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One small click for a man: NASA releases more than 17,000 photos from the Apollo program

One small click for a man: NASA releases more than 17,000 photos from the Apollo program | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
The archive, released through the Nasa-funded Lunar And Planetary Institute, shows both famous photos of Apollo 11 and everyday work for the astronauts in other missions.

 

This time 45 years ago, three Americans were orbiting the moon in the Apollo 8 space craft - the furthest from the Earth that any man had ever gone - and were paving the way for humanity's first successful mission to another celestial body. Astronauts Frank Borman, James Lovell and William Anders even read sections of the Book of Genesis as part of a Christmas Eve television broadcast. They were the first to photograph the Earth from far away and the moon up close - also capturing the now-famous 'Earthrise' photo while in lunar orbit.


Now Nasa has released more than 17,000 photos from the 33 Apollo astronauts who made it into space for the lunar missions, including the 12 men who set foot on the moon's surface.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Sharrock's curator insight, December 25, 2013 9:18 PM

pics for students and teachers to use and explore.

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From human-powered to hypersonic, a look at the top five aeronautical stories of 2013

From human-powered to hypersonic, a look at the top five aeronautical stories of 2013 | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
It’s almost 2014 and time for a bit of aeronautical reflection as we look back at what new technologies promise us a hypersonic, jet-packed future of aviati...
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‘IDF killed 2 terrorists, thwarted bombing on Gaza border’

‘IDF killed 2 terrorists, thwarted bombing on Gaza border’ | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Attack that killed Israeli worker Tuesday said to have been part of a more sophisticated plan to target an army patrol
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That should surely read "IDF terrorists kill 2 palestinians on their own land"

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Johannes Kepler featured in latest Google doodle

Johannes Kepler featured in latest Google doodle | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Doodle commemorates birthday of mathematician and astronomer who realised that the planets orbit the sun elliptically
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Happy Birthday Johannes Kepler!

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Phlite turns your camera gear into stylish lighting

Phlite turns your camera gear into stylish lighting | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
They say lighting is one of the most important aspects of photography, but we don't think this is what they meant! Phlite is a product which is designed tur...
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Why?

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How solar cells are taking over sea, sky and space

How solar cells are taking over sea, sky and space | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Solar panels have become increasingly ubiquitous and are found in many more places than just the roof. Gizmag collected some of the most surprising uses of ...
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Just not where it's neede the most, on land?

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Smartcharge lightbulb keeps the lights on when the power goes out

Smartcharge lightbulb keeps the lights on when the power goes out | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
The SmartCharge LED lightbulb includes technology that keeps the room lit in the event of a power outage, and can even determine whether someone has just tu...
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RUB researchers make bio-based solar cell breakthrough

RUB researchers make bio-based solar cell breakthrough | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
German researchers have created a bio-based solar cell capable of generating a continuous electrical current of several nanowatts per sq cm. The new approac...
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Researcher sending stem cells into space to observe rate of growth

Researcher sending stem cells into space to observe rate of growth | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
A US$30,000 grant will see Dr Abba Zubair of the Mayo Clinic send human stem cells to the International Space Station (ISS) to observe whether, as he believ...
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Scientists Map Vast Reserves Of Freshwater Under The Seabed

Scientists Map Vast Reserves Of Freshwater Under The Seabed | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Scientists think there are potentially valuable fresh groundwater reserves under the sea.
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London Christmas tree powered by a Brussels sprout battery

London Christmas tree powered by a Brussels sprout battery | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
To promote The Big Bang UK Young Scientists & Engineers Fair, a team of designers built the world's first Brussels sprout-powered battery and hooked it up t...
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China's first moon landing and the moon mineral they want - Channel 4 News

China's first moon landing and the moon mineral they want - Channel 4 News | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
The Chinese have successfully touched down spacecraft Chang'e 3 in the first moon landing since 1975. Why is the moon back on agenda? And what is the mystery mineral they're interested in?
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Storm Warnings: Extreme Weather Is a Product of Climate Change: Scientific American

Storm Warnings: Extreme Weather Is a Product of Climate Change: Scientific American | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
More violent and frequent storms, once merely a prediction of climate models, are now a matter of observation. Part 1 of a three-part series
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NASA's LLCD tests confirm laser communication capabilities in space

NASA's LLCD tests confirm laser communication capabilities in space | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
NASA says the results of its Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration’s (LLCD) 30-day test prove that laser communications are practical for space applicatio...
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Algae to crude oil: Million-year natural process takes minutes in the lab

Algae to crude oil: Million-year natural process takes minutes in the lab | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Engineers at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have created a continuous process that produces useful crude oil minute...
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The inside of a neutron star is superconducting as well as superfluid

The inside of a neutron star is superconducting as well as superfluid | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it

The Crab Nebula and the pulsar at its center are endlessly fascinating. The pulsar is a neutron star, with the same mass as our Sun but only the size of a city. It rotates 30 times per second, flashing like a lighthouse as it does so. It is very nearly, but not quite, an ideal clock, without any outside influence to disturb it. At Jodrell Bank Observatory, astronomers have been watching the pulsar for over 40 years, timing it without missing a beat while it rotated more than 30 billion times. Putting together the results from our radio observations with data from the opposite end of the electromagnetic spectrum has proved remarkably rewarding.

