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So you wanna be a professional voice actor, eh? Try this...Pinky and the Brain's greatest tongue-twister of all time | Boingboing

So you wanna be a professional voice actor, eh? Try this...Pinky and the Brain's greatest tongue-twister of all time | Boingboing | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it
A reminder that Animaniacs/Pinky and the Brain were a high-water mark in kids' animation: the greatest English-language tongue-twister of all time!

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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, November 12, 2013 12:14 AM

We are always in awe of the amazing talent on display  in "Pinky and the Brain. The writing and acting were impeccable and here, the brilliant Rob Paulsen and Maurice LaMarche, demonstrate why they were one of the greatest cartoon duos of all time....

 

The spript for this episode, "You Said a Mouseful," can be found here: http://hvrd.me/9xvHWb

 

Yes,  it's that Harvard University and we double dog dare you to try it! 

 

Extra credit to anyone who guesses the actor who played Hackensack Socko Kicky-Sack Sack Kicker Factory Senior Supervisor, Kurt Sackett. (Hint: An actor best known for starring in an iconic 1980's ad campaign.)

 

Marc Morrell's curator insight, November 12, 2013 9:53 AM

I think the hardest line in all of this has to be "

The schlick shick sleet schlitter's schleet."
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Tips for Minimizing Plosives, Including How to Optimally Place a Pop Screen | Randy Coppinger, Audio Craftsman

Tips for Minimizing Plosives, Including How to Optimally Place a Pop Screen | Randy Coppinger, Audio Craftsman | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

"Gary Terzza of VO Master Class provides this useful techniques for placing a pop stopper for maximum effectiveness:
“Place your hand (palm facing towards you) between the pop shield and the mic and blow gently. Now move the popper slowly towards you while still blowing. Stop at the point you can no longer feel the breath. This is the optimum point at which the air is diffused, stopping those intrusive Ps and Bs.”


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, October 18, 2013 9:02 PM

Great post from self-described "audio craftsman," Randy Coppinger with several suggestions for minimizing plosives while recording. 

 

We're particularly intrigued by the double pop screen idea, but of course, it makes sense to first make sure that our first pop stopper is positioned properly. 

 

Many thanks to Randy and UK-based voice actor & coach, Gary Terza, for these valuable time- and take-saving tips!

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Voiceover terminology & jargon, Part Deux: Even more VO Lingo, Pt.2 | piehole.ie

Voiceover terminology & jargon, Part Deux: Even more VO Lingo, Pt.2 | piehole.ie | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it
The WHAT!? Understanding Voice Over Lingo was so popular and some of you sent us a few new words to add to our little voice over lingo dictionary. I decide to write a part two for everyone to enjoy.

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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, September 23, 2013 5:02 PM

Are you fluent in voiceover? If not, Piehole is back with more voiceover and recording studio-speak. Reading through this article and the first article referenced above, should give you a pretty good grounding in Basic Voiceoverese.

 

Sure there is more jargon to master (and it varies by where you're located geographically), but knowledge of these commonly-used terms should get you through a typical commercial recording session.

 

By the way, animation and game sessions use may of these same terms, but they also have their own specific terms that are relevant to those particulars genres.

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Watch 'A Great Voice,' a new short film about famed trailer/voiceover artist Hal Douglas | Boing Boing

Watch 'A Great Voice,' a new short film about famed trailer/voiceover artist Hal Douglas | Boing Boing | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

Filmmaker Casimir Nozkowski has a new short out about Hal Douglas, one of the most famous movie trailer voices ever. It's absolutely wonderful. Douglas is immediately recognizable as the voice of thousands of trailers, commercials and television promos...he reflects on his body of work, his technique and the current state of his instrument.


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, August 28, 2013 8:24 PM

An interesting, offbeat 9-minute documentary about the legendar promo/trailer voice actor, Hal Douglas, who, at age 89, is still working regularly from his home in Virginia.

 

Ironically, though the film is entitled "A Great Voice," you may be surprised to learn that after a decades-long wildly successful career in voiceover, even Hal Douglas finds fault with his own voice, as most voice actors do, though he seems to have made peace with it. 

