Skolbiblioteket och lärande
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Ny i svenska skolan: Läsförståelse och lässtrategier

Ny i svenska skolan: Läsförståelse och lässtrategier | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it

Det här med begrepp, och vad vi lägger in i dem, är alltid lika intressant att fundera kring. Jag har lite då och då hört läsförståelsestrategier och lässtrategier användas synonymt, som om det vore samma sak. Vilket det i och för sig kan vara men det behöver inte vara så.


Via Anna Kaya
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Anna Kaya's curator insight, February 9, 2014 5:02 AM

Jag skriver lite om lässtrategier, läsförståelse och ett funktionellt språkanvändande. Är läsförståelsestrategier och lässtrategier samma sak eller borde vi använda begreppet läsförståelseprocesser och se lässtrategier som verktyg som leder till en funktionell läsförmåga?

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Skolbibliotek lyfter facklitteratur - med Gläfs-projektet som stöd

Skolbibliotek lyfter facklitteratur - med Gläfs-projektet som stöd | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
Torrt och tråkigt med facklitteratur? Nej, knappast. Nu storsatsar nätverket Gläfs på ett läsfrämjande projekt där sakprosan ställs i fokus i undervisningen. (@Anna_Kaya @Ychen06 @cilladalen @stehagen Tänker på GLÄFS-projektet.
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Rätt nycklar låser upp texten | Lärarnas Nyheter

Rätt nycklar låser upp texten | Lärarnas Nyheter | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it

Med strategier för läsförståelse blir eleverna bättre läsare. Det såg Laila Guvå i en learning study. Nu använder hon kunskaperna i sin undervisning.


Via Anna Kaya, Eric Haraldsson
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Anna Kaya's curator insight, November 5, 2013 2:23 PM

Intressant Alfa-artikel lässtrategier och om att utveckla sin undervisning med hjälp av learning study.

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Children's Books at BooksShouldBeFree.com

Children's Books at BooksShouldBeFree.com | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
Free audio books in genre Children that you can download in mp3, iPod and iTunes format for your portable audio player.

Via Linda Denty, Elizabeth Hutchinson
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Linda Denty's curator insight, September 9, 2013 7:43 PM

Fantastic way to get classics into a home or library.  Ebooks and audiobooks and they are free.

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50 Books That Define the Past Five Years in Literature

50 Books That Define the Past Five Years in Literature | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
Five years ago this month saw the publication of Roberto Bolaño's 2666 in English. The book topped almost every year-end list and signaled a shift in literary tastes, creating larger audiences for ...

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 24, 2013 1:48 PM

 

Oh Oh! My bucket list of "Got to get around to reading __________ just got a whole lot longer!

 

A great article for educators whose familiarity with the "curriculum classics" far exceeds their familiarity of the contemporary literary scene. 

 

As I read the very brief justifications for each title's inclusion on this list I could not help but be inspired to do a bit of catching up.

 

And, as is usually the case, my mind could not help but generate a whole bunch of ideas about literature and learning about literature.

 

One of the first thoughts had to do with a recollection of my disappointment back in my college days when I was just shy of the days when I was going to begin to understand that I did NOT know it all AT ALL and I signed up for a contemporary literature course that did not include a single work that had been written after I was born. And, worse (in my mind at least) about a third of the works had been written before my parents had been born! The professor's explanation? Anything written in the 20th century is considered contemporary." End of discussion.

 

As it happened, perhaps "as it was meant to happen" Bokonon would say, it was somewhere around the time that I began to care enough about the distinction between great literature and popular literature. And, to my surprise, I began to discover an interesting pattern that suggested that many of the great works weren't perceived as great writing in their own times, and many were not perceived as great writing in their author's lifetimes. I always thought this was sort of sad for the authors who'd written books that had gone on to sell millions of copies to "someone else's financial benefit."

 

Another thought I had while reading this article was the irony that my work for the Google Lit Trips focused on books that are most commonly taught in schools  has left me little time for reading much of the current literature that inevitably contains titles destined to be among the most remembered and taught works in some future times.

 

This is not to say that many of these works are not already considered acceptable reading for course work. But, those that are, are more likely to be "credit-worthy" in classes where "outside reading projects" are add-ons to a standardized "required reading" focus. And, let me clarify that I think that in core courses this is a fine arrangement, particularly in light of the concern  regarding the perceived declining attention to literary reading as students climb the grade level ladder. 

 

This list might be a good starting place to add or revise and existing outside reading program to your ELA Literary Reading units.

