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Nanomaterials Improve Both the Anode and Cathode of Li-ion Batteries

Nanomaterials Improve Both the Anode and Cathode of Li-ion Batteries | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it

Researchers develop production methods that strike balance between performance and cost-effectiveness.

 

Lithium-ion batteries are a popular type of rechargeable battery commonly found in portable electronics and electric or hybrid cars. Traditionally, lithium-ion batteries contain a graphite anode, but silicon has recently emerged as a promising anode substitute because it is the second most abundant element on earth and has a theoretical capacity of 3600 milliamp hours per gram (mAh/g), almost 10 times the capacity of graphite. The capacity of a lithium-ion battery is determined by how many lithium ions can be stored in the cathode and anode. Using silicon in the anode increases the battery's capacity dramatically because one silicon atom can bond up to 3.75 lithium ions, whereas with a graphite anode six carbon atoms are needed for every lithium atom.

 

The USC Viterbi team developed a cost-effective (and therefore commercially viable) silicon anode with a stable capacity above 1100 mAh/g for extended 600 cycles, making their anode nearly three times more powerful and longer lasting than a typical commercial anode.

Up until recently, the successful implementation of silicon anodes in lithium-ion batteries faced one big hurdle: the severe pulverization of the electrode due to the volume expansion and retraction that occurs with the use of silicon. Last year, the same team led by USC Viterbi electrical engineering professor Chongwu Zhou developed a successful anode design using porous silicon nanowires that allowed the material to expand and contract without breaking, effectively solving the pulverization problem.

 

This solution yielded a new problem, however: the method of producing nanostructured silicon was prohibitively expensive for commercial adoption.

 

Undeterred, graduate student Mingyuan Ge and other members of Zhou's team built on their previous work to develop a cost-efficient method of producing porous silicon particles through the simple and inexpensive methods of ball-milling and stain-etching. "Our method of producing nanoporous silicon anodes is low-cost and scalable for mass production in industrial manufacturing, which makes silicon a promising anode material for the next generation of lithium-ion batteries," said Zhou. "We believe it is the most promising approach to applying silicon anodes in lithium-ion batteries to improve capacity and performance."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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NASA set to release online software catalog

NASA set to release online software catalog | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it

Get ready for a stimulating software catalog. You may want to write NASA CAT. next to Thursday, April 10, on your calendar. That is the day that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is to make available to the public, at no cost, more than 1,000 codes with its release of a new online software catalog. The catalog, a master list organized into 15 categories, is intended for industry, academia, other government agencies, and general public. The catalog covers technology topics ranging from project management systems, design tools, data handling, image processing, solutions for life support functions, aeronautics, structural analysis, and robotic and autonomous systems. NASA said the codes represent NASA's best solutions to an array of complex mission requirements.

"Software is an increasingly important element of the agency's intellectual asset portfolio," said Jim Adams, deputy chief technologist with NASA. "It makes up about one-third of its reported inventions each year." With this month's release of the software catalog, he said, the software becomes widely available to the public. Each NASA code was evaluated, however, for access restrictions and designated for a specific type of release, ranging from codes open to all U.S. citizens to codes restricted to use by other federal agencies.

 

The catalog nonetheless fits into NASA's ongoing efforts to transfer more NASA technologies to American industry and U.S. consumers As Wired's Robert McMillan wrote on Friday, "This NASA software catalog will list more than 1,000 projects, and it will show you how to actually obtain the code you want. The idea to help hackers and entrepreneurs push these ideas in new directions—and help them dream up new ideas."

 

Adams said, "By making NASA resources more accessible and usable by the public, we are encouraging innovation and entrepreneurship. Our technology transfer program is an important part of bringing the benefit of space exploration back to Earth for the benefit of all people."

Daniel Lockney, technology transfer program executive with NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist, underscored this down-to-earth mission side of NASA in 2012 in an article in Innovation in 2012. "NASA really is the gold standard for technology transfer," he then said. "The money spent on research and development doesn't just go up into space; it comes down to earth in the form of some very practical and tangible results." Lockney said they know the investment in technology creates jobs, boosts the economy and provides benefits in addition to the mission focus. "Our technologies have done everything from make hospitals more efficient to making transportation safer and greener. The technology reaches into all aspects about our lives."


