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NOT WHITE ENOUGH TO IMMIGRATE TO ISRAEL

NOT WHITE ENOUGH TO IMMIGRATE TO ISRAEL | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Several hundred mixed-race Peruvian converts, also known as the “Jews of the Amazon,” are not being granted permission to immigrate to Israel under the Law of Return, despite meeting all the requir...
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Proving once again that Israel is a racist, aparheid state!!!!

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University of Oxford develops low-cost self-driving car system

University of Oxford develops low-cost self-driving car system | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Oxford University’s Mobile Robotics Group (MRG) has developed an autonomous navigation system for cars at a building cost of only £5,000.
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Death from a swarm of tiny drones: U.S. Air Force releases terrifying video of tiny flybots that can can hover, stalk and even kill targets

Death from a swarm of tiny drones: U.S. Air Force releases terrifying video of tiny flybots that can can hover, stalk and even kill targets | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
The Air Vehicles Directorate, a research arm of the Air Force, has released a video outlining the the future capabilities of Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAVs). The project promises to revolutionize war.
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Nicolaus Copernicus celebrated in Google doodle

Nicolaus Copernicus celebrated in Google doodle | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Astronomer whose heliocentric theory of the universe triggered a revolution in scientific thinking was born on 19 February 1473
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Happy Birthday Nicolaus Copernicus

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Twitter / iRevolt: Israeli soldier, Mor Ostrovski, ...

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Israeli soldier, Mor Ostrovski, points his weapon at a Palestinian kid, and posts a picture of it on Instagram pic.twitter.com/UOtUwXOf 

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Asteroid set for record near-miss

Asteroid set for record near-miss | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
A space rock the size of an Olympic swimming pool will pass harmlessly within 28,000km of Earth on Friday - just a tenth the distance to the Moon.
Sascha Humphrey's insight:

 Let's just hope NASA has improved it's maths skills since 1999 or we can kiss our proverbial goodbye! haha 
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg16422070.900-schoolkid-blunder-brought-down-mars-probe.html
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn9175-spacecraft-collision-due-to-catalogue-of-errors.html

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LHC switches off for two-year break

LHC switches off for two-year break | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
The Large Hadron Collider shuts down for a two-year-long period of maintenance and upgrades that should see a near-doubling of its collision energies.
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Printed human organs for testing and transplantation | News & events | Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh

Printed human organs for testing and transplantation | News & events | Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
A specialised 3D printing process, using human stem cells, could pave the way to purpose-built replacement organs for patients, eliminating the need for organ donation, immune suppression and the problem of transplant rejection.
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MIT engineers design new synthetic biology circuits that combine memory and logic

MIT engineers design new synthetic biology circuits that combine memory and logic | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it

MIT engineers have created genetic circuits in bacterial cells that not only perform logic functions, but also remember the results, which are encoded in the cell’s DNA and passed on for dozens of generations.

The circuits could be used as long-term environmental sensors, efficient controls for biomanufacturing, or to program stem cells to differentiate into other cell types.

“Almost all of the previous work in synthetic biology that we’re aware of has either focused on logic components or on memory modules that just encode memory. We think complex computation will involve combining both logic and memory, and that’s why we built this particular framework to do so,” says Timothy Lu, an MIT assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science and biological engineering.

 

Synthetic biologists use interchangeable genetic parts to design circuits that perform a specific function, such as detecting a chemical in the environment. In that type of circuit, the target chemical would generate a specific response, such as production of green fluorescent protein (GFP).  

Circuits can also be designed for any type of Boolean logic function, such as AND gates and OR gates. Using those kinds of gates, circuits can detect multiple inputs. In most of the previously engineered cellular logic circuits, the end product is generated only as long as the original stimuli are present: Once they disappear, the circuit shuts off until another stimulus comes along.

Lu and his colleagues set out to design a circuit that would be irreversibly altered by the original stimulus, creating a permanent memory of the event. To do this, they drew on memory circuits that Lu and colleagues designed in 2009. Those circuits depend on enzymes known as recombinases, which can cut out stretches of DNA, flip them, or insert them. Sequential activation of those enzymes allows the circuits to count events happening inside a cell.

Lu designed the new circuits so that the memory function is built into the logic gate itself. With a typical cellular AND gate, the two necessary inputs activate proteins that together turn on expression of an output gene. However, in the new circuits, the inputs stably alter regions of DNA that control GFP production. These regions, known as promoters, recruit the cellular proteins responsible for transcribing the GFP gene into messenger RNA, which then directs protein assembly.