 

And in case you are wondering, Hal was 17 years older than the late, great Don LaFontaine and on the voiceover scene long before him. In fact, many in the industry contend that it was Hal, not Don, who immortalized the phrase,"In a world...

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How to Do Voiceover for Video Games | Acting in London

How to Do Voiceover for Video Games | Acting in London | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

"When hiring the talent, agents and casting directors prefer these voice actors to not only have a good voice and be able to switch up characters or do accents, but also act. And quite often, voice over work requires some serious acting chops from their performers. The widely popular video game The Last of Us comes as a good example of this, having great voice over work that at times required the actors to turn their dramatic skills way up.

 

Another tricky part when aspiring to do voice over for video games is that actors usually never see their sides ahead of the audition or work day, which means they have to be able to nail down the voices in a very short amount of time, on the day."


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, August 23, 2013 1:02 PM

A good, general overview of what it takes to get cast in video games, but by the blogger's own admission he is not an expert on the topic, so there are a couple of errors and omissions... 

 

For example, the game industry has already surpassed the movie industry. Revenues generated from games have exceeded global revenues from film since 2006.  

 

You should also know that in addition to mastering the following abilities listed in order of importance---acting, acting, acting, dialects, cold reading, versatility, excellent vocal technique---the ability to visualize/imagine is right up there with acting. You have to be able to read a script and "see" the scene(s) on order to play it.

 

And finally, while it's true that there are many opportunities for voice actors in games, and that the work for voice actors will only increase as games become more character- and plot-driven (similar to movies), as the industry matures, game companies are becoming more discriminating and sophisticated about their casting decisions and the level of actors they cast in their games as well. 

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Disney Announces Voice Casting for Finding Dory, The Good Dinosaur & Inside Out

Disney Announces Voice Casting for Finding Dory, The Good Dinosaur & Inside Out | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

Disney announced on Friday at the D23 expo in Anaheim, that Diane Keaton and Eugene Levy will join Ellen DeGeneres and Albert Brooks in the Disney/Pixar Finding Nemo sequel, Finding Dory. Keaton and Levy will play Dory’s long-lost parents. Ty Burrell has also been added to the cast, playing a whale named Bailey.

 


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, August 11, 2013 12:52 AM

Voice cast for Pixar's next three films announced...

 

Diane Keaton as Dory's mom..? Now THAT's perfect casting! And maybe even more perfect, Louis Black as "Anger!"

 

We're also really happy to see the very funny and exceptionally talented, Bill Hader, finally getting the recognition he justly deserves. This will make three Pixar films in a row for him, including "Monsters University." Looks like he just may turn out to be the new John Ratzenberger!

Sylvain Latendresse's curator insight, August 11, 2013 12:15 PM

VO cast.: Diane Keaton and Eugene Levy will join Ellen DeGeneres and Albert Brooks in the Disney/Pixar Finding Nemo sequel

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Top 100 New Talent

Top 100 New Talent | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it
Top 100 new talent on Voices.com (This could be you - a working bona fide #voartist http://t.co/m1JLNRcvEt Enter to win http://t.co/61OhlNGeXA ...
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The Great Voice Over Performances of this Generation | Explosion.com

The Great Voice Over Performances of this Generation | Explosion.com | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

"...Voice acting is now an integral part of most games helping to define characters, forward narrative, and in some cases offer the primary form of gameplay.  While rising to prominence in the age of Playstation and Nintendo 64, voice acting really got its hooks into the industry with the following generation and has seen the start of a golden age with the current generation.  Today, whether games are AAA or independent, featuring robots or humans, comedic or dramatic, voice acting is an important part of the experience.  Let’s take a look at some of the highlights in voice acting over this current generation..."


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, July 21, 2013 2:10 PM

Really interesting list of exceptional voice actors in games that is not just a rehash of the usual suspects. While they give excellent, reliable and well-known voice actors like Jennifer Hale, Phil LaMarr, and Troy Baker their due props, they reserve their "Great" status for six characters/actors each ground-breaking in hos/her own way. 

