sleep serves many functions on the brain
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The 7 Sleep Habits of Successful Entrepreneurs

The 7 Sleep Habits of Successful Entrepreneurs | sleep serves many functions on the brain | Scoop.it
Poor sleep can affect your ability to make good business decisions. Here's how to keep your business strong while still catching some shut eye.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Change My Bad Habits's curator insight, October 27, 2013 7:56 PM

Sleep is a keystone habit, meaning it is a habit that has a great impact on MANY other habits and habit change.  Learning the positive sleep techniques of these successful people can therefore help you immensely in all forms of lifetyle modification, personal development and changing the important parts of yourself that you desire to change.

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Brains flush toxic waste in sleep, including Alzheimer’s-linked protein, study of mice finds

Brains flush toxic waste in sleep, including Alzheimer’s-linked protein, study of mice finds | sleep serves many functions on the brain | Scoop.it
Study pinpoints another reason for sleep: to flush out toxic waste, including Alzheimer’s-linked proteins.
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Brain flushes toxic waste during sleep, including Alzheimer’s-linked protein, study finds

Brain flushes toxic waste during sleep, including Alzheimer’s-linked protein, study finds | sleep serves many functions on the brain | Scoop.it

While we are asleep, our bodies may be resting, but our brains are busy taking out the trash. A new study has found that the cleanup system in the brain, responsible for flushing out toxic waste products that cells produce with daily use, goes into overdrive in mice that are asleep. The cells even shrink in size to make for easier cleaning of the spaces around them.

 

The pictures shows the difference of cerebrospinal fluid influx is seen in the brain of an awake and a sleeping mouse. Fluorescent dye has been injected into the animal to enable viewing of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in a mouse that is still alive. The red represents the greater flow in a sleeping animal, while the green represents conversely restricted flow in the same awake animal.

 

Scientists say this nightly self-clean by the brain provides a compelling biological reason for the restorative power of sleep. “Sleep puts the brain in another state where we clean out all the byproducts of activity during the daytime,” said study author and University of Rochester neurosurgeon Maiken Nedergaard. Those byproducts include beta-amyloid protein, clumps of which form plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients.

 

Staying up all night could prevent the brain from getting rid of these toxins as efficiently, and explain why sleep deprivation has such strong and immediate consequences. Too little sleep causes mental fog, crankiness, and increased risks of migraine and seizure. Rats deprived of all sleep die within weeks.

 

Although as essential and universal to the animal kingdom as air and water, sleep is a riddle that has baffled scientists and philosophers for centuries. Drifting off into a reduced consciousness seems evolutionarily foolish, particularly for those creatures in danger of getting eaten or attacked.

 

One line of thinking was that sleep helps animals to conserve energy by forcing a period of rest. But this theory seems unlikely since the sleeping brain uses up almost as much energy as the awake brain, Nedergaard said.

 

Another puzzle involves why different animals require different amounts of sleep per night. For instance, cats sleep more than 12 hours a day, while elephants need only about three hours. Based on this newfound purpose of sleep, neuroscientist Suzana Herculano-Houzel speculates in a commentary that the varying sleep needs across species might be related to brain size. Larger brains should have a relatively larger volume of space between cells, and may need less time to clean since they have more room for waste to accumulate throughout the day.

 

Sleep does play a key role in memory formation — mentally going through the events of the day and stamping certain memories into the brain. But sleeping for eight hours or more just to consolidate memories seems excessive, Nedergaard said, especially for an animal such as a mouse.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The First Real Reason We Need To Sleep - Business Insider

The First Real Reason We Need To Sleep - Business Insider | sleep serves many functions on the brain | Scoop.it
While you are sleeping your brain's cleaning system goes into overdrive, flushing toxins from the spaces around your brain cells and removing them.

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Why do we sleep? To clean our brains, say US scientists - The Guardian

Why do we sleep? To clean our brains, say US scientists - The Guardian | sleep serves many functions on the brain | Scoop.it
The Guardian
Why do we sleep? To clean our brains, say US scientists The Guardian Scientists in the US claim to have a new explanation for why we sleep: in the hours spent slumbering, a rubbish disposal service swings into action that cleans up...
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