For example, in one circuit described in the paper, two DNA sequences called terminators are interposed between the promoter and the output gene (GFP, in this case). Each of these terminators inhibits the transcription of the output gene and can be flipped by a different recombinase enzyme, making the terminator inactive.

Each of the circuit’s two inputs turns on production of one of the recombinase enzymes needed to flip a terminator. In the absence of either input, GFP production is blocked. If both are present, both terminators are flipped, resulting in their inactivation and subsequent production of GFP.

Once the DNA terminator sequences are flipped, they can’t return to their original state — the memory of the logic gate activation is permanently stored in the DNA sequence. The sequence also gets passed on for at least 90 generations. Scientists wanting to read the cell’s history can either measure its GFP output, which will stay on continuously, or if the cell has died, they can retrieve the memory by sequencing its DNA.

Using this design strategy, the researchers can create all two-input logic gates and implement sequential logic systems. “It’s really easy to swap things in and out,” says Lu, who is also a member of MIT’s Synthetic Biology Center. “If you start off with a standard parts library, you can use a one-step reaction to assemble any kind of function that you want.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Kids 'writing malicious hack code'

Kids 'writing malicious hack code' | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Children as young as 11 years old have been using programming skills to write malicious code to steal data, a security company warns.
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Halley VI Antarctic research station opens for business

Halley VI Antarctic research station opens for business | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Halley VI, Britain’s latest and greatest Antarctic Research Station, has opened and will become fully operational over the coming weeks.
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Bjork Needs Your Help to Teach Kids About Science, Technology, and Bjork - SPIN

Bjork Needs Your Help to Teach Kids About Science, Technology, and Bjork - SPIN | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Bjork Needs Your Help to Teach Kids About Science, Technology, and Bjork
SPIN
As SPIN previously reported, Biophilia's educational workshops grant children access to the apps and teaches kids about music, science, and technology.
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The Casple-Podadera city car knows when to fold 'em

The Casple-Podadera city car knows when to fold 'em | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
The Casple-Podadera is a two-seater city car that boasts a unique folding characteristic to allow it to fit in tight parking spaces usually reserved for mot...
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9 Exoplanets That Could Host Alien Life

9 Exoplanets That Could Host Alien Life | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
These nine planets represent our best hope for alien life beyond the solar system, according to the University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo.
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How Vaccines Have Changed Our World In One Graphic - Forbes

How Vaccines Have Changed Our World In One Graphic - Forbes | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
The data in this graphic come from the web site of the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, but a graphic designer in Purchase, N.Y., named Leon Farrant has created a graphic that drives home what the data mean.
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Engineers show feasibility of superfast materials: 'Organic topological insulators' for quantum computing

Engineers show feasibility of superfast materials: 'Organic topological insulators' for quantum computing | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Engineers demonstrated it is feasible to build the first organic materials that conduct electricity on their edges, but act as an insulator inside.
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Mor Ostrovski | The Times of Israel

Mor Ostrovski | The Times of Israel | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Sascha Humphrey's insight:

Just shows what kinda Zionist scum bags the US, Britain, Germany, and the rest who support Israel, support, about time we all wrote to our MP's/representatives and told them how we feel about this criminally racist/apartheid country, we are all responsible if we don't speak up!

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Genetically-Engineered Meat Isn’t Tested for Human Safety ... Because It’s Treated as an “Animal Drug” | Zero Hedge

Genetically-Engineered Meat Isn’t Tested for Human Safety ... Because It’s Treated as an “Animal Drug” | Zero Hedge | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Eater Beware ...
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Welcome to the Malware-Industrial Complex | MIT Technology Review

Welcome to the Malware-Industrial Complex | MIT Technology Review | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
The U.S. government is developing new computer weapons and driving a black market in “zero-day” bugs. The result could be a more dangerous Web for everyone.
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Not a Security Threat: How Israel Restricts Entry to the Occupied Territories

Not a Security Threat: How Israel Restricts Entry to the Occupied Territories | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
Global Comment | February 14th, 2013 at 10:27 am “What is the purpose of your stay in Israel?” For outsiders, the Israeli occupation of Palestine starts at Ben Gurion Airport. If you are Israeli, w...
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Listening to cells: Scientists probe human cells with ultrasound pulses

Listening to cells: Scientists probe human cells with ultrasound pulses | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it

Researchers from the University of Bordeaux in Franceused high-frequency sound waves to test the stiffness and viscosity of the nuclei of individual human cells to help answer questions such as how cells adhere to medical implants and why healthy cells turn cancerous.

 

“We have developed a new non-contact, non-invasive tool to measure the mechanical properties of cells at the sub-cell scale,” says Bertrand Audoin, a professor in the mechanics laboratory at the University of Bordeaux. “This can be useful to follow cell activity or identify cell disease.”

