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Books for Boys that Aren't “Books for Boys” | The Hub

Books for Boys that Aren't “Books for Boys” | The Hub | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it

"I realized it doesn’t matter if a book is “for” a guy or a girl; the gender of the intended audience tends to get all mixed up when you factor in the power of a good story. Boys like stories; girls like stories. Readers in general like stories. We need to forget what we think about boys and reading and find them the stories they want."


Via Heather Stapleton, Elizabeth Hutchinson
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Elizabeth Hutchinson's curator insight, March 2, 1:18 AM

Interesting article about boys and reading. 

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Learning Literary Terms With Taylor Swift

Learning Literary Terms With Taylor Swift | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
This article was written by teen reporters from The Mash, a weekly publication distributed to Chicagoland high schools.

By Kiley Roache, Nazareth High School

Whether you’re prepping for the AP Literature exam, or trying to crank out that ...

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, February 17, 9:53 AM

17 February 2014

 

I can't say that I'm an expert on Taylor Swift lyrics. But, I have taken some teasing because I've found the lyrics to the few songs I've listened to, to be quite touching and poetic. 

 

In that limited experience, I was attracted to the storytelling aspect of her lyrics. They struck me as being as personal as quite thoughtful journal entries taken seriously by someone who cared and paid the price for doing so. Very touching.

 

And, now, thanks to Kiley Roache, of Nazareth High School, we have this article sharing several examples of the way Taylor Swift has used several literary devices in her lyrics.

 

If literary devices are intended to enhance the relationship between a writer's intent and the receptiveness of that writer's audience, then perhaps it might be significantly more effective to introduce  those literary devices via examples that really exist in the world of our students rather than only in the world of literary scholarship. That is, the power of literary devices may be more effectively "learned" when the focus is upon bringing the story to the reader rather than focusing upon bringing the reader to the device. 

 

Would I use this article in class. "Absolutely except..."

 

One lesson I learned long ago, is that too many students' have extremely rigid pre-established opinions about music types, genres, and performers to assume that sharing any musician's lyrics will be a welcome endeavor by all.

 

Seems obvious doesn't it? Different students have different tastes in music and more typically than not, for the most part they have yet to develop a breadth of musical appreciation that allows them to be receptive to music beyond the breadth of "their favorite" kinds of music. 

 

As an aside, it might be worth considering how far beyond their established interest in storytelling and beyond their Vygotskian Zone of Proximal Development we ask them to be receptive to when we assign all of them to study the same work of literature. 

 

Perhaps if we took every opportunity to wrap literary reading learning experiences around the question every students asks, "What does this have to do with anything I care about?" we might find more of them receptive to the lessons we design in our attempt to address the question every professional educator asks, "How can I use literature to encourage students to contemplate  not only what they care about but what they ought to consider caring more about?"

 

Bait the hook! 

 

Fans of Taylor Swift will "bite" a lesson on literary devices built around this article because it begins with  an established appetite. They'll feel a closer and deeper attachment via their "fandomness" to her work and probably rush out to other fans to clue them into the depths of Swift's lyrics that they've discovered.

 

If this is true for Taylor Swift fans then a parallel experience is probably true for students who happen be fans of other musicians.

 

Building upon this premise, I might ask students to email me a phrase from a lyric that they are particularly fond of.

 

I would print each one on a single sheet of 8.5x11 white paper using Helvetica font in the largest point size that I could so that the phrase would still fit on the single sheet of paper. 

 

I wouldn't identify the source. (student or musician).

 

Before class the next day, I would hang them around the room with as much space between them as possible on walls where there was ample space to walk.

 

I would immediately invite students to walk around and read the phrases with one intent. What do you suppose it was about each phrase that "someone" in this class thought was particularly meaningful? 


I would emphasize that it isn't important whether or not they find the phrase particularly meaningful. The focus being simply what did the writer of the lyric do with words that caused at least one of his or her fans to really connect with the phrase.

 

Then, I'd introduce this article assuring students who do not "care for Taylor Swift" that they don't have to watch the videos if they can't bring themselves to do so. They need only concentrate upon the term and the example.

 

The subsequent task being, "Did you see examples of 'any' of these terms in the phrases the class brought in?

 

It wouldn't surprise me if the students discovered that the use of literary devices is fairly common and that regardless of musical taste, many of these devices find themselves being used across many musical genres.

 

If there is merit in this thesis, then perhaps letting non-Swift fans  start with their favorite lines from their favorite musicians regardless of the teacher's opinions (informed or otherwise) about those musicians and then letting them discover what it was about those lines that they found particularly interesting would serve as an equally engaging and more successful approach than say, teaching cliché, oops, I mean simile by telling them  about someone being "as hungry as a bear;" or, explaining the allusion being made in one story they are not enjoying to another story they never heard of.

