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Best of 2013: 7 Ways Imagination Ruled the World | Best Of on GOOD

Best of 2013: 7 Ways Imagination Ruled the World  | Best Of on GOOD | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

This year, conversations about creativity and innovation have been happening all over the world. And while there's still a long way to go, we're excited to see just how many schools and communities are embracing the importance of letting a child’s imagination run wild.

Sharla Shults's insight:

Imagination leads to creativity and what better imagination than that of a child!

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Video: The Making of the World’s Smallest Video | Technology on GOOD

Video: The Making of the World’s Smallest Video | Technology on GOOD | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

Scientists have developed tools to investigate the mysteries of our universe as never before, whether using high powered telescopes to peer at galaxies beyond our own, or specially designed microscopes to pinpoint the millions of molecules on the tip of your finger. From the furthest reaches of space to the tiniest particles on Earth, scientists are pioneering ways to see our world in entirely new ways. In this spirit of discovery, the IBM atomic memory research team have been exploring the limits and capabilities of how atoms—the building blocks of everything on Earth—can be used in unexpected ways. As they study how these tiny particles might be used for storing immense amounts of data in computation and information storage, they decided to make a movie created with atoms—a challenging, never attempted feat to painstakingly move thousands of individual atoms—to show what can be possible in atomic research.

Sharla Shults's insight:

The IBM team created what’s now known as the world’s smallest movie, A Boy and His Atom, which was made by magnifying atoms 100 million times through a scanning tunneling microscope.

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Could This Reimagined Traveling Carnival Get Kids Hooked on Science? | Technology on GOOD

Could This Reimagined Traveling Carnival Get Kids Hooked on Science?  | Technology on GOOD | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
 When we were kids my brother Tyler and I played A LOT of video games. Our dad was in the game business and would bring home all the latest consoles and accessories.
Sharla Shults's insight:

Sadly, too few kids today grow up in the type of supportive, creative environment that nurtured us. And the consequences are staggering.

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Scientists find more precise way to turn off genes, a major goal of treatments that target cancer

Scientists find more precise way to turn off genes, a major goal of treatments that target cancer | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
Scientists have found a more precise way to turn off genes, a finding that will speed research discoveries and biotech advances and may eventually prove useful in reprogramming cells to regenerate organs and tissues.

Via Kenneth Weene
Sharla Shults's insight:

 "The idea is to reprogram cells to do the things we want them to do," Lim said. "We are still unlocking the secrets of the genome to harness the power of cellular reprogramming."

 

WOW! Reprogramming cells for regenerative medicine - Sounds like something out of a SyFy movie!

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Kenneth Weene's curator insight, March 8, 2013 7:28 AM

A very promising bit of science news.

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Firefly Watch Update - Museum of Science

Firefly Watch Update - Museum of Science | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

Firefly Watch wishes you all a happy new year and a warm welcome to our sixth year of counting and learning about fireflies. In our first five years, 3,644 volunteers from 41 US states and 6 Canadian provinces have participated in the project. Thanks to all of you, Firefly Watch has been a greater success than we could have ever imagined. 

Now is the time to prepare for the upcoming year. Although for some of you this may seem too soon to think about counting fireflies, firefly season is fast approaching in some locales--the earliest sighting recorded by one of our volunteers was February 13 in Louisiana! Check out our updated Firefly Sightings chart to discover when the first sightings in your state have previously occurred. The chart includes first and last date seen, number of habitats reporting, and number of observations entered. This chart will give you some idea of when to start tracking fireflies in your area.

Don Salvatore
Museum of Science

Photo of winter firefly by Don Salvatore

 

AQUATIC FIREFLIES

Even though fireflies are generally found near moist environments, they are not considered aquatic insects. However, the larvae of some firefly species have adopted an aquatic or semi-aquatic lifestyle. These larvae live either in the water, breathing the air trapped between the leaves of water plants, or on aquatic or semi-aquatic plants, hunting for snails. 

Ethan Bright, at the University of Michigan, has compiled a list of the aquatic fireflies in the state of Michigan and would welcome hearing from anyone who has site records for the fireflies on his list. The list and contact information for Ethan can be seen on the Discussion Board.

 

 


Via Marilyn Armstrong
Sharla Shults's insight:

I have not see fireflys since a child. A memory long passed but not forgotten!

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Marilyn Armstrong's curator insight, February 21, 2013 6:27 AM

I miss the fireflies. I few years ago, I noticed that there were very few fireflies anymore. There used to be millions lighting up the evening. So I started looking around and discovered I was right. The fireflies are in trouble. I've been following them ever since. This is the Firefly Watch newsletter from the Museum of Science. You can join too.

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Russian Meteorite Wounds Hundreds!

Russian Meteorite Wounds Hundreds! | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

The image dipicts the moment a meteorite exploded in the sky above a  Russian town. The terrifying meteorite shower left more than 950 people injured, buildings devastated and the mobile network wiped out when it hit Russia this morning.

