Slovenian Genealogy Research
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Slovenian Genealogy Research
Ascertainment of history & heritage from Slovenia
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MyHeritage mobile app version 2.0 released today!

MyHeritage mobile app version 2.0 released today! | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it
We're delighted to announce the release of MyHeritage app version 2.0, our free mobile application, packed with exciting new features. Now you can build and edit your family tree, add more information to it, and take your heritage with you anywhere...
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Ancestry.com docs, translated by robots?

Ancestry.com docs, translated by robots? | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Narrative Science technology is one way Ancestry.com could double users and make family history mainstream. Ancestry CEO Tim Sullivan said Narrative Science’s computers could help read the 3 million records found on the genealogy site each day—especially those hard to read—and then translate the contents into individual stories about a person’s family.


Via Kathy Szczesny
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40,000 case files on immigrants newly opened by National Archives at San Francisco

40,000 case files on immigrants newly opened by National Archives at San Francisco | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it
The National Archives at San Francisco officially opened 40,000 case files on immigrants to the United States on May 22, 2012. The research room was dedicated to U.S.
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Heartfelt Thanks to Slovenian Genealogical Society

Heartfelt Thanks to Slovenian Genealogical Society | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Peter Hawlina, the president of Slovenian Genealogy Society, has recently received thankful letter from Matt Perry (USA), who found his ancestors in an online database of marriages and index of birth records for Semič in Slovenia.

 

Mr. Hawlina,

Without ever knowing me, you have helped me learn more about a branch of my family in a matter of minutes then I had been able to learn in the past 20 years. I cannot thank you enough for doing such great, and helpful work, by posting some of these Slovenian records files online!

My name is Matt Perry, I live in California USA, and my great-grandfather Josef Kambič and his twin brother "Matt" (who I was named for) were born in Slovenia about 1870. These brothers came to America in the 1880s. The only thing we knew about Josef and Matt's family was that their parents were named Stefan Kambič and Ana Maurin, and that, on one document at least, Josef had said his birthplace was "Mottling." We had given up getting any further with this family, until I accidentally found an amazing file online, at your website, of transcribed birth records from Semič area! To my surprise, in this list I found the following entry:Father-Stefan Kambic---Mother-Anna MovernFr Line Day Mo Yr Child Village House No.039 04d 10-10 Mai 1858 Stefan +30.9.1918 Praproce 3078 09d 4-4 Feb 1862 Maria Praproce 3122 top 15-16 Nov 1864 Anna Praproce 3199 02d 3-3 Apr 1869 Mathias & Josef Praproce 3291 09d 7-8 Aug 1875 Agnes Praproce 3
Here was the right family, and even the twins Mat and Josef! Finally, I had proof of the names of their parents, as well as the name of the village they lived in! Then, a second amazing thing happened: I found next the even larger and more amazing file of Semič area marriages, and this allowed me to follow my family back into the early 1700s, by simply working backwards through this list!

 *****

Anyway, my apologies for sending you this miserably long message. Surely I do need to do much more research on these people, but your text files have given me a real hope that Slovenian records will answer all of my questions! I did want to tell you how much I really have appreciated those text files you have put up online, and that if I am ever in Slovenia, or if you are ever in California, or if we ever meet somewhere in the middle, I will need to buy you several rounds of drinks to show my appreciation! Thanks much!!

Cheers!

Matt Perry (great grandson of Josef Kambič of Praproče, and Ana Šuklje of Metlika)

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How to Index the 1940 United States Census

Learn about the 1940 U.S.census and how you can help make the approximate 132 Million names contained in it sharable and searchable online for free to everybody...

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Anniversary of 1953 discovery of double-helix structure of DNA

Anniversary of 1953 discovery of double-helix structure of DNA | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

The use of DNA in genealogy has advanced to a point where great strides have been made in the use of autosomal DNA to determine relationships across family lines.

 

SpittalStreet.com remembered the important anniversary: On February 28, 1953, two scientists at Cambridge University, England,  James Watson and Frances Crick, announced that they had discovered the double-helix structure of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)—the molecule containing the human, animal, plants and other  organisms' genes.

 

At this occasion we would like to mention prof. dr. Karl Maramorosch, who has been using molecular knowledge about DNA since the same period. He witnessed and documented the great discovery of DNA and the research work o James D. Watson (see http://www.worldscibooks.com/etextbook/6505/6505_intro.pdf). 

