the previous network analyses, and then I present a combined analysis of all of the competitions based on a phylogenetic network

 

Given the 80 years over which the competitions have been held, there have been some changes in the political entities that the teams represent. Confusion over this issue affects some of the graphs shown below. For example, FIFA officially attributes the various results as follows:
(i) all West Germany results go to Germany (leaving 1 finals result for East Germany);
(ii) all Yugoslavia and Serbia & Montenegro results are attributed to Serbia (since the break-up, both Croatia and Slovenia have reached the finals independently)... 

 

By D Morrison, L van Iersel, S Kelk, M Charleton

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An Interwiev for the Linden Tree Magazin

There are many interesting stories in genealogy magazins. Here is an opportunity offered to publish yours in the Linden Tree.

Rose Marie Macek Jisa, the President of Slovenian Genealogy Society International, Inc. has recently sent to her Slovenian colleague Peter Hawlina the following sample questions to answer about one's search for family in America.

1. How and when did you learn you had family in America? Any interesting stories passed down from generation to generation?

2. What information did you have that tied them to your family?

3. What steps did you take to get in touch with them, i.e., did you write letters? did you make phone calls? did you contact them using the internet? If yes, how did you find their addresses?

4. What success have you had in finding your family?

5. How were they able to help you? What kind of information were they able to share with you, i.e., have they share photos with you . . . .

7. Have you shared your family tree with them?

8. Have you been able to develop an on-going relationship with them?

9. Do you plan to travel to America to meet them or are they planning to come to Slovenia to meet you?

We’d like to add a short paragraph about who you are, i.e., where you live in Slovenia, when you became interested in genealogy, etc.

 

Please add anything else you feel would add to your story. If you do not know the English language, write it in Slovenian and I will have it translated to English. Better still, if you do know English but feel hesitant about writing it, please write it anyhow – we will be happy to edit it. Before publishing your article in our Linden Tree publication, I will email a copy to you for your approval. If possible, it would be nice to have a copy of a page of your family tree and/or a photo of you to accompany your article.

Thank you so much!

Rose Marie Macek Jisa

President, Slovenian Genealogy Society International, Inc.

http://www.sloveniangenealogy.org/files/SGSLinden2008Apr.pdf

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40,000 case files on immigrants newly opened by National Archives at San Francisco

40,000 case files on immigrants newly opened by National Archives at San Francisco | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it
The National Archives at San Francisco officially opened 40,000 case files on immigrants to the United States on May 22, 2012. The research room was dedicated to U.S.
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Heartfelt Thanks to Slovenian Genealogical Society

Heartfelt Thanks to Slovenian Genealogical Society | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Peter Hawlina, the president of Slovenian Genealogy Society, has recently received thankful letter from Matt Perry (USA), who found his ancestors in an online database of marriages and index of birth records for Semič in Slovenia.

 

Mr. Hawlina,

Without ever knowing me, you have helped me learn more about a branch of my family in a matter of minutes then I had been able to learn in the past 20 years. I cannot thank you enough for doing such great, and helpful work, by posting some of these Slovenian records files online!

My name is Matt Perry, I live in California USA, and my great-grandfather Josef Kambič and his twin brother "Matt" (who I was named for) were born in Slovenia about 1870. These brothers came to America in the 1880s. The only thing we knew about Josef and Matt's family was that their parents were named Stefan Kambič and Ana Maurin, and that, on one document at least, Josef had said his birthplace was "Mottling." We had given up getting any further with this family, until I accidentally found an amazing file online, at your website, of transcribed birth records from Semič area! To my surprise, in this list I found the following entry:Father-Stefan Kambic---Mother-Anna MovernFr Line Day Mo Yr Child Village House No.039 04d 10-10 Mai 1858 Stefan +30.9.1918 Praproce 3078 09d 4-4 Feb 1862 Maria Praproce 3122 top 15-16 Nov 1864 Anna Praproce 3199 02d 3-3 Apr 1869 Mathias & Josef Praproce 3291 09d 7-8 Aug 1875 Agnes Praproce 3
Here was the right family, and even the twins Mat and Josef! Finally, I had proof of the names of their parents, as well as the name of the village they lived in! Then, a second amazing thing happened: I found next the even larger and more amazing file of Semič area marriages, and this allowed me to follow my family back into the early 1700s, by simply working backwards through this list!

