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Climate Change | LearnStuff

Climate Change | LearnStuff | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

Climate Change is Real

 

Thanks to extensive research and noticeable changes in weather and storm prevalence, it’s getting harder to turn a blind eye to the reality of climate change. Since the Industrial Age spurred the increasing usage of fossil fuels for energy production, the weather has been warming slowly. In fact, since 1880, the temperature of the earth has increased by 1 degree Celsius.

 

Although 72% of media outlets report on global warming with a skeptical air, the overwhelming majority of scientists believe that the extreme weather of the last decade is at least partially caused by global warming.

Sharla Shults's insight:

Check out the infographic to see what else the changing climate is affecting. You might find yourself quite surprised.

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Your Great Outdoors

Your Great Outdoors | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

Excerpted from Sanctuarymagazine

 

Beginning in March some of our best-known, most-loved migratory birds will arrive in Massachusetts as harbingers of spring. March is also the month when, 100 years ago, theWeeks-McLean Act, the precursor to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, passed—the first legislation in the nation to place migrants under federal jurisdiction and prohibit their killing without the permission of the US government.

 

The pre-spring arrivals that can move freely and safely from state to state thanks to such early 19th-century advocacy initiatives—sandy-colored piping plovers to beaches, winsome red-winged blackbirds to marshland, and melodious song sparrows to yards and open spaces—are just representative of the many species that still benefit from the efforts begun by pioneering conservationists.

 

“The Weeks-McLean Act was the primary legislation protecting native birds in the United States,” says Mass Audubon’s Director of Public Policy & Government Relations Jack Clarke, “and one of the country’s earliest environmental laws.” Without these protections put into place at the outset of the 1900s, other avian species would undoubtedly have been subjected to the same fate as the passenger pigeon and Carolina parakeet, whose species no longer had representative wild individuals as of 1900 and 1904, respectively, leading ultimately to their extinction.

 

Mass Audubon was one the first players promoting legislation to save birds, so it was fitting that the Weeks-McLean Act had its origins in Massachusetts. In 1908, Charles H. Hudson, a farmer in Needham Heights, wrote to his Congressional representative, John Wingate Weeks, imploring him sponsor “a national law put on all kinds of birds in every State in the country, as the gunners are shooting our birds that Nature put here….”

 

Five years in the making, the 1913 bill, introduced by Representative John W. Weeks of Massachusetts and Senator George P. McLean of Connecticut—set the stage for bird national bird conservation on a scale that was necessary to change the path of history for the good of our priceless avian life.


Via Marilyn Armstrong
Sharla Shults's insight:

I agree with Marilyn in that we have become a society too quick to kill and what's the reason? Who knows?

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Marilyn Armstrong's curator insight, March 14, 2013 11:10 AM

I'm glad we still have birds. It was the extinction of the passenger pigeon that triggered the legislation, too late for them but it has helped other species. Not that people still don't feel obliged to shoot anything that can't shoot back because it's there. When we aren't killing each other, we seem happy enough to kill anything that walks or flies, and not because we are hungry. Just because we can. Shame on us.

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How Designing 'Badges of Honor' Can Reward Businesses for Reducing Organic Waste

How Designing 'Badges of Honor' Can Reward Businesses for Reducing Organic Waste | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it

"Did you know that food scraps and food-soiled paper make up a quarter of our garbage? They also create methane—a potent greenhouse gas—when landfilled. Every day countless businesses across the country are choosing to make the extra effort to minimize the impact their operations have on our environment.  One of the areas in which a lot of progress is currently being made is in organics recycling. Organics recycling includes both traditional composting, as well as innovative programs such as “Food-to-People,” in which edible food is donated to people in need, and “Food-to-Livestock,” in which organic waste is sent to local farmers for hog-feed." 

Sharla Shults's insight:

There is absolutely too much waste! Good to at least see some good come of  it.

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Solar Panels and Schoolyard Chickens: A Net-Positive Campus

Solar Panels and Schoolyard Chickens: A Net-Positive Campus | Sizzlin' News | Scoop.it
Solar Panels and Schoolyard Chickens: A Net-Positive Campus
Sharla Shults's insight:

A shift in 21st century priorities towards intentionality, stewardship, and service - something positive for a change!

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