 

At the age of 97, this renowned virologist from the United States (US) still carries out his research work (born January 16, 1915, in Vienna, Austria) guiding his juniors in virology, entomology and plant pathology. In personal communication we have recently discovered that his roots are also in Slovenia. He believes that his maternal grandfather, Dragutin Schlesinger, was born in Slovenia. As he still keeps his school certificate when he was 14 years old and lived in a small town in Slovenia. The surname Schlesinger (Šlezinger) is still represented in Savinja valley in Slovenia.

 

In 1934, after finishing his high school, Karl Maramorosch applied, and was accepted, to the Medical Faculty in Ljubliana. He did not go there, because only the first 2 years were given in Ljubliana (Slovenia), followed by the remaining years in Zagreb (Croatia), and he was afraid that he will have difficulties adjusting to two related, but slightly different, languages at the two places. He finished his studies in Poland and Romania and then left for USA. In his early life, Maramorosch wished to become a pianist and underwent training till the age of 19. Ending up as a scientist, he still plays it and participates in public performances as well. He even said that his research was needed to be carried out further as it could help the humanity, animals and plants from causing injuries to each other by spreading diseases to each other!

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World Memory Project contributors key one million records

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum encourages you to join the World Memory Project today.

 

The World Memory Project has keyed more than one million records. All the records contain important information on individual victims of the Holocaust and Nazi persecution from children in Germany to Jewish victims at camps in Poland, the Czech Republic and Ukraine.

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Save the US Social Security Death Index: Why and how to help

Save the US Social Security Death Index: Why and how to help | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

MyHeritage Blog: Stop ID Theft NOW! Sign a petition by 8th of March.

 

The SSDI is accessed by many companies, non-profits and other entities, in addition to family history researchers. Forensic specialists use it when reuniting remains of military veterans with next-of-kin and descendants. Law offices, banks and insurance companies use it to resolve probate cases and to locate heirs. All these entities would have to spend more money and time accessing other information resources when the SSDI has served this purpose for more than 10 years.

 

The House Ways and Means Committee Subcommittee on Social Security is proposing to completely shut down use of the SSDI by genealogists as well as other industries such as banking and insurance that rely upon its information. Such an attempt is short-sighted and runs counter to the original purpose of the SSDI: to actually combat fraud.

 

The Records Preservation & Access Committee (RPAC) is a joint coalition of international genealogical societies representing millions of genealogists and family historians, and just announced the launch of its Stop ID Theft NOW! campaign with its We The People petition posted at WhiteHouse.gov. Here’s the petition. To sign the petition, read the instructions.

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Poll: Have you discovered an ancestral home?

Poll: Have you discovered an ancestral home? | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Census records are a fantastic tool.
However, the details in the records leave much to the imagination. That is - of course - until you investigate the address listed on the census entry.

My Heritage asks in the poll if you've visited any ancestral homes. Alternatively, you could leave a comment to the blog. 

 

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CGSSD Meeting on Saturday, 21 January

CGSSD Meeting on Saturday, 21 January | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Features Denise Spurlock; The Computer Genealogy Society of San Diego meets on the 3rd Saturday of each month (except December) from 9:00 a.m. to noon on the campus of UCSD, University of California, San Diego.

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SISTORY - History of Slovenia

SISTORY - History of Slovenia | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

History of Slovenia – SIstory web portal contains digitalised contents identical to the originals and the original digital contents. All the contents were verified during the review process.

The majority of the content at the SIstory web portal is available under the conditions of the Slovene licence Creative Commons 2.5, which would allow a broad use and exploitation of copyrighted works published on the SIstory web portal.

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How to start my genealogy research?

How to start my genealogy research? | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Janez Toplišek (2005), Rodoslovje (=Genealogy; in Slovenian; 36o pages).

 

The book is recommended to beginners and experienced researchers due to many useful information on sources for genealogy research in Slovenia and abroad (Status animarum, registers, census and population records, citizenship). The book gives first information on historical geography and cartography, land and cadastral registers, feudal land registers, Slovenians in emigration as well as on tools, useful for research (Genealogical computer programs, Internet sources and genetic genealogy).

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Digital treasury - dLib.si

Digital treasury - dLib.si | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Digital Library of Slovenia, Digital treasury - dLib.si : Digitalna Knjižnica Slovenije, Digitalna zakladnica ...

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Argentina Research on the FamilySearch Wiki

Argentina Research on the FamilySearch Wiki | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

By Lineagekeeper; Posted on 27 December 2012, Posted in: FamilySearch Wiki, Genealogy, Research.