 *****

Anyway, my apologies for sending you this miserably long message. Surely I do need to do much more research on these people, but your text files have given me a real hope that Slovenian records will answer all of my questions! I did want to tell you how much I really have appreciated those text files you have put up online, and that if I am ever in Slovenia, or if you are ever in California, or if we ever meet somewhere in the middle, I will need to buy you several rounds of drinks to show my appreciation! Thanks much!!

Cheers!

Matt Perry (great grandson of Josef Kambič of Praproče, and Ana Šuklje of Metlika)

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SLOVENIAN ROOTS QUEST: Portrait of a Family in Transition: The ...

SLOVENIAN ROOTS QUEST: Portrait of a Family in Transition: The ... | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

SLOVENIAN ROOTS QUEST. Tangled roots, family secrets, a famous immigrant writer who died under mysterious circumstances. Accordions, polkas, and potica. And now a new twist: Josephine and Jožefa, or My Year of Cooking.

 

I can't deny it: I'm a late-in-life, born again Slovenka. It is surprising that it took so long, since I grew up in and around Cleveland, which boasts the world's second largest Slovenian population. But aside from our yearly potica-making ritual, my mother never talked much about her ethnic roots, either in America or in the tiny, beautiful Alpine land of Slovenia, once part of Yugoslavia. Her parents were named Kozlevcar and Adamic. My grandmother was a cousin of Louis Adamic, the famous leftist writer from the 1930's and 1940's

 

 

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Blair K's comment, August 3, 2012 9:50 PM
Thank you for posting this entry from my Slovenian Roots Quest website (www.slovenianroots.blogspot.com.) Lately, I have turned to cooking from vintage Slovenian American cookbooks as one more way of exploring my roots.
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World War II Cadet Nursing Corps Card Files, 1942-1948 online at Ancestry.com

World War II Cadet Nursing Corps Card Files, 1942-1948 online at Ancestry.com | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Ancestry.com has released a database containing membership cards with details on women who joined the Cadet Nurse Corps created during WWII as follows: “Historical Background After the United States entered World War II, the military’s needs brought on a nursing shortage. To address the need, federal funding, administered by the Public Health Service, began flowing to nursing schools in 1942, and in 1943 Congress authorized the Cadet Nurse Corps. The Corps offered scholarships for tuition and fees, stipends, and uniforms to women ages 17–35 who went to nursing school and committed to serve in the nursing profession for the duration of the war. The Corps did not discriminate on race and graduated almost 125,000 nurses....

This database contains Cadet Nurse Corps membership cards providing details on women who joined the Corps. There are four different card forms: 300A, 300B (pre-May 1944), 300B revised, and PG 400, which recorded post-graduate information. NARA provides the following description of the forms.

 

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Resistance Day, Slovenia – April 27

Resistance Day, Slovenia – April 27 | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Slovenia’s Day of Uprising: Traditions, Customs and Activities

 by @ACelebrationofW

 

The Day of Uprising or Resistance Day (Slovenia, dan upora proti okupatorju) is a holiday in Slovenia to commemorate the establishment of Slovenia’s Liberation Front, which spearheaded the home-grown resistance against Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy.

The Slovenian monument features three beams pointing to the heavens, painted in the colours of the Slovenian flag. They angle as a reminder of an old proverb that states: “We bend but never break.” The three pyramids represent Mount Triglav, the tallest mountain in Slovenia. Triglav is also the name of the monument itself, designed by Mr. Miro Korsik of Toronto.

During the holiday, events such as public speeches from surviving Slovenian guerillas and political groups gather at the Monument of Freedom, created by Jakob Savinek (1922-1961) to commemorate this momentous event which liberated the country from foreign rule during World War II.