 

The pulsar has slowed down from 30.2 to 29.7 rotations per second while astronomers have been watching it. This is not unexpected: the energy stored in the rapid rotation powers not only the pulses which we observe but the whole of the Crab Nebula. This little neutron star is acting as a huge electrical generator, spinning at the same speed as a dynamo in a terrestrial power station but with a magnetic field billions of times greater. So far so good, but as is often the case, it is the odd things that seem to be going wrong that we are really interested in.

 

Astronomers also discovered so-called "glitches", sudden changes in the regular sequence of pulses, showing that the rotation has suddenly sped up, then recovered and started on a new regime of slowing down. We have seen this happen a couple of dozen times. The explanation involves some very strange physics inside the star. Although it is so condensed, the whole of the inside is liquid and only a thin crust is solid. Furthermore, the inside is superfluid, which allows it to rotate independently of the crust. Some times, however, it clutches onto the crust and the whole rotation rate suddenly changes; this is what causes the glitch.

 

What researchers have found recently is less obvious, having taken the whole of the 40 years to show up. The radio pulse is actually double, like a lighthouse with two beams. These two beams are nearly, but not quite, in opposite directions; how are they formed? Fortunately the Fermi gamma-ray telescope has helped to understand the strange geometry of the atmosphere outside the star, where the beams are formed. The whole of this atmosphere is rotating with the star itself, swept round by the powerful magnetic field. It is called a magnetosphere, and it is forced to move so fast that it reaches relativistic speeds; the radiation appears to originate at a location so far outside the surface that it is moving with half the velocity of light. Now comes some more new physics.

 

The inside of a neutron star is superconducting as well as superfluid. This means that the strength and shape of the huge dipole magnetic field is fixed, or can change only very slowly. So the pattern of the magnetic field in the magnetosphere, where the radiated beams are formed, is fixed. But the star is less than 1000 years old (it was formed in a supernova explosion in the year 1054), so we have been observing it for an appreciable fraction of its lifetime. And we have indeed found a change in the pattern of the double pulse. The two parts are moving apart, at the rate of 3o in the whole lifetime of the star. What this means is that the dipole is not tidily arranged at a right angle to the rotation, as it would be in a power station dynamo, but it is tilted at around 45o and slowly moving to wards the expected orthogonal arrangement. Now the theorists have to take over and explain how that can happen!


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ultrasonic nozzle promises better cleaning with less water

Ultrasonic nozzle promises better cleaning with less water | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
A newly-developed ultrasonic nozzle allows ordinary water to do a better job at cleaning.
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Scientists run eye cells through an inkjet printer

Scientists run eye cells through an inkjet printer | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Imagine if conditions that presently cause blindness could be treated by simply by fabricating new retinal tissue. We may not be at that point yet, but we'v...
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Wow, that could be revolutanary?

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Smokio Smart e-cigarette allows users to monitor their habit via smartphone app

Smokio Smart e-cigarette allows users to monitor their habit via smartphone app | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
A new product has just been announced called Smokio, which takes the electronic portion of electronic cigarettes to heart, adding connections to smartphones...
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Cutting the cord: Gizmag's Top 10 off-grid homes

Cutting the cord: Gizmag's Top 10 off-grid homes | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
An off-grid home frees the owner from the vagaries of unscrupulous energy giants, can potentially help reduce impact on the environment, and offers a greate...
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First vodka-powered text message sent

First vodka-powered text message sent | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
A molecular messaging system capable of transmitting over several meters has been built using off-the-shelf materials costing around US$100. The invention s...
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Is there anything booze can't do?

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Romania's digital museum merges sustainable architecture with 3D technology

Romania's digital museum merges sustainable architecture with 3D technology | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Claudiu Ionescu is the architect behind Romania's very first digital museum. Situated near the Mures Floodplain Natural Park in Pecica, the unusual and chap...
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Micro laser sintering technology to 3D print tiny metal parts

Micro laser sintering technology to 3D print tiny metal parts | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
3D MicroPrint has developed a new micro laser sintering technology that can 3D print Molybdenum, Tungsten, and other metals in minuscule detail and with mic...
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Windows 8.1 tips, tricks and secrets

What's changed in Microsoft's Windows 8.1 upgrade? Master the tweaks in no time with our expert advice.
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Earth's poles are shifting because of climate change - environment - 13 December 2013 - New Scientist

Earth's poles are shifting because of climate change - environment - 13 December 2013 - New Scientist | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Global warming is causing the North Pole's position to drift, offering a new way to study the impact of our greenhouse-gas emissions
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