The FamilySearch Wiki contains dozens of articles to aid in research for Argentina records. The articles covers dozens of topics and include links to a wealth of Argentina record collections on FamilySearch.

Knapco's insight:

Argentina's population and culture were heavily shaped by immigrants from throughout Europe, but most particularly Italy and Spain, which provided the largest percentage of newcomers from 1860 to 1930. After WWII also many Slovenians emigrated to Argentina, therefore the on-line articles and data sources might be of interest to our genealogists.

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Adobe Photoshop Genealogy I Brush Set

Adobe Photoshop Genealogy I Brush Set | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Adobe Photoshop Genealogy I Brush Set Pt. 1. Download. Adobe Photoshop Genealogy I Brush Set Pt. 2. Download.

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Webinar: Family history research made easier

Webinar: Family history research made easier | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

MyHeritage blog. Following the success of How to find your relatives in the 1940 US Census, we invite you to register for our next webinar: "Family Tree Builder: Tips and tricks to make family history research easier." The webinar will take place on Thursday, May 17 at 2pm EDT*.

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SLOVENIAN ROOTS QUEST: Portrait of a Family in Transition: The ...

SLOVENIAN ROOTS QUEST: Portrait of a Family in Transition: The ... | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

SLOVENIAN ROOTS QUEST. Tangled roots, family secrets, a famous immigrant writer who died under mysterious circumstances. Accordions, polkas, and potica. And now a new twist: Josephine and Jožefa, or My Year of Cooking.

 

I can't deny it: I'm a late-in-life, born again Slovenka. It is surprising that it took so long, since I grew up in and around Cleveland, which boasts the world's second largest Slovenian population. But aside from our yearly potica-making ritual, my mother never talked much about her ethnic roots, either in America or in the tiny, beautiful Alpine land of Slovenia, once part of Yugoslavia. Her parents were named Kozlevcar and Adamic. My grandmother was a cousin of Louis Adamic, the famous leftist writer from the 1930's and 1940's

 

 

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Blair K's comment, August 3, 2012 9:50 PM
Thank you for posting this entry from my Slovenian Roots Quest website (www.slovenianroots.blogspot.com.) Lately, I have turned to cooking from vintage Slovenian American cookbooks as one more way of exploring my roots.
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Slovenian Genealogist at Work

Slovenian Genealogist at Work | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Slovenian Genealogy Society (Slovensko rodoslovno društvo - SRD) is composed of volunteers, who are willing to share their knowledge and research results either online or off-line, organize lectures or seminars, and record preservation or transcription projects. Young researcher can learn from those more experienced via web site, forum and regular events about recent developments, genealogical sources and archive records. In Slovenia, these are civil and ecclesiastical registers (birth, death and matrimonial records). Personal civil records cover mainly a period of last 100 years.

 

Church registers were started in the 17th century, only exceptionally in the 16th century. These are registers of births, marriages and deaths, which were obligatory recorded by the parish priests. Records in civil and church registers are official - primary genealogical sources. There are many other useful secondary sources, which can help in genealogy research, as archival guides. Archives of the Republic of Slovenia and Ljubljana Historical Archives have published them online. Archiepiscopal Archives of Maribor and Ljubljana have issued guides several times; recent ones are available in their reading rooms, but they are not online. For the entire country the Guide to the church registers for the ​​SR Slovenia (1972) is the most appropriate, following by Guide to the parish archives in Slovenia.

 

Among available genealogy software programs the SRD recommends these, which are compatible and enable an export of a standardized GEDCOM file with information about persons and their relationships. In that format data can be shared with other genealogists, added to online databases, or converted into family web sites. In Slovenia, Brother's Keeper is still the most used genealogy software. Its advantage over others is in the translation into the Slovenian language and support for special characters of the alphabet. Many other programs do not have these preliminary conditions. One of the most recent software programs that also meets these requirements is My Heritage Family Tree Builder. It enables also social networking service – creating family websites, where genealogists can share data and build their family trees online. Members can upload their family trees and contact other family historians to fill in gaps in their research.

 

The Slovenian genealogy site provides many other helpful links. Interesting open source software is Gramps, which tends to serve both, non-professional and professional genealogists. It can be downloaded from SourceForge page.

 

Among the SRD’s reference files an index of electronically recorded persons is popular. Worth mentioning is the list of settlements and other toponyms, which is more helpful than would be concluded by title. It is worth knowing and considering the association’s recommendations for genealogy work.