 

Celebration of freedom 

 

In Slovenia, The Liberation Front was established in Ljubljana on 26 April 1941 in the house of writer and literary critic Josip Vidmar, only two weeks after Slovenia was occupied by Nazi Germany and ten days after the Yugoslav authorities surrendered in Belgrade.

The National Resistance Day is a celebration of the fundamental values of freedom, courage, ingenuity and culture.The Second World War forced the Slovenian nation to take many important decisions. The decision to resist the occupation required a clearly defined position on the existence of the nation and a complete break with the past.

 

Brief history

 

On 27 April 1941 an anti-imperialist front was founded in Ljubljana. Immediately upon its founding, the Liberation Front launched a campaign to attract followers, and urged all Slovenians to rise against the enemy when the Soviet Union was attacked by the Third Reich on 22 June 1941. The front soon became popular among Slovenians and represented a solid basis for a partisan resistance movement named the National Liberation Struggle.

The founding meeting of the Liberation Front was attended by a number of people on behalf of four main founding groups, namely the Communist Party of Slovenia, the Sokoli - a gymnastic society with patriotic aspirations based on a similar Czech movement, the Christian Socialists and a group of Slovenian intellectuals. The front was active in the entire territory populated by Slovenians, including where the Slovenian ethnic minority lives in Italy, Austria and Hungary.

Its platform set down that a movement against the occupying forces had to begin at once. One of the front's aims was also to bring about unity of all five nations in the then Yugoslavia. Moreover, the platform said that after the country was liberated, the front would take power in Slovenia and introduce people's democracy. Soon after being set up, the front became dominated by the Communist Party, which also "took over" the leadership of the partisan national liberation movement. All class or political opponents were denied participation in it and were labelled "enemies of the people".

Following pressure exerted by the Communist Party, three founding groups of the front - the party, the Sokoli and the Christian Socialists - adopted a joint statement in February 1943 reiterating the unity of the Liberation Front. The statement - which has become known as the Dolomiti Declaration - in fact gave the Communist Party the leading role, while the other groups renounced their independent political activity.

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Medieval Fair in Ljubljana, 20 May

Medieval Fair in Ljubljana, 20 May | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

One of the most popular Slovenia's Medieval Festivals.

 

The forthcoming Medieval Fair (20 May 2012), conceived as an open-air living history event, will try to evoke an authentic medieval atmosphere in the midst of Ljubljana Old Town. Stalls at the fair will be selling medieval objects, food and drinks.

The fair will be accompanied by demonstrations of medieval handicraft techniques and nowadays unusual practices such as bloodletting using leeches, medieval dentistry, torture, etc. Accompanying events will also include creative workshops offering visitors an opportunity to try their hand at various handicrafts, and a theatre show featuring medieval buffoons.

The Official Travel Guide by Slovenian Tourist Board

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Zbogom orožje - dobrodošli spomini | Goodbye to Weapon - Welcome Memories

Zbogom orožje - dobrodošli spomini | Goodbye to Weapon - Welcome Memories | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Rodoslovje (Genealogy). One of the new opportunities brought by new technologies is digitalization. More and more of life becomes digital and virtual. That is happening also to the past. Genealogists bring back memories of their ancestors and relatives. Genealogical work can be regarded also as a kind of transfer of archival material to modern media. In doing this voluntary genealogical work is complementary to official projects of archives, libraries and other entities.

 

Europeana is one of those. Europeana enables people to explore the digital resources of Europe's museums, libraries, archives and audio-visual collections. It promotes discovery and networking opportunities in a multilingual space where users can engage, share in and be inspired by the rich diversity of Europe's cultural and scientific heritage.

 

Genealogy societies are invited to participate in its project dedicated to the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War: Europeana 1914-1918: Remembering the First World War – a digital collection of outstanding sources from European national libraries (http://www.europeana-collections-1914-1918.eu/del/D4_1_Awareness_and_Dissemination_Plan.pdf).