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Russ Roberts's curator insight, April 5, 10:47 PM

This could prove interesting to anyone interested in science and technology.  "Wired" spokesman Robert McMillan says this NASA Software Catalog "will list more than 1,000 projects and it will show you how to actually obtain the codes you want."  NASA spokesman Jim Adams adds that the release of the catalog "is an important part of bringing the benefits of space exploration back to Earth for the benefit of all people."  Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

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Raspberry Pi Used To Hijack Drone Over Wi-Fi

Raspberry Pi Used To Hijack Drone Over Wi-Fi | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Drones continue to cause concern, as a hacker shows how to compromise a Parrot drone using some cheap equipment and freely-available software
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'Sixth sense' debunked with simple test (Wired UK)

'Sixth sense' debunked with simple test (Wired UK) | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
"We were able to show that while observers could reliably sense changes that they could not visually identify, this ability was not due to extrasensory perception or a sixth sense"
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Exploiting graphene, the wonder substance, for the UK

Exploiting graphene, the wonder substance, for the UK | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Letters: Graphene probably is the best thing since sliced bread, but it is hard to see how it can be commercially exploited in the absence of something to exploit
Sascha Humphrey's insight:

Another case were discoveries made here in Britain are exploited on other shores, because we've gotta be the most short sighted, narrow minded nation on earth when it come exploiting and making money from ground breaking discoveries and inventions, specially with those Tory wankers running the show!!!
We discover & invent while others reap the huge financial benefits.....

 

"The chancellor has stated that we are to exploit the invention of graphene in this country. In this regard it may be worth contrasting the numbers of patents held by Manchester University, where it was discovered (0), and Samsung (a lot)."

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Orproject proposes huge sealed Bubble of clean air for Beijing

Orproject proposes huge sealed Bubble of clean air for Beijing | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Beijing's air quality is reportedly very poor, with the city recently recording some of its worst smog levels ever. In response, architecture firm Orproject...
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About Spritz | Spritz

About Spritz | Spritz | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
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Spritz’s mission is to change the way people read and make communication faster, easier, and more effective.

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Weather@home 2014: the causes of the UK winter floods | climateprediction.net

Weather@home 2014: the causes of the UK winter floods | climateprediction.net | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
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Sugar-powered batteries could be the future

Sugar-powered batteries could be the future | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Currently, lithium-ion batteries are the go-to for all technological needs, but they could soon fall by the wayside with news of a sugar-powered battery which lasts 10 times as long.
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Viruses and Infections in Honeybees Are Endangering Bumblebees

Viruses and Infections in Honeybees Are Endangering Bumblebees | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Wild bumblebees are important contributors to the ecosystem. They provide pollination to a lot of the world’s flowers as well as foods, helping produce 87 of the leading food crops worldwide. If they were lost in nature, it would be devastating for plants.
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Can You Go the Speed of Light? - YouTube

Einstein's classic thought experiment involves sitting on a train travelling at the speed of light. If you hold a mirror in front of your face, will you see ...
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Scientists estimate 16,000 tree species in the Amazon

Scientists estimate 16,000 tree species in the Amazon | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Researchers, taxonomists, and students from The Field Museum and 88 other institutions around the world have provided new answers to two simple but long-standing questions about Amazonian diversity: How many trees are there in the Amazon, and how many tree species occur there?
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Arctic News: Extreme weather strikes around the globe

Arctic News: Extreme weather strikes around the globe | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
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How 3D Printing Creates On-Demand Swarms of Disposable Drones

How 3D Printing Creates On-Demand Swarms of Disposable Drones | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it

New advances in 3D printing are making it not only possible but also viable to manufacture cheap, print-on-demand, disposable drones designed simply to soar off over the horizon and never come back. Some British engineers did just that, and this is only the beginning. The team hails from the Advanced Manufacturing Research Center (AMRC) at the University of Sheffield, where they're exploring innovative ways to 3D-print complex designs. They built their disposable drone, a five-foot-wide guy made of just nine parts that looks like a tiny stealth bomber, using a technique called fused deposition modeling. This additive manufacturing technique has been around since the 1980s but has recently become faster and cheaper thanks to improved design processes.