 

Besides the benefits of students being allowed to design at least a portion of their own curriculum based upon an established "real" contemporary reading list and perhaps their existing interest in reading the kinds of books not quite yet on the radar of their teachers, it also offers the teacher an opportunity to let the students inform the teacher who can then model an interest in learning more about the kinds of reading with which he or she is not yet familiar. 

 

Imagine the opportunity to model the kind of receptiveness to reading books that we have less experience with than our students might have. Or put slightly differently, Imagine the opportunity to model the kind of receptiveness to reading books that we expect our students to have for books they have less experience with than their teachers.

 

I'd start by asking my students to read this article and make a list of the top three books that they personally might find potentially interesting. 

 

I might follow this with a casual "just for the heck of it" class survey to see if any of the titles were particularly popular across the entire class. (hoping that each title was selected by at least someone so that the class could see that interests vary among their friends and classmates.

 

 

24 Nov 2013

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

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Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Tools Students Can Use to Create Alternative Book Reports

Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Tools Students Can Use to Create Alternative Book Reports | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it

Via Amy Burns
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Amy Burns's curator insight, November 23, 2013 7:28 AM

Book Trailer for Readers to WeVideo...there are some good suggestions here.

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Bibliotekarier, lärare och läsförståelse | Vad gör de i biblioteket?

Bibliotekarier, lärare och läsförståelse | Vad gör de i biblioteket? | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
Bloggat om dagens träff på @NCandrasprak för lärare och oss i #skolbibliotek . Storifylänk ingår :) #ncläs http://t.co/Qb55uCjONJ
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IMAGES: 8 Inspiring Author Quote Illustrations

IMAGES: 8 Inspiring Author Quote Illustrations | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
We came across Kate Gavino's super cool Tumblr recently, Last Night's Reading, where she illustrates authors with some of their brilliant quotes said at readings.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 15, 2013 4:26 PM

Interesting...

 

I wonder how adapting this concept so that students mirrored this idea using a particularly memorable quote made by a character in the stories they are reading.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name for GLT Global ED and educational nonprofit.

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Ny i svenska skolan: Informationstjuvar aktiverar förförståelse

Ny i svenska skolan: Informationstjuvar aktiverar förförståelse | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it

Via Anna Kaya
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Anna Kaya's curator insight, November 5, 2013 4:44 PM

Läsrelaterade aktiviteter har jag skrivit om vid ett flertal gånger förut och i det här inlägget tänkte jag fokusera lite extra på en rätt rolig "före-läsning"-aktivitet som går ut på att man aktiverar elevernas förförståelse för att de lättare ska förstå textens innehåll. Aktiviteten bidrar också till att eleverna utvecklar strategier för att dra nytta av olika slags ledtrådar i en text för att öka förståelsen.

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Rätt nycklar låser upp texten | Lärarnas Nyhete...

Rätt nycklar låser upp texten | Lärarnas Nyhete... | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
Med strategier för läsförståelse blir eleverna bättre läsare. Det såg Laila Guvå i en learning study. Nu använder hon kunskaperna i sin undervisning.
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Nya sätt att redovisa sitt läsande

Nya sätt att redovisa sitt läsande | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
Fin stämning .... Rubriken på Årstaskolans blogginlägg om "Filmen-om-boken"
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Martin Ingvar: Varför går inte läsningen automatiskt?

Martin Ingvar var en av flera intressanta föredragshållare på Lättlästdagarna i Stockholm den 7-8 november. Martin hade mycket att säga om resultaten i den svenska skolan apropå den nu publicerade PISA-undersökningen. Han förutsåg en lång rad av...
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Viktigast: Att det finns böcker

Viktigast: Att det finns böcker | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
Boken är i kris. Läsandet är i kris.Om ni har hört den förut, så är det för att det är gamla nyheter.– Boken har alltid varit hotad, i samtliga fem statliga...

Via Eric Haraldsson
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How little libraries get people reading - Independent Online

How little libraries get people reading - Independent Online | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it

There's no card catalogue or late fees. The informal lending libraries work under a simple principle: “take a book, return a book.”


Via Karen Bonanno
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Karen Bonanno's curator insight, November 24, 2013 3:18 PM

A great community idea to encourage your neighbourhood to read.

Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, November 24, 2013 10:30 PM

I will be setting up my little library soon!

