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Free, High-Quality AudioBooks of Classic Literature on Spotify

Free, High-Quality AudioBooks of Classic Literature on Spotify | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
Where music goes, technologically speaking, audio books soon follow. We've had audio books on vinyl LP, on cassette tape, on CD, and on MP3, just like we've had music.

Via Shona Whyte, Evdokia Roka
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Shona Whyte's curator insight, February 8, 2015 9:33 AM

Listening resources for learning and teachers

Roselink's curator insight, March 12, 2016 5:37 AM

Listening resources for learning and teachers

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What Books Do for the Human Soul: The Four Psychological Functions of Great Literature

What Books Do for the Human Soul: The Four Psychological Functions of Great Literature | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
"Writers open our hearts and minds, and give us maps to our own selves."

The question of what reading does for the human soul is an etern

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, December 19, 2014 9:16 AM

19 December 2014

 

Love Literature? You'll LOVE this. The video is great. So many memorable phrases capturing the essence of the value of literature. 

 

A couple of favorites...

"It looks like it’s wasting time, but literature is actually the ultimate time-saver — because it gives us access to a range of emotions and events that it would take you years, decades, millennia to try to experience directly."

 

"...they (writers) make us sympathetic to ideas and feelings that are of deep importance but can’t afford airtime in a commercialized, status-conscious, and cynical world."

 

"In the best books, it’s as if the writer knows us better than we know ourselves — they find the words to describe the fragile, weird, special experiences of our inner lives… Writers open our hearts and minds, and give us maps to our own selves,..."

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit

 

Like what we're doing? You can support us for less than the tip you'd leave at lunch today.  http://ebay.to/11vhysK

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Big Changes Coming to Google Lit Trips!

Big Changes Coming to Google Lit Trips! | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it

Very Important Information for ALL Google Lit Trips Users!


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 20, 2014 4:54 PM

20 September 2014

 The good news that I can share is that a completely redesigned and updated website is under development. The anticipated transition date is still undetermined.

 

In preparation for the transition to the new site, we will be revising ALL existing Google Lit Trips over the next several weeks to reflect changes we are making in our media storage location. We will be posting those revisions on the existing site as they are completed so that those using these titles can update to the new versions as soon as they are available.

 

It is IMPORTANT to know that the media in previous versions of existing Google Lit Trips may cease to work properly once the new site is published.

 

You can check the existing website to see an updated list of the new versions as they are published.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 20, 2014 5:03 PM

20 September 2014

 The good news that I can share is that a completely redesigned and updated website is under development. The anticipated transition date is still undetermined.

 

In preparation for the transition to the new site, we will be revising ALL existing Google Lit Trips over the next several weeks to reflect changes we are making in our media storage location. We will be posting those revisions on the existing site as they are completed so that those using these titles can update to the new versions as soon as they are available.

 

It is IMPORTANT to know that the media in previous versions of existing Google Lit Trips may cease to work properly once the new site is published.

 

You can check the existing website to see an updated list of the new versions as they are published.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

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We're Teaching Books That Don't Stack Up

We're Teaching Books That Don't Stack Up | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
All too often it's English teachers who close down teen interest in reading.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, January 24, 2014 3:36 PM

24 January 2014

 (This scooped article was orignally published in 2008)

 

Okay, Gulp!

 

I think I'll begin my comments with one of my favorite Dick Cavett quotes....

 

__________

It's a rare person who wants to hear what he doesn't want to hear.

__________

 

There, I said it. Literature teachers, we may just be a big part of the problem, well intended as we may be.

 

If you don't read the scooped article, or finish my brief comments, I'll include one paragragh from the article worthy of some open-minded collegial contemplation in a pending department meeting...

 

__________

""Butchering." That's what one of my former students, a young man who loves creative writing but rarely gets to do any at school, called English class. He was referring to the endless picking apart of linguistic details that loses teens in a haze of "So what?" The reading quizzes that turn, say, "Hamlet" into a Q&A on facts, symbols and themes. The thesis-driven essay assignments that require students to write about a novel they can't muster any passion for ("The Scarlet Letter" is high on teens' list of most dreaded). I'll never forget what one parent, bemoaning his daughter's aversion to great books after she took AP English Literature, wrote to me: "What I've seen teachers do is take living, breathing works of art and transform them into dessicated lab specimens fit for dissection."