 

And, I would also suspect that once they've had some experience noticing the use of literary devices in stories they already have a personal engagement with, that they would have enough "lock on the concept" to begin noticing them in the works on the official course reading list.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit

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The Things Librarians Find in Books

The Things Librarians Find in Books | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
I don't want to remain untouched by a book. Why should the book want to remain untouched by me?

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, February 1, 7:29 AM

1 February 2014

Yeah! Yeah! We've all heard about "thinking outside the box," a phrase so overused that too many now proudly use the phrase as though the phrase itself was their own stroke of outside the box thinking  and apply it lavishing to their own collection of inane parrotings.

 

So, maybe I'm the first to suggest, probably not, that this article is actually a welcome and thought provoking alternate take on what books are about.

 

Here's the comment I left at the end of the article (Don't hate me)...

 

"Love it!  


My new mantra! Let's hear in for "Thinking inside the book!"

 

As a teacher I used to provide my students with packets of the smallest multi-colored post-its so the could "write in the book AND at the same time bookmark the passages of particular meaning to them. Then I'd tell them to either remove them after they'd written their final paper. I'd also encourage them to consider writing in the book and then "losing it." But, I'd  also remind them (encourage them) that they would not be allowed to march in the graduation ceremony if they hadn't paid for lost books.

 

And, when I pointed out that there might be a relevant lesson to learn about love in The Velveteen Rabbit, I always got several grins from kids who just seemed to have issues not losing their books until the day I collected books; and they always handed me an envelope with the exact change in it to cover their "irresponsible act,"  lower their eyes and say "sorry." Then they'd raise their eyes, smile and wink at me. And, I'd simply put on a stern face, say, "I hope you've learned your lesson," smile and wink back.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED a 501C3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

 

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Engaging Boys in Literacy

"Boys need a sense of purpose in order to engage with what they do. Give them an audience, create real ‘wow’ moments and help develop a love of fiction. Gary Wilson explores some practical ways in which you can help to engage boys."


Via Heather Stapleton, Anu Ojaranta
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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, March 1, 2013 9:02 AM

Boys love book club!  Teaching wilderness skills by reading Swiss Family Robinson!  

Alison Hewett's curator insight, April 6, 2013 3:33 PM

Tips to help boys

Heather Stapleton's curator insight, October 14, 2013 3:34 AM

New link for this video is https://global.oup.com/education/searchresults?search_input=engaging+boys+in+literacy++video+&region=international#

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How To Read Faster Than You Ever Thought Possible

How To Read Faster Than You Ever Thought Possible | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
Soon you could read all 309 pages of "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" in under 77 minutes. Yes, you.

To get through it that quickly (a pace of 1,000 words a minute) you'll have to use an about-to-be released app and forgo the ide...

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, February 28, 9:49 AM

28 February 2014

I took an Evelyn Woods speed reading course some 40 years ago. I don't know if it was a result of my having inherited Strabismus (the fancy word for being cross-eyed) or not. but it sort of worked, for awhile anyway.

 

Though it could have been what I've come to know as symptoms associated with ADHD. I've always had a "wandering mind" which  in those days was generally wrapped in the indefensible "Jerome has trouble paying attention."

 

Ironically, I've come to the realization that although I always accepted the "wrongness" of my alternate attentiveness, it was and continues to be more of a "hyper attentiveness." A teacher might say something in passing that caught my attention in such a way that I'd lock onto the comment and automatically start thinking about it and rolling the idea around in my mind sort of like a little kid intrigued by a rolly polly bug. Time would "stop" as I simply tinkered with whatever it was that I had found intriguing and then where ever it was that that intrigue took me. 

 

And then, usually, moments or minutes later in the back of my consciousness a sort of "distant echoey sound" snapped me out of that pleasant mental meandering.

 

"Jerome! are you paying attention!" and I'd shake my head In a fashion very similar to the way kids try to shake the sleepy bugs out of their minds upon first awakening from a pleasant dream and realize that for however long the contemplation had been, it had been wrapped in a body that appeared to be sitting in some sort of glazed posture appearing to be staring out of the window.instead of "sitting up straight and concentrating on what the teacher was saying as I should have been."

 

I was a reader early on. My parents attempted to be diligent about what I wasn't allowed to read (aka comic books). it wasn't confrontational. I accepted their judgment, but did enjoy reading my friends' comic books when the chance arose. 