 

Europeana is organizing some working days also in Slovenia to digitalize photos, postcards, diaries and other documents kept in private archives. Slovenian Genealogy Society and its president Peter Hawlina are actively participating in these activities. Private collections could be scanned or photographed in Nova Gorica (Library of France Bevk, 28 March 2012) in Maribor (War museum, 19 April 2012) or in Celje (main library, 23 May 2012).

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Timeline of ancient Greece

Timeline of ancient Greece | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

‎Archaic Greece: The timeline of Ancient Greece from 800 BC to 146 BC has been just updated in Wikipedia.

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Khai Tran's curator insight, February 24, 2014 3:41 PM

The timeline of ancient Greece and everyday life

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Australia: 13th Australasian Congress on Genealogy and Heraldry

Australia: 13th Australasian Congress on Genealogy and Heraldry | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

MyHeritage’s chief genealogist Daniel Horowitz will visit Australia this month to speak at the 13th Australasian Congress on Genealogy and Heraldry in Adelaide.


Always busy, this trip follows his recent participation at Who Do You Think You Are Live! in London. With more than 20 years of genealogy experience, Daniel provides key contributions in product development, customer support and public relations; working with genealogy societies, bloggers and media; as well as speaking and attending conferences around the world. He also heads MyHeritage’s translation department, where he has been instrumental in increasing MyHeritage’s global support for 38 languages (Slovenian included!) for MyHeritage website and software Family Tree Builder.

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7th international Avsenik music workshop

7th international Avsenik music workshop | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Attending the workshop in August 2012 (Begunje na Gorenjskem, Slovenia) will help you to improve your current knowledge of all the instruments in the Avsenik ensemble and vocals (popular folk music by Avsenik ensemble 1953 - 1990). Experienced mentors will help you to learn the technique and style of Avsenik’s performing. Application deadline is 15th July 2012.

 

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Anniversary of 1953 discovery of double-helix structure of DNA

Anniversary of 1953 discovery of double-helix structure of DNA | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

The use of DNA in genealogy has advanced to a point where great strides have been made in the use of autosomal DNA to determine relationships across family lines.

 

SpittalStreet.com remembered the important anniversary: On February 28, 1953, two scientists at Cambridge University, England,  James Watson and Frances Crick, announced that they had discovered the double-helix structure of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)—the molecule containing the human, animal, plants and other  organisms' genes.

 

At this occasion we would like to mention prof. dr. Karl Maramorosch, who has been using molecular knowledge about DNA since the same period. He witnessed and documented the great discovery of DNA and the research work o James D. Watson (see http://www.worldscibooks.com/etextbook/6505/6505_intro.pdf). 

 

At the age of 97, this renowned virologist from the United States (US) still carries out his research work (born January 16, 1915, in Vienna, Austria) guiding his juniors in virology, entomology and plant pathology. In personal communication we have recently discovered that his roots are also in Slovenia. He believes that his maternal grandfather, Dragutin Schlesinger, was born in Slovenia. As he still keeps his school certificate when he was 14 years old and lived in a small town in Slovenia. The surname Schlesinger (Šlezinger) is still represented in Savinja valley in Slovenia.

 

In 1934, after finishing his high school, Karl Maramorosch applied, and was accepted, to the Medical Faculty in Ljubliana. He did not go there, because only the first 2 years were given in Ljubliana (Slovenia), followed by the remaining years in Zagreb (Croatia), and he was afraid that he will have difficulties adjusting to two related, but slightly different, languages at the two places. He finished his studies in Poland and Romania and then left for USA. In his early life, Maramorosch wished to become a pianist and underwent training till the age of 19. Ending up as a scientist, he still plays it and participates in public performances as well. He even said that his research was needed to be carried out further as it could help the humanity, animals and plants from causing injuries to each other by spreading diseases to each other!

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John Kuzmich, Jr. Genealogy Blog: Kuzmich Pedigree Chart!