The ultimate vision, as sUAS describes it, is for "cheap and potentially disposable UAVs that could be built and deployed in remote situations potentially within as little as 24 hours." Forward-operating teams equipped with 3D printers could thus generate their own semi-autonomous micro air force squadrons or airborne surveillance swarms, a kind of first-strike desktop printing team hurling disposable drones into the sky.


For now, the AMRC team's drone works well as a glider, and they're working on a twin ducted fan propulsion system. It will eventually get an autonomous operation system powered by GPS as well as on-board data logging of flight parameters. Presumably, someone will want to stick a camera on there, too. If they're successful at building these things cheaply enough, it will be a green flag for the rest of the industry to take a hard look at their designs and see if they can make a disposable drone, too.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 4, 7:36 PM

This is going to get ugly.

 

The arms race between the people and the government is just beginning. 

 

Cause, I can think of all sorts of mayhem that can be raised with this technology, all of it spontaneously generated from the conditions in which people are living, caused primarily by our elite factions, public and private alike.

 

You SURE you want to be holding those reigns of "power" when they come for you?

 

Think about it.

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16 things Gravity got wrong (and some things it got right, too) | Spaceanswers.com

16 things Gravity got wrong (and some things it got right, too) | Spaceanswers.com | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Obviously there are heavy spoilers in this post, so read on at your own peril...
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Earthship Biotecture - Radically Sustainable Buildings

Earthship Biotecture - Radically Sustainable Buildings | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
The Ultimate in Green Buildings. Thermal, solar heating and cooling, solar and wind electricity, contained sewage treatment, catchwater. recycled materials.
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RDFRS: Forests Around Chernobyl Aren’t Decaying Properly

RDFRS: Forests Around Chernobyl Aren’t Decaying Properly | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
It wasn't just people, animals and trees that were affected by radiation exposure at Chernobyl, but also the decomposers: insects, microbes, and fungi.
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Stamp of approval for new living cell printing technique

Stamp of approval for new living cell printing technique | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Researchers in Huston have developed a cost effective method for printing living cells with almost a 100 percent survival rate. The method which resembles t...
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"A new cell-printing technique similar to the ancient art of block printing could see the cell stamps produced for around $1"

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Diamond Armor bullet-proof suit provides stylish protection for a cool US$3.2 million

Diamond Armor bullet-proof suit provides stylish protection for a cool US$3.2 million | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Developed by SuitArt, the Diamond Armor is a diamond-studded, bullet-proof, air-conditioned, bespoke-tailored suit costing US$3.2 million, making it the mos...
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Citizen science can lower costs and increase excellence in research

Citizen science can lower costs and increase excellence in research | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
To date, citizen science has focused on top-down science communication. But as the exemplar of astronomy highlights, amateur enthusiasts can make significant contributions. It’s time to capture this potential, to expand the scope and excellence of research, says Fermin Serrano
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ShareRoller: First Portable Motor for Share Bikes and More

The first portable electric motor drive for bike share programs (US, Canada, and the UK) that also works on your own bike or scooter.
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Sugar battery offers hope of green-powered gadgets within three years

Sugar battery offers hope of green-powered gadgets within three years | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Virginia Tech research means longer-lasting smartphones, tablets and games consoles safely powered by sugar could be available soon. By Samuel Gibbs
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This is fantastic news!!! :)

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600 year old mystery manuscript decoded by University of Bedfordshire professor - beds.ac.uk

600 year old mystery manuscript decoded by University of Bedfordshire professor - beds.ac.uk | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Sascha Humphrey's insight:

Partially decoded and he want's others to join him to decode it completely!

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El Niño may make 2014 the hottest year on record - environment - 10 February 2014 - New Scientist

El Niño may make 2014 the hottest year on record - environment - 10 February 2014 - New Scientist | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Long-term weather forecasts suggest 2014 might be the hottest year since records began, as climate bad-boy El Niño seems to be preparing to rear its head
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Presbyterians Declare War on the Jews « Commentary Magazine

Presbyterians Declare War on the Jews « Commentary Magazine | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
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