Tricia Adams's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:07 AM

Lovely idea

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Så fick hon killarna att börja läsa

Så fick hon killarna att börja läsa | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
Att läsa för livet, ­heter det ju. Men godnattsagostunden har krympt och forskning visar­ att pojkars läsförmåga har försämrats.
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A Library in Every Pocket - Google Drive

A Library in Every Pocket - Google Drive | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
See it on Scoop.it, via Uppdrag : Skolbibliotek

Via GwynethJones, Monica Ehrenstråle
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GwynethJones's curator insight, November 14, 2013 1:00 PM
Our Google Doc for our Pre-Conf
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Bibliotekspoddarna är här! | BiblFeed

Bibliotekspoddarna är här! | BiblFeed | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
RT @biblfeed: Nybloggat på Biblfeed.se: "Bibliotekspoddarna är här!" http://t.co/2HIZ2Bo2kh #biblfeed #podcast #bibliotek #bibliotekspodd
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Reading Rockets

Reading Rockets | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
Offers effective teaching strategies, activities, lessons, lesson plans, worksheets, exercises, skills, tests, assessments for reading comprehension, language arts, literacy, fluency, phonics and phonemic awareness for children, especially those...
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The Most Famous Author From Every State

The Most Famous Author From Every State | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
From California's John Steinbeck to Maine's Stephen King, here are the most famous authors from every state.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 9, 2013 9:51 AM

I actually debated whether or not to scoop this article. I've long been a bit skeptical about "Best _________" lists of any kind. But, this article doesn't claim these are the best authors, nor does it ignore the possibility that there are other authors of equal or better note. 

 

I was impressed that the article's author actually listed her criteria, giving the reader an opportunity to recognize the "lean" of the evaluative assessment. For example, I suppose "ubiquity, literal acclaim, and financial success" are appropriate criteria for determining fame, though they might not be the most appropriate criteria for evaluating quality. 

 

That's fair.

 

That gives me permission to scoop this article for its interest level. 

 

And it sent me off on a little side trip. As professional literature educators, we have come to recognize that there are titles that are considered the canon of great literature. Most literature taught in schools rely upon an assumption that these are (at least among) the very best of the best and therefore ought to be the at the heart of literary reading's "must teach" books. 

 

Of course there is open debate and continued conversation about the wisdom of sticking (more or less) to the "dead white guys" curriculum. This conversation is perhaps as prevalent in English Department meetings as is the topic of "Kids these days! They just don't read as much as they used to!"

 

And I could not help but wonder...

What if we ignored the fact that this article "picks a winning author" from each state and what if we ignored the fact that this article assigns the "winning authors" by state? Why? Because we all know that each state has many popular and great writers and because we know that it might be spurious reasoning to suggest that we can judge a state's citizens' intellectual level by the author who represents their literary reading choices. For example, Dan Brown is certainly famous. But, we really don't know where his work stands in popularity among the citizens of New Hampshire. We certainly know that Mark Twain and John Steinbeck were often much more popular outside of their home states than inside their home states. 

 

But, what if we simply took this article as a sample data-set of what "average people who DO READ" read?  That's AVERAGE readers, not just the "professional readers" who teach literary reading?

 

Why? Because our "clients" are not all destined to major in English. But they are all destined to make personal decisions about whether or not they will be lifelong readers. 

 

So, what might we cull from this article? Perhaps, we can concentrate on what these authors write about regardless of their reputations among scholars.What do they bring to the conversations about the human condition that is attractive to large portions of the GENERAL population? They are "selling" reading to an impressive cross-section of the population whether it be local, national, or international. 

 

There are those who consider the likes of Stephen King and Dan Brown  "B-List" writers. But, whether or not one is presumptuous enough to offer "better writers than those guys," they are at their essence writing stories containing the very same themes about the nature of the human condition as those on the  assumed "A-List." And, they are reaching millions of people while raising the same esstential questions that we hope all well educated people choose to ponder.

 

What do the most popular writers write about?

 

What do they offer the GENERAL reading populace that many of the "A-list" authors" do not, or perhaps I should say, do not any longer offer to the AVERAGE reading populace? 

 

Perhaps, they are tapping into new forms of engaging contemporary readers as the "A-listers" were able to do in other times and continue to do "less broadly" as the distance between their times and their locations and their proximal relationships grows further from the zones of proximal development grows.

 

Perhaps the order of importance in selecting literature ought to be:

 

Above all else, sell them reading.. 

Then sell them the idea of wanting to read better stories.

Then sell them the idea of wanting to read the best.

 

The concept of The perfect being the enemy of the good, most often attributed to Voltaire, might be worth considering. Certainly the best of the best literature is better than the pretty good. But, let us not forget that the pretty good may be reaching far more people far more successfully than the best of the best does.


 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal fictitious business name of GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

 

 

 

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Reading for fun improves children's brains, study confirms

Reading for fun improves children's brains, study confirms | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
A study of 17,000 people from birth indicates that reading for pleasure improves not just literacy, but maths ability too, writes Alice Sullivan
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