Sizzlin' News
Follow
Find tag "life"
1.5K views | +10 today
Sizzlin' News
Hot off the Press Void of Politics, Sadness and Violence: Hello, out there, rescoop the HOT news!
Curated by Sharla Shults
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sharla Shults from The Social Media Times
Scoop.it!

Find out how much time you've spent/wasted on Facebook in the last ten years - Metro

Find out how much time you've spent/wasted on Facebook in the last ten years - Metro | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
Metro Find out how much time you've spent/wasted on Facebook in the last ten years Metro The Facebook Time Machine, from Time magazine, runs through a user's timestamps on posts until it reaches the earliest one, so it does not include time spent...

Via Manlio Mannozzi, robosheauk
Sharla Shults's insight:

This is a totally awesome tool! When I equated by daily time on facebook, my first thought was I am so glad I am NOT wasting my life away on Facebook! Yippee! THEN, I did some additional calculating to only find that since joining facebook in 2012 my average time is 16.994 min per day. That is the baseline for the figures above! Facebook, you just may have to go bye-bye! Life is too short and time too precious to wile it away for who knows what purpose!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharla Shults
Scoop.it!

25,000 Mornings: 8 Ways to Improve Your Morning Routine | Health on GOOD

25,000 Mornings: 8 Ways to Improve Your Morning Routine | Health on GOOD | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
You’ll wake up for about 25,000 mornings in your adult life, give or take a few. According to a report from the World Health Organization, the average life expectancy in the United States is 79 years.
Sharla Shults's insight:

"That’s what you get in your adult life. 25,000 times you get to open your eyes, face the day, and decide what to do next. I don’t know about you, but I’ve let a lot of those mornings slip by."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharla Shults
Scoop.it!

5 Items That Should Be on Everyone's Bucket List

5 Items That Should Be on Everyone's Bucket List | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

Everybody has personal goals that they want to accomplish in their lifetime. A "bucket list" is a great way to write all of your goals down on a sheet of paper.  Now skydiving is an example of a bucket list item someone may have, but thanks to this re-posted blog by Deborah Fike (www.thechangeblog.com), she gives us five items that should be on everyone's bucket list.

Sharla Shults's insight:

Instead of a 'bucket' list, DESIRE list sounds much better! When you think about such a list, aren't the things included truly that which is desired but not yet achieved?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharla Shults from In and About the News
Scoop.it!

Customer Disservice: A Multi-Act Comedy

Customer Disservice: A Multi-Act Comedy | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

It took me five months to get a new oncologist from Fallon, the HMO that runs my Medicare Advantage plan. It began last November when, in a necessary cost-cutting move, I gave up my Medigap policy and signed on with Fallon Senior Medicare Advantage plan.

 

To get started on the wrong foot, the customer service person who signed me up gave me incorrect information. She had assured me Dana-Farber in Milford was covered by Fallon. This turned out to be untrue and left me without an oncologist. I was annoyed, but not wildly upset. They said I could see my Dana-Farber oncologist once more and I figured I’d get a referral from him.

 

That turned out to be overly optimistic. My oncologist didn’t know anyone at UMass in Worcester — Fallon’s only cancer care facility in Worcester County. Like many satellite facilities  for larger institutions, it’s hard for them to keep ambitious young doctors on staff. They stay a while, then move to better paying jobs at bigger more, prestigious hospitals. A few doctors stay, usually those who live locally, but most move on. It’s a bit of a revolving door, personnel-wise, though it really isn’t their fault.

 

Even this didn’t faze me. I’m past surgery and chemo. I’m in the maintenance phase. I go for checkups and blood tests. Once a year they scan me to make sure nothing is growing someplace it shouldn’t. Nonetheless, I’m only 2 years from the initial discovery of two separate tumors and there have been a lot of cancer deaths in my family. Mother. Brother. Both maternal grandparents and I’ve had cancer twice, so there’s no reason to assume I’ll ever be entirely safe. I’m not acting crazy because I feel it’s a bit soon to stop monitoring me.