 

I was a "good"  reader, but a slow reader. The family had driven the 20 mile round trip to the library  once or twice a week  for as long as I could remember. I'd come home with as many as six or seven chapter books and be eager to decide which one I'd start first. Yet I was a slow reader, not hesitant; not reluctant, not struggling. Just slow as in eating a delicious meal slowly to postpone the inevitability of sooner or later reaching the last bite of a good meal or a delicious story.

 

The only pacing guide in my personal reading was the "DUE DATE" card the library placed in checked out books. But even that did not force me to read fast as I was perfectly aware of the fact that any book I'd checked out but not gotten around to reading could simply be re-checked out on our next trip to the library. 

 

Eventually the pressure at school to "get through" the reading assignment, engaging or not, led me to the discovery of skimming, and in history, now a favorite subject but not so much then, to discovering that reading the bold text and first sentence following the bold text was generally sufficient to be able to appear as though I'd read the assignment during the next day's class discussion.

 

And, though I never shared it with friends, I knew this was "cheating" so I would often make the attempt to "really do the reading." And, I kept it a secret that I would often find myself in the middle of a paragraph realizing that though I had actually read every page to that point, that I would "wake up" in much the same fashion as I had when a teacher snapped me out of my "staring out the window" days in earlier grades, and I'd realize that I had read, but in some bizarre way also not paid any attention to what I was reading. I'd re-read the paragraph and wonder what it was about and find myself flipping backwards in pages looking for the last thing I remembered having read. Sometimes it was several pages. 

 

It wasn't until much later that I discovered that this is not an uncommon phenomenon among my students.

 

You may have suspected for awhile, that this blog itself seems to only have a distant connection to the scooped article. But, that's sort of how it has always been. Reading "A" does not always lead to reading "B" then "C" and so on. Reading "A" often leads to discovering some sort of connection in an interest in thinking about "B" and "infinity" and "$%$#^"  and a "vacation memory." 

 

So, back to the article. we've all contemplated the distinctions between paper-based reading and digital reading. My position has been to suggest that this is a false issue in many ways and the tug-o-war between the opposing proponents can be much more harmful than helpful. 

 

As I read this article, being fairly-pro technology, my mind began meandering around the "other" reading issues.

 

Would this be good for getting through important reading when time is short and important reading is much and a must?

 

Would this be good for keeping up with pacing guides accepted as being by default a good thing whether or not they also have a down side?

 

Would this be good when broad attentiveness to important and trivial issues and trends of the day "require" that we live faster even if that causes us to read less deeply? 

 

Would this allow us to attend to more (as in quantity) important issues than we might have been able to attend to in the past?

 

And, what about the "slow movement" ( see this TED Talk: http://www.ted.com/talks/carl_honore_praises_slowness.html: and this website: http://www.slowmovement.com that has become a counter movement to today's faster and faster "self=imposed pacing guide requirements that we often feel necessary for a successful life?

 

There is without a (current) doubt,  a need to get more done and to clear one's obligation plate more efficiently. We can not expect to live successfully in the 21st century without getting more accomplished more often on more fronts.

 

Yet there is also a need to allow more time to discover, to appreciate, to marinate in contemplation and consideration. 

 

So I'm neither condemning nor endorsing the technological "advance" offered by this article.

 

But, I'd like to turn this comment into a rhetorical or real request.

 

I have to assume that the length of this comment probably triggered at least a few immediate "Interesting maybe, but I don't have time to read this comment" abandonments; some immediate; others somewhere into the comments.

 

So I'm placing this request at the end of the article as a data/opinion collection effort.

 

If you choose to accept the requests, please leave a comment regarding...

 

REQUEST ONE: What benefits and drawbacks might there be in using this technology in education, particularly in the area of effective efforts to meet "the standards"?

 

REQUEST TWO: Try to go out of your way, now or very soon to watch the TED Talk linked to above.It is nineteen minutes long, but well worth watching.

 

By the way, if you haven't discovered this yet. TED Talks not only can show the transcript (think Informational Reading!) but while reading the transcript, clicking on any phrase automatically jumps to that point in the video above.

 

Now, I'll probably get back to the ton of work I was supposed to get done today because I didn't get it done yesterday, knowing full well that I'll probably be checking the Facebook, Scoop-it, Twitter, and LinkedIn sites where links to this post have been published  every 5 minutes or so just to see if there are any comments!