 

Some active genealogists have made signposts to many genealogical sources from their websites. For example, Mr. Fonda and Mr. Zavodnik. The most complete global genealogical signpost is certainly www.cyndislist.com.

 

Among national sources we have to mention SiStory portal (preparing to digitize The trees), dLib portal, where among many others a Lexicon of Drava Province is published (http://www.zape.si/srd/pdf/ldb.pdf), and Kamra portal (Digitized cultural heritage of Slovenian regions).

 

Search for people abroad is available through worldwide repository of genealogical information such as Ancestry and the FamilySearch site (some of the content is available only via subscription). The most popular sites for Slovenian genealogists in Europe are probably French Geneanet and the site of German association.

 

In support of search for ancestors through the World Wide Web, and permanent storage of personal data that are specific to genealogy, are increasingly included in Google search and G+ or Facebook timeline. Therefore, the prospect of many startling novelties in near future maybe could not avoid discussion on data security and data protection rights.

Source: SRD website

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Does Genealogy Software Force Me to be Conclusion-Based?

Does Genealogy Software Force Me to be Conclusion-Based? | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Ancestry word forums: A blog discussion is launched: are we forced to be a Conclusion-based genealogists by the genealogy management programs we use?

 

Comparing RootsMagic 5, Legacy Family Tree 7.5 and Family Tree Maker 2012 an administrator is pointing out that they handle Facts differently, and seem to promote Conclusion-based genealogy. That's understandable - they are database programs and many researchers "want to have something in every field."

How do other genealogy management program enable Evidence-based genealogy? How should these GMPs enable it?....

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WorldVitalRecords Newsletter 2012

WorldVitalRecords Newsletter 2012 | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

MyHeritage & WorldVitalRecords have made an important improvement built in Family Tree Builder 6.0 with offered matching of the family tree members to records from different sources, gathered trough WorldVitalRecords. Indirect access to more than 3,600,000,000 names in birth, marriage, death and vital records enriches a chance to find your ancestors.

 

WorldVitalRecords interface enables searching trough a newspaper collection with more than 1 billion articles from 1739 to the present, large historical map collection with 2 million maps and 200 million names of landowners, a yearbook collection, which includes more than 8,000 high school, college, and military yearbooks, and the world's largest index of tombstone inscriptions and tombstone photographs with more than 30 million photos.

 

In order to explore how search engines work for your family history research your family tree has to be published on the Internet, in a family site MyHeritage.com (could be made private).

 

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Robert FONDA - GeneaNet

Robert FONDA - GeneaNet | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Robert Fonda has compiled the most extensive collection of genealogical research in the field of Slovenian Karst, Brkini and surrounding areas.

 

Fonda Family tree.

People with surname Cerkvenik.

Contact.

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An interesting year for the number two genealogy website, some say number one

An interesting year for the number two genealogy website, some say number one | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Sandy Arnone, SpittalStreet.com: "Having recently read a list of MyHeritage.com accomplishments for 2011, this year I’ll be paying a lot more attention to what they’re offering users."

 

MyHeritage.com made useful improvement to their Family Tree Builder software, which includes the ability to import files from other sources (GEDCOM) and MyHeritage is now translated into 38 languages - Slovanian included. Family Tree Builder 6.0 is available for download free of charge.

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RootsTech 2012: MyHeritage is on its way!

RootsTech 2012: MyHeritage is on its way! | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

MyHeritage: While genealogy conferences bring together genealogists for learning, sharing, collaborating, RootsTech - February 2-4, in Salt Lake City, Utah - brings together technology developers and genealogy consumers.

Day 1 and Day 2 highlights at RootsTech by MyHeritage and World Vital Records, who can help advance a family research.

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Drevesa - Slovenian genealogy periodical publication

The Slovenian Genealogy Society provides an archive of electronic issues of journal Drevesa . It has been bringing articles on Slovenian genealogy research and projects in Slovenian language since 1994.

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Slovenian Genealogical Index of family and first names

Slovenian Genealogical Index of family and first names | Slovenian Genealogy Research | Scoop.it

Slovenian Genealogical Society has prepared a database of family names, first names, dates and places of birth, which can be used at genealogist's research to find out if their names of interest are already documented in one of the genealogies that are contributed to the collection of Slovenian Genealogical Society. You are invited to add your own genealogy data to the existing collection (contact administrator).

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