 

My doctor assured me that the facility is good, but he couldn’t help me find a new doctor. He suggested I call the HMO and ask them who do they have in medical oncology with a speciality in breast cancer.  I already knew my PCP couldn’t give me a referral because she said so. She had suggested I get the referral from my oncologist. Back to square one.

 


Via Marilyn Armstrong
Sharla Shults's insight:

This is HOT, folks  and it IS real life! The epitome of screw-ups with our so-call efficient medical system. Read it and no longer wonder what is wrong with our system! Need a job? Go to work for an insurance company...no qualifications necessary! What a hoot! Welcome to life!

more...
Marilyn Armstrong's curator insight, March 19, 2013 7:47 PM

How come so  many blatantly incompetent people have jobs? Why are they working when so many others are unemployed?

 

Something is terribly wrong. I just don’t have enough strength to figure out what it is, much less fix it.

Scooped by Sharla Shults
Scoop.it!

Why Carbon Footprints Matter: What I Learned from my Hyper-Detailed Calculations

Why Carbon Footprints Matter: What I Learned from my Hyper-Detailed Calculations | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

A few years ago, I decided to figure out my exact personal carbon footprint—from every glass of wine, to a new pair of underwear, what impact I was having on the world. I thought I was probably doing a decent job; I was already running a renewable energy company, commuting by bike, and aware of energy issues. But the picture was pretty grim.

 

People have called me anally-retentive and obsessive-compulsive, and that's true. This is my life in excruciating detail, converted to the basic unit of watts so everything could easily be compared.

 

Sharla Shults's insight:

Technical? yes Informative? yes Interesting? yes Do I understand my own? no Will I endeavor to find out? Probably not

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharla Shults
Scoop.it!

The Dinner Party: Changing How We Approach Life After Loss

The Dinner Party: Changing How We Approach Life After Loss | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tyka7IrZhXU[/youtube]

 

I inherited a love of family meals from my dad, José. He worked in the wine industry, and thus was constantly traveling between different winemaking and wine-loving regions around the world. In the midst of his busy schedule and his childrens’ school calendars, taking the time to walk to the market, to chop and stir while catching up, to set a table and sit down together, became a ritual that guaranteed conversation, connection, and nourishment.

Sharla Shults's insight:

We all experience the loss of loved ones but each of us handles the situation differently. This article emphasizes the importance of conversations bringing everything to the table when openness is the key to understanding and moving on.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharla Shults
Scoop.it!

The Number One Blogging Mistake

The Number One Blogging Mistake | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
I read several blogs including John Morrow at Guest Blogging, Copyblogger with several authors and Annabel Candy at Successful Blogging. They share amazing content and I encourage you to visit and ...
Sharla Shults's insight:

The truth being said in one little word!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharla Shults
Scoop.it!

Infographic: How to Stay Healthy in the Workplace | Health on GOOD

Infographic: How to Stay Healthy in the Workplace | Health on GOOD | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
This content was produced by GOOD with support of Naked Juice In the early 1960s, nearly 50 percent of private industry jobs in the U.S. required moderate physical activity.
Sharla Shults's insight:

With desk jobs comes more and more time sitting in front of a computer. Reduce time sitting and add years to your life!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharla Shults
Scoop.it!

Viral Video: Social Media Saves the Day Reuniting Lost SD Card With Owner!

Viral Video:  Social Media Saves the Day Reuniting Lost SD Card With Owner! | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
Ad Executive's Viral Video Reunites Lost Photo Card of 300 Pix With "That Girl," Owner.
Sharla Shults's insight:

It is always good to read a story with a happy ending! Sizzle, sizzle!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharla Shults from In and About the News
Scoop.it!

Scholars Say Bones Belonged to Richard III

Scholars Say Bones Belonged to Richard III | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

LEICESTER, England — Until it was discovered beneath a city parking lot last fall, the skeleton had lain unmarked, and unmourned, for more than 500 years. Friars fearful of the men who slew him in battle buried the man in haste, naked and anonymous, without a winding sheet, rings or personal adornments of any kind, in a space so cramped his cloven skull was jammed upright and askew against the head of his shallow grave.