 

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

Jim Harmon's comment, March 3, 6:01 PM
I think, or maybe I hope, that technology like this helps the struggling readers in a way that supports what we like to believe about technology in education, but sometimes don't always have more than a feeling to go on.
Rescooped by Margareta from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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The Things Librarians Find in Books

The Things Librarians Find in Books | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
I don't want to remain untouched by a book. Why should the book want to remain untouched by me?

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, February 1, 7:29 AM

1 February 2014

Yeah! Yeah! We've all heard about "thinking outside the box," a phrase so overused that too many now proudly use the phrase as though the phrase itself was their own stroke of outside the box thinking  and apply it lavishing to their own collection of inane parrotings.

 

So, maybe I'm the first to suggest, probably not, that this article is actually a welcome and thought provoking alternate take on what books are about.

 

Here's the comment I left at the end of the article (Don't hate me)...

 

"Love it!  


My new mantra! Let's hear in for "Thinking inside the book!"

 

As a teacher I used to provide my students with packets of the smallest multi-colored post-its so the could "write in the book AND at the same time bookmark the passages of particular meaning to them. Then I'd tell them to either remove them after they'd written their final paper. I'd also encourage them to consider writing in the book and then "losing it." But, I'd  also remind them (encourage them) that they would not be allowed to march in the graduation ceremony if they hadn't paid for lost books.

 

And, when I pointed out that there might be a relevant lesson to learn about love in The Velveteen Rabbit, I always got several grins from kids who just seemed to have issues not losing their books until the day I collected books; and they always handed me an envelope with the exact change in it to cover their "irresponsible act,"  lower their eyes and say "sorry." Then they'd raise their eyes, smile and wink at me. And, I'd simply put on a stern face, say, "I hope you've learned your lesson," smile and wink back.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED a 501C3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

 

Rescooped by Margareta from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, January 13, 2:36 PM

Google Lit Trips is proud to announce the addition of the . This Lit Trip was co-developed by Library Media Specialist Anne Brusca, who is also the developer of the popular Google Lit Trip for A Family Apart by Joan Lowery Nixon as well as the Google Lit Trip for Flesh & Blood So Cheap by Albert Marrin and Google Lit Trip founder, Jerome Burg.

 

This Google Lit Trip includes several placemarks mentioned in the diary including placemarks for:

 

Anne Frank's Birthplace containing a link to an interactive Timeline for the Frank family. The Timeline is rich in embedded media related to the Frank family from 1914 through 2012.

 

Anne Frank's Home: Where the Frank family lived prior to moving to the Secret Annex. Flying to this placemark goes directly into Google Earth Streetview" where students can see the very place where the family lived as it looks today. This placemark contains a link to the only known video footage of Anne Frank. Students will see the very window in Street View from which Anne appears in the video.

 

Anne's father's business commonly referred to as the "Anne Frank" Building: This placemark includes an historical aerial photograph with the building in which Otto' Frank's business was located tinted blue. It is easy to see that the Annex which is behind the blue tinted building is not visible from the street.

 

The Secret Annex: This placemark shifts the view to a bird's eye view showing the secret annex behind the street-side building and contains a link to a virtual walk-through tour of the entire Secret Annex. 

 

The Westerbrook Transit Camp: This placemark contains an image of the very hut in which the Frank family stayed while at the Westerbork Transit Camp. It also contains a link to a short video about the the memorial now located on the grounds of the Westerbork Transit Camp and a link to an exquisite photo slide show capturing the "feeling" of the place today as it has been set-aside to remember those who passed through this camp on their way to the unimaginable destinies that lay ahead for them.

 

Auschwitz Concentration Camp: This placemark contains a link to a 2 minute video about a photo book that presents,  "... 31 historical photographs taken by SS men in 1944 depicting the extermination of Jews in the Auschwitz II-Birkenau camp. They were set in contrast with present-day photographs of the same locations...." There is also a link to a website with more information about the Auschwitz Concentration Camp.

 

Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp: This placemark marks the spot in the desolate area where the Bergen-Belsen Concentration once was and where Anne and her sister died.

 

Lest We Forget: This placemark is provides a view of the Yad Vashem 

The Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority
Jerusalem Israel. It also has links to other Holocaust Museums with interactive exhibits and other educational resources.

 

Those educators responsible for addressing Common Core State Standards for both literary reading and Informational reading and particularly those interested in cross-curricular studies will find this a valueable addition to: your students' learning experiences.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal Fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit.

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Vintage Ads for Libraries and Reading

Vintage Ads for Libraries and Reading | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it

Curating eclectic interestingness from culture's collective brain...some vintage ads and posters for all books. Delightfully colorful and brimming with endearingly bad copywriting, these mid-century gems will bring back memories.


Via Karen Bonanno, Lourense Das
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