John Kuzmich, Jr. Genealogy Blog: Kuzmich Pedigree Chart! | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

John Kuzmich Jr. Genealogy Blog; John has presented his family chart and some genealogy facts as: "Eastern European Roots ... Slovenska družinska zgodovina v slovenskem jeziku - Slovenian Family History in the Slovenian Language · Семейная история. Украина. Лемко - Ukrainian ..."

 

Interesting blog about events where John (computer music technology, jazz education, web development and videoconferencing), his wife, Roslyn, (general music specialist with a unique, special curriculum on harmonica and class guitar) and his daughter, Reva, (analog electric/MIDI strings) play major roles. In the genealogy part of the blog he gives opprotunities for contacts and searches in his Gedcom file for possible relatives. John lives in Denver, Colorado, while his maternal roots are from Novo mesto, Slovenia.

 

 

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Woman's Glory, Slovenian Kitchen

Woman's Glory, Slovenian Kitchen | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

For those with Slovenian ancestry, the Slovenian Union of America website does have a page of genealogy links. The downside to this cookbook is that not all recipes are attributed. However, there are plenty of names in this book...

Woman's Glory - The Kitchen by the Slovenian Women's Union of America is 275 pages of everything from introductions, recipes, and kitchen tips to photos, some street addresses and information about the Slovenian Women's Union. This cookbook published in 1953 is in honor of the organization's silver anniversary. From the Preface by the cookbook's editor Albina Novak, the reader learns that she had wanted to compile a cookbook that "would serve as an instructor to the Slovenian women of today who wish to include in their homemaking dishes for which their mothers have always been famous." Four pages in the beginning of the book provide information and names about members of the Slovenian Women's Union

 

 

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Adobe Photoshop Genealogy I Brush Set

Adobe Photoshop Genealogy I Brush Set | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Adobe Photoshop Genealogy I Brush Set Pt. 1. Download. Adobe Photoshop Genealogy I Brush Set Pt. 2. Download.

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Webinar: Family history research made easier

Webinar: Family history research made easier | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

MyHeritage blog. Following the success of How to find your relatives in the 1940 US Census, we invite you to register for our next webinar: "Family Tree Builder: Tips and tricks to make family history research easier." The webinar will take place on Thursday, May 17 at 2pm EDT*.

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Ancestry.com launches new affordable DNA test analyzing over 700,000 marker locations

The old saying look before you leap applies to all information posted on the web and this even applies to the latest offering from the world’s most popular genealogy site.
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9 May ‘Ministers Treasures’

9 May ‘Ministers Treasures’ | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Professional knowledge-sharing platform...

On the evening of the 9th May 2012, the European Commission and Europeana are organising together with the Danish Presidency an event for Ministers from the Education, Youth and Culture (EYC) Council, senior leaders of European memory organisations and leading figures in the creative industries to raise awareness of Europeana among citizens and to demonstrate that online cultural heritage is a driver for growth.

For more information about the 'Minister's Treasure', click on a flag to download a zip file which includes the blog entry, a portrait of the minister and the ‘Minister's Treasure' from your country.

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Fest of olive oil and chard

Fest of olive oil and chard | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Padna is one of the most picturesque Istrian villages in the hinterland of Piran. It is surrounded by olive plantations, where some trees are more than 300 years old. Welcome...

 

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How to Index the 1940 United States Census

Learn about the 1940 U.S.census and how you can help make the approximate 132 Million names contained in it sharable and searchable online for free to everybody...

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Family Search adds millions of new records for 14 countries

Family Search adds millions of new records for 14 countries | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

FamilySearch.org has added 31 million new records this past week for the following countries: Argentina, Canada, Columbia, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, Hungary, Italy, Micronesia, New Zealand, Philippines, Portugal, Russia.

 

Additionally 24 million California birth records were added from 1905 to 1995.
As a reminder these records can all be searched for free thanks to thousands of volunteers from around the world.

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Idrija - on the Mercury Route

Idrija - on the Mercury Route | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

The technical heritage of Idrija, formed above the Idrija Mercury Mine and developed together with it over the centuries, will be presented to you on the tour of the main technical monuments, all recently renovated, which bear witness to the magnificence of our oldest mining town.