 

On Monday, confirming what many historians and archaeologists had suspected, a team of experts at the University of Leicester concluded on the basis of DNA and other evidence that the skeletal remains were those of King Richard III, for centuries the most reviled of English monarchs. But the conclusion, said to have been reached “beyond any reasonable doubt,” promised to achieve much more than an end to the oblivion that has been Richard’s fate since his death on Aug. 22, 1485, at the Battle of Bosworth Field, 20 miles from this ancient city in the sheep country of England’s East Midlands.

 

Among those who found his remains, there is a passionate belief that new attention drawn to Richard by the discovery will inspire a reappraisal that could rehabilitate the medieval king and show him to be a man with a strong sympathy for the rights of the common man, who was deeply wronged by his vengeful Tudor successors. Far from the villainous character memorialized in English histories, films and novels, far from Shakespeare’s damning representation of him as the limping, withered, haunted murderer of his two princely nephews, Richard III can become the subject of a new age of scholarship and popular reappraisal, these enthusiasts believe.

 

“I think he wanted to be found, he was ready to be found, and we found him, and now we can begin to tell the true story of who he was,” said Philippa Langley, a writer who has been a longtime and fervent member of the Richard III Society, an organization that has worked for decades to bring what it sees as justice to an unjustly vilified man. “Now,” Ms. Langley added, “we can rebury him with honor, and we can rebury him as a king.”

 

Other members of the team at the University of Leicester pointed to Ms. Langley as the inspiration behind the project, responsible for raising much of the estimated $250,000 — with major contributions from unnamed Americans — it cost to carry out the exhumation and the research that led to confirmation that indeed Richard had been found.

 

Ms. Langley’s account was that her research for a play about the king had led her to a hunch that Richard’s body would be found beneath the parking lot, in a corner of the buried ruins of the Greyfriars Priory, where John Rouse, a medieval historian writing in Latin within a few years after Richard’s death, had recorded him as having been buried. Other unverified accounts said the king’s body had been thrown by a mob into the River Soar, a mile or more from the priory.

 

Richard Taylor, the University of Leicester official who served as a coordinator for the project, said the last piece of the scientific puzzle fell into place with DNA findings that became available on Sunday, five months after the skeletal remains were uncovered. At that point, he said, members of the team knew that they had achieved something historic.

 

“We knew then, beyond reasonable doubt, that this was Richard III,” Mr. Taylor said. “We’re certain now, as certain as you can be of anything in life.”

The team’s leading geneticist, Turi King, said at a news conference that DNA samples from two modern-day descendants of Richard III’s family had provided a match with samples taken from the skeleton found in the priory ruins. Kevin Schurer, a historian and demographer, tracked down two living descendants of Anne of York, Richard III’s sister, one of them a London-based, Canadian-born furniture maker, Michael Ibsen, 55, and the other a second cousin of Mr. Ibsen’s who has requested anonymity.

 

Dr. King said tests conducted at three laboratories in England and France had found that the descendants’ mitochondrial DNA, a genetic element inherited through the maternal line of descent, matched that extracted from the parking lot skeleton. She said all three samples belonged to a type of mitochondrial DNA that is carried by only 1 to 2 percent of the English population, a rare enough group to satisfy the project team, pending more work on the samples, that a match had been found.

 

When she studied the results for the first time, she said, she “went very quiet, then did a little dance around the laboratory.”

 


Via Marilyn Armstrong
Sharla Shults's insight:

This IS sizzlin' news, folks! Whether you are a history buff or not, King Richard III lived, he was (and his bones are) for real. To learn more of his life (and death) is phenomenal!

more...
Marilyn Armstrong's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:48 PM

For anyone who loves history, this is totally cool. I want more information!! Lots more.

Sharla Shults's comment, February 7, 2013 8:41 AM
I agree with you, Marilyn! This is totally awesome but of course, I LOVE history! What a story...I am hungry, feed me more!