 

No reports of fatalities thus far.

 

SOURCE

Large object flashed across the sky at 9.20am local time Pictures show a streak of smoke followed by several bright blasts of flames82 of the injured are children and two are in intensive careLanded in a lake near Chebarkul, a neighbouring town 6,000 square feet of a roof at a zinc factory collapsed One local said it ‘was like a scene from the Armageddon movie’Same day as Asteroid 2012 DA14, which is due to skim Earth’s orbit tonight
Sharla Shults's insight:

At first glance it may seem more than a coincidence that this meteorite shower has struck Earth just hours before asteroid 2012 DA14 is due to skim past our planet tonight. Yet astronomers say that a coincidence is all it is.

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Watch the Single Drip Scientists Have Been Waiting to See For Decades

Watch the Single Drip Scientists Have Been Waiting to See For Decades | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
Science lovers are aflutter today over the above video, which may not look like much—OK, definitely doesn't look like much—until I tell you some people have been waiting for the better part of a century to lay eyes on the long-elusive "pitch drop"...

Via Kenneth Weene
Sharla Shults's insight:

OK science geeks, you will love this one!

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Kenneth Weene's curator insight, July 19, 2013 10:23 AM

My moment of gink-atude for today.

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Permission to Play: Let's Make Fixing Things Cool Again | Living on GOOD

Permission to Play: Let's Make Fixing Things Cool Again | Living on GOOD | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
Yellowed kitchen appliances, dust-streaked radios, unresponsive DVD players: the table was strewn with stuff that even a local thrift store’s discounts couldn’t make enticing.
Sharla Shults's insight:

Kids are born tinkerers. Children are curious. Ignite their curiosity and allow them to tinker!

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This Mobile

This Mobile | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
This Mobile 'Think Tank' Will Give Science Experiments Street Cred
Sharla Shults's insight:

If you're a STEM advocate, brain geek, or supporter of experiential education, please share and donate to our fundraiser page before the March 13 deadline.

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How Much Stuff is Out There in the Universe (Interactive Infographic) | Geeky Stuffs

How Much Stuff is Out There in the Universe (Interactive Infographic) | Geeky Stuffs | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

When people read about the universe, they often have trouble visualizing just how big it truly is. When thinking on the scale of atoms, the size of the universe is unimaginably large.

A single drop of water contains over 1.5 sextillion atoms, and there are approximately 75 sextillion drops of water in the ocean. While the ocean covers nearly 70 percent of the Earth's surface, water only represents a small fraction of the Earth's weight. Over 1,300 Earths could fit inside Jupiter, and the Sun could hold nearly 1,000 Jupiter-sized planets.

Sharla Shults's insight:

The universe sizzles! Have you ever really thought about how huge is this universe? The interactive infographic puts you there...right in the midst of the ObservABLE Universe vs. the ObservED Universe.

 

Here is an interesting tidbit from the infographic: If you lined up every pixel contained in 14.66 BILLION copies of this infographic, the length you would create would represent The Observable Universe's diameter and ONE PIXEL would represent our solar system's. That's all.

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Green Ninja: A Smokey the Bear for Climate Change

Green Ninja: A Smokey the Bear for Climate Change | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
Green Ninja: A Smokey the Bear for Climate Change

 

Wouldn’t it be nice to have your own superhero to reduce the global carbon footprint? Enter the Green Ninja, a climate action superhero who fights global warming through education and social change.

We all know the importance of reducing emissions of heat-trapping gases to help stabilize our climate system. In 2012, the U.S. experienced a number of significant weather and climate events including the warmest year on record, a drought that peaked in July with over 60 percent of the nation in drought conditions, and devastating storms including Super Storm Sandy. Together with another record-setting minimum in Arctic sea ice, policy makers have again been forced to take climate change seriously.

So what is the way forward and could the Green Ninja help?

Sharla Shults's insight:

The Green Ninja Project is a collaboration among scientists, educators, and artists to create unique educational experiences that inspire young people to take action on climate change.

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Why Carbon Footprints Matter: What I Learned from my Hyper-Detailed Calculations

Why Carbon Footprints Matter: What I Learned from my Hyper-Detailed Calculations | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

A few years ago, I decided to figure out my exact personal carbon footprint—from every glass of wine, to a new pair of underwear, what impact I was having on the world. I thought I was probably doing a decent job; I was already running a renewable energy company, commuting by bike, and aware of energy issues. But the picture was pretty grim.

 

People have called me anally-retentive and obsessive-compulsive, and that's true. This is my life in excruciating detail, converted to the basic unit of watts so everything could easily be compared.

 

Sharla Shults's insight:

Technical? yes Informative? yes Interesting? yes Do I understand my own? no Will I endeavor to find out? Probably not

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