__________

 

(awkward pause)

 

 

 

Yes, we do need to sow the seeds of the next crop of English majors. But, we ought to consider it even more important, since the numbers are so lopsided, to remember that as many as 90% of our students "ain't gonna major in English" and perhaps as many as 50% of our students "ain't gonna read a single piece of fiction" after they are no longer required to do so.

 

I know.

 

I don't particularly want to hear it either.  But "facts is facts." And, if there is any truth in the contentions made in this article that in too many cases we may be killing what we believe we are nourishing we may want to revisit even our own personal favorite lessons.

 

I am not proposing that we "dumb down" but rather that we give some thought to how we might "relevance up" what we do in our literary reading instruction. Anyone who can't imagine how to "relevance up" say a play like Cyrano deBergerac, must surely have forgotten what it felt like to have acne or the intensity of the forces of physical attractivenss at a time in one's life when "inner beauty" is just something that teens' parents say is really important while correcting their children's posture.

 

Yes, of course! That's it. Our students don't particularly want to hear what they don't want to hear either. But, we're the grown ups in the room aren't we? 

 

Of course if taken as a blanket condemnation of how we teach literary reading, then it is a harsh and unfair implication to suggest that none of us do manage to successfully engage the vast majority of our students. But, if we are willing to listen and hear what we may not really want to hear, we may give some readjusted attention to the complaints of those who are brave or annoyed enough to express those complaints. And, if we really do want to hear what we really don't want to hear, then we might also spend significant time listening to the eerie silience of those who "lay low" only pretending to care or to those silent ones who don't even bother to pretend to care while wondering why the clock moves so slowly.

 

We can sometimes too easily explain away the complaints and disengaged silence by believing that "they're just lazy, they spend too much time on facebook, they just don't care, that they just want less challenging work." There certainly are those. But a surprising number of the disengaged don't want less; they want "something" more.

 

It was not too long ago that the battle cry was, "No Child Left Behind!" But, I would propose that perhaps an equally important concern is that when we finish with them, that they do not ride off "into the real world" happy to be finally free to leave some of their teachers behind.

 

Teach to their hearts and their minds will follow.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the fictitious business name for GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit

 

Shay Davidson's curator insight, January 24, 2014 8:47 PM

Interesting. I'm quite sure people could argue all day about the books kids are forced to read in high school. I only wish that good teachers had a choice in the books they wanted to present to students--and I'd get to pick the good teachers out!

Steffen Sipe's curator insight, January 30, 2014 3:45 AM

sorry....

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25 Christmas presents for booklovers | Scottish Book Trust

25 Christmas presents for booklovers | Scottish Book Trust | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it

Christmas? Hanukkah? Three Birthdays? Anniversary? They're all coming up in the last two weeks of December around my house.

 

Even if you're "only celebrating Christmas" here are some totally great literary presents booklovers will love you for!


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, December 19, 2014 10:04 AM

19 December 2014

 

I always love checking out these sites. 

 

How cool would a teacher be wearing gift #19?

 

I so wish gift #12 had crossed my path...so many times in the past! 

 

One of my all time favorite gifts was the Huck Finn version of gift #23 that my daughter and son-in-law gave me a couple of years ago.

 

And what's really cool is each of the 25 suggestions links to a different site bursting with other literary gift ideas.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED, an educational nonprofit.

 

Like what we're doing? You can support us for less than the tip you'd leave at lunch today.  http://ebay.to/11vhysK

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17 Writers On The Importance Of Reading

17 Writers On The Importance Of Reading | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
"Never trust anyone who has not brought a book with them." —Lemony Snicket

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, November 7, 2014 6:07 PM

7 November 2014

 

Oh what a delicious collection of quotes delivered to the mind's table with exquisite presentation.

 

These quotes are large enough to download and share with students. 

 

OR... to have students peruse in search of the single quote that most appeals to them.

 

A tip... tell the kids they can only pick ONE to call their favorite. Why? because it's easy to toss those without appeal. But extremely difficult to toss those with tremendous appeal. 