 

In Idrija, a special type of house of Slovenia was formed in the past – the Idrija miner's house. This residential building, nowadays a museum, was built in the second half of the 18th century. In 1910, 18 people lived in it. In this renovated miner's house, arranged as a museum, you will get to know numerous stories about the lives of the Idrija miner and his family.

 

In the Idrija Municipal Museum at the Castle Gewerkenegg two exhibitions are hosted: ‘Five Centuries of the Idrija mine and town' and ‘Idrija Lace – a History Written in Thread’. Here, you will be able to connect everything you have seen and heard during the day in one place.

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Artida - Discover Slovenia

Artida - Discover Slovenia | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Artida are cute characters from Slovenia

 

Discover Slovenia is an interactive animation for travellers visiting Slovenia. Discover Slovenia!

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Slovenian Genealogist at Work

Slovenian Genealogist at Work | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Slovenian Genealogy Society (Slovensko rodoslovno društvo - SRD) is composed of volunteers, who are willing to share their knowledge and research results either online or off-line, organize lectures or seminars, and record preservation or transcription projects. Young researcher can learn from those more experienced via web site, forum and regular events about recent developments, genealogical sources and archive records. In Slovenia, these are civil and ecclesiastical registers (birth, death and matrimonial records). Personal civil records cover mainly a period of last 100 years.

 

Church registers were started in the 17th century, only exceptionally in the 16th century. These are registers of births, marriages and deaths, which were obligatory recorded by the parish priests. Records in civil and church registers are official - primary genealogical sources. There are many other useful secondary sources, which can help in genealogy research, as archival guides. Archives of the Republic of Slovenia and Ljubljana Historical Archives have published them online. Archiepiscopal Archives of Maribor and Ljubljana have issued guides several times; recent ones are available in their reading rooms, but they are not online. For the entire country the Guide to the church registers for the ​​SR Slovenia (1972) is the most appropriate, following by Guide to the parish archives in Slovenia.

 

Among available genealogy software programs the SRD recommends these, which are compatible and enable an export of a standardized GEDCOM file with information about persons and their relationships. In that format data can be shared with other genealogists, added to online databases, or converted into family web sites. In Slovenia, Brother's Keeper is still the most used genealogy software. Its advantage over others is in the translation into the Slovenian language and support for special characters of the alphabet. Many other programs do not have these preliminary conditions. One of the most recent software programs that also meets these requirements is My Heritage Family Tree Builder. It enables also social networking service – creating family websites, where genealogists can share data and build their family trees online. Members can upload their family trees and contact other family historians to fill in gaps in their research.

 

The Slovenian genealogy site provides many other helpful links. Interesting open source software is Gramps, which tends to serve both, non-professional and professional genealogists. It can be downloaded from SourceForge page.

 

Among the SRD’s reference files an index of electronically recorded persons is popular. Worth mentioning is the list of settlements and other toponyms, which is more helpful than would be concluded by title. It is worth knowing and considering the association’s recommendations for genealogy work.

 

Some active genealogists have made signposts to many genealogical sources from their websites. For example, Mr. Fonda and Mr. Zavodnik. The most complete global genealogical signpost is certainly www.cyndislist.com.

 

Among national sources we have to mention SiStory portal (preparing to digitize The trees), dLib portal, where among many others a Lexicon of Drava Province is published (http://www.zape.si/srd/pdf/ldb.pdf), and Kamra portal (Digitized cultural heritage of Slovenian regions).

 

Search for people abroad is available through worldwide repository of genealogical information such as Ancestry and the FamilySearch site (some of the content is available only via subscription). The most popular sites for Slovenian genealogists in Europe are probably French Geneanet and the site of German association.

 

In support of search for ancestors through the World Wide Web, and permanent storage of personal data that are specific to genealogy, are increasingly included in Google search and G+ or Facebook timeline. Therefore, the prospect of many startling novelties in near future maybe could not avoid discussion on data security and data protection rights.

Source: SRD website

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