 

The technique, called picosecond ultrasonics, was initially developed to measure the thickness of semiconductor chip layers.

 

The researchers grew cells on a metal plate and then flashed the cell-metal interface with an ultra-short laser pulse to generate high-frequency sound waves. Another laser measured how the sound pulse propagated through the cells, giving the scientists clues about the mechanical properties of the individual cell components.

 

“The higher the frequency of sound you create, the smaller the wavelength, which means the smaller the objects you can probe” says Audoin. “We use gigahertz waves, so we can probe objects on the order of a hundred nanometers.” For comparison, a cell’s nucleus is about 10,000 nanometers wide.

 

In the coming years, the team envisions studying cancer cells with sound. “A cancerous tissue is stiffer than a healthy tissue,” notes Audoin. “If you can measure the rigidity of the cells while you provide different drugs, you can test if you are able to stop the cancer at the cell scale.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Katie Johnson's curator insight, April 30, 2013 2:23 PM

This article shows the different kinds of work ultra sounds can be used for, not just in pregnancy and other normal cases. It shows the variety of things I could be doing while on the job.

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Boundary conditions

Boundary conditions | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it
PULL a spring, let it go, and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back until, quite suddenly, it won't....

Via Joel Barker, Seth Dixon
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Joel Barker's curator insight, February 10, 2013 11:56 AM

A useful discussion on limits of the planet

Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2013 8:23 AM

This is an interesting article discussing the limits that the Earth's physical systems have and the importance not exceeding any tipping point that could destabilize the planet if we "overstrech the springs."

Angus Henderson's curator insight, February 11, 2013 11:49 AM

An interesting counter-balance to the work of the Planetary Boundaries group. 

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4.5 Billion 'Alien Earths' Calculated to Populate Our Own Milky Way

4.5 Billion 'Alien Earths' Calculated to Populate Our Own Milky Way | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it

Billions of Earth-like alien planets likely reside in our Milky Way galaxy, and the nearest such world may be just a stone's throw away in the cosmic scheme of things, a new study reports.

 

Astronomers have calculated that 6 percent of the galaxy's 75 billion or so red dwarfs — stars smaller and dimmer than the Earth's own sun — probably host habitable, roughly Earth-size planets. That works out to at least 4.5 billion such "alien Earths," the closest of which might be found a mere dozen light-years away, researchers said.

 

"We thought we would have to search vast distances to find an Earth-like planet," study lead author Courtney Dressing, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), said in a statement. "Now we realize another Earth is probably in our own backyard, waiting to be spotted."

 

Dressing and her team analyzed data gathered by NASA's prolific Kepler space telescope, which is staring continuously at more than 150,000 target stars. Kepler spots alien planets by flagging the tiny brightness dips caused when the planets transit, or cross the face of, their stars from the instrument's perspective.

 

Kepler has detected 2,740 exoplanet candidates since its March 2009 launch. Follow-up observations have confirmed only 105 of these possibilities to date, but mission scientists estimate that more than 90 percent will end up being the real deal.

 

In the new study, Dressing and her colleagues re-analyzed the red dwarfs in Kepler's field of view and found that nearly all are smaller and cooler than previously thought.

 

This new information bears strongly on the search for Earth-like alien planets, since roughly 75 percent of the galaxy's 100 billion or so stars are red dwarfs. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Gareth Harris's curator insight, February 8, 2013 11:47 AM

ET may only be a stones throw away!

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This Is Your Brain On Movies: Neuroscientists Weigh In On The Brain Science of Cinema

This Is Your Brain On Movies: Neuroscientists Weigh In On The Brain Science of Cinema | Slash's Science & Technology Scoop | Scoop.it

Posted by Rachel Nuwer on January 3, 2013 • 

 

"In movies, we explore landscapes far removed from our day-to-day lives. Whether experiencing the fantastical adventures of Star Wars or the dramatic throes of The English Patient, movies demand that our brains engage in a complex firing of neurons and cognitive processes. We enter into manipulated worlds where musical scores enhance feeling; where cinematography clues us into details we’d normally gloss over; where, like omniscient beings, we voyeuristically peek into others’ lives and minds; and where we can travel from Marrakech to Mars without ever having left our seat. Movies reflect reality, yet are anything but.

 

“Movies are highly complex, multidimensional stimuli,” said Uri Hasson, a neuroscientist and psychologist at Princeton University. “Some areas of the brain analyze sound bites, some analyze word context, some the sentence content, music, emotional aspect, color or motion."

...

 

TheCredits.org

Via CreativePlanetNetwork.com


Via Thierry Saint-Paul, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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