 

Just tell them the rules are they can ONLY pick one. Why? Because when forced to choose between two quotes (or maybe even three) they are forced into a sort of contemplative mode where they really have to weigh the reasons why both (or each) has such a strong appeal. 

 

And, in doing so, they will leave with an enhanced appreciation for all of the best ones. Rather than merely crossing out all but one and then not really exploring the source of any of the quote's attraction for them.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED an educational nonprofit.

"We appreciate your tax-deductible donations!"

Chéri Vausé's curator insight, November 10, 2014 6:08 PM

Reading is essential to writers, and not just for doing research. You can become hackneyed, in a rut, write in directionless formulas if you don't keep up and read someone else's style of prose. Authors, therefore, should read more than readers. Yes, that is exactly what I said. You will never grow as a writer if you don't read. As for reading junk, keep it to a minimum, for that could also keep you from reaching higher with your prose, from challenging you to writer better and better.

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Travel the (Google Maps) World with Literary Characters!

Travel the (Google Maps) World with Literary Characters! | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it
If you're looking for a way to incorporate STEM concepts and Common Core concepts into your k-12 fiction lesson, look no further. Our Research and Instruction Librarian, Kim Miller, found an excell...

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, September 18, 2014 1:52 PM

29 July 2014

 

Short and sweet but always an honor to be recognized favorably by University Librarians and Colleges of Education.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.org ~

brought to you by GLT Global ED aka Google Lit Trips, an educational nonprofit

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The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank | Skolbiblioteket och lärande | Scoop.it

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, January 13, 2014 5:36 PM

Google Lit Trips is proud to announce the addition of the . This Lit Trip was co-developed by Library Media Specialist Anne Brusca, who is also the developer of the popular Google Lit Trip for A Family Apart by Joan Lowery Nixon as well as the Google Lit Trip for Flesh & Blood So Cheap by Albert Marrin and Google Lit Trip founder, Jerome Burg.

 

This Google Lit Trip includes several placemarks mentioned in the diary including placemarks for:

 

Anne Frank's Birthplace containing a link to an interactive Timeline for the Frank family. The Timeline is rich in embedded media related to the Frank family from 1914 through 2012.

 

Anne Frank's Home: Where the Frank family lived prior to moving to the Secret Annex. Flying to this placemark goes directly into Google Earth Streetview" where students can see the very place where the family lived as it looks today. This placemark contains a link to the only known video footage of Anne Frank. Students will see the very window in Street View from which Anne appears in the video.

 

Anne's father's business commonly referred to as the "Anne Frank" Building: This placemark includes an historical aerial photograph with the building in which Otto' Frank's business was located tinted blue. It is easy to see that the Annex which is behind the blue tinted building is not visible from the street.

 

The Secret Annex: This placemark shifts the view to a bird's eye view showing the secret annex behind the street-side building and contains a link to a virtual walk-through tour of the entire Secret Annex. 

 

The Westerbrook Transit Camp: This placemark contains an image of the very hut in which the Frank family stayed while at the Westerbork Transit Camp. It also contains a link to a short video about the the memorial now located on the grounds of the Westerbork Transit Camp and a link to an exquisite photo slide show capturing the "feeling" of the place today as it has been set-aside to remember those who passed through this camp on their way to the unimaginable destinies that lay ahead for them.

 

Auschwitz Concentration Camp: This placemark contains a link to a 2 minute video about a photo book that presents,  "... 31 historical photographs taken by SS men in 1944 depicting the extermination of Jews in the Auschwitz II-Birkenau camp. They were set in contrast with present-day photographs of the same locations...." There is also a link to a website with more information about the Auschwitz Concentration Camp.

 

Bergen-Belsen Concentration Camp: This placemark marks the spot in the desolate area where the Bergen-Belsen Concentration once was and where Anne and her sister died.

 

Lest We Forget: This placemark is provides a view of the Yad Vashem 

The Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority
Jerusalem Israel. It also has links to other Holocaust Museums with interactive exhibits and other educational resources.

 

Those educators responsible for addressing Common Core State Standards for both literary reading and Informational reading and particularly those interested in cross-curricular studies will find this a valueable addition to: your students' learning experiences.

 

 ~ www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Google Lit Trips is the legal Fictitious business name of GLT Global ED, a 501c3 tax-exempt educational nonprofit.