 

We're particularly glad to see one of our own SF Bay Area voice actors and friend to many regular followers of this blog, Melissa Hutchinson, on the list for her unforgettable portrayal of "Clementine," the young protagonist of the award-winning "The Walking Dead Game." Congratulations, Melissa!

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Primetime Emmy Awards nominations for 2013 - Outstanding Voice-Over Performance

Primetime Emmy Awards nominations for 2013 - Outstanding Voice-Over Performance | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

2013 Emmy Awards Outstanding Voice-Over Performance Nominees:

An Apology To Elephants • HBO • Lily Tomlin as NarratorFamily Guy • Brian’s Play • FOX • Seth MacFarlane as Brian Griffin, Stewie Griffin, Peter GriffinFamily Guy • Lois Comes Out Of Her Shell • FOX • Alex Borstein as Lois Griffin, Tricia TakanawaThe Looney Tunes Show • We’re In Big Truffle • Cartoon Network • Bob Bergen as Porky PigRobot Chicken • Hurtled From A Helicopter Into A Speeding Train • Cartoon Network • Sam Elliott as NarratorRobot Chicken DC Comics Special • Cartoon Network • Seth Green as Aquaman, Batman, Nerd, Abin Sur, Martian Manhunter, Robin, Green Arrow
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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, July 19, 2013 7:34 PM

In case you missed it the other day when the awards were announced, here's the list of 2013 Emmy nominees for "Outstanding Voiceover Performance." Glad to see talented, veteran voice actor, Bob Bergen, friend and coach to many InsideVO followers among them. 

 

For those of you who may not know Bob's story, he decided at the age of 5 that he was going to grow up to be "Porky Pig" and has succeeded beyond his wildest dreams. Bob is another great example of focus, hard work and persistence paying off. We're pulling for you, Bob!

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How to Audition for a Voice Over Role & Improve Your Chances of Getting the Part | Sean Crisdin

How to Audition for a Voice Over Role & Improve Your Chances of Getting the Part | Sean Crisdin | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

"Being heavily involved in the casting process for the animated film Dinonauts has been a very fun experience. It’s the first time I’ve worked to cast a project this large and the response has been quite tremendous. It’s particularly interesting since I’m a voice talent (surprise!) and get to be on the other side of the booth and dirty my hands in a process that is usually a mystery to talent (aside from the ritualistic crossing of sweaty fingers). It’s the “pick me, pick me!” game.

 

Through the process, it occurred to me that many of the audition submissions I received were victim to several recurring elements that dramatically hurt their chances of being cast. In some cases such errors clobbered their chances of even being listened to." 


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, July 16, 2013 12:49 AM

Arizona-based voice actor and director, Sean Crisden, is currently involved in casting an animated feature. After listening to a whole bunch of auditions---both good and bad--Sean has gained some valuable insights into what to do and what NOT to do when you submit your auditions that he is generously sharing with his fellow voice actors.

 

Having done a fair amount of casting ourselves, we would definitely concur with Sean's observations and suggestions, and would add that they don't just apply to to animation auditions, but all voiceover auditions, in general.

 

Apparently one thing that you definitely should NOT do, according to Sean, is to have someone washing dishes in the sink in the background as you record your audition. Apparently, this really happened. Among the extraneous background noises we've heard on auditions are crying babies, tropical birds and flushing toilets, but washing dishes in the sink was a new one on us, too! 

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Actors Today Don’t Just Read for the Part. Reading IS the Part | New York Times

Actors Today Don’t Just Read for the Part. Reading IS the Part | New York Times | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it
As audiobooks flourish, thanks in part to digital technologies, the industry has given many aspiring actors a steady paycheck.

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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, June 30, 2013 10:04 AM

Great article in the New York times on how narrating audiobooks is fast becoming one of the best ways for actors to make a steady income. So much so, in fact, that Julliard and Yale are teaching workshops in it.

 

So, fellow voice actors, consider for a moment the implications of that...You will be competing for work against the best-trained actors in the country. If you have ZERO or negligible training as an actor, how are you going to compete?

 

And let us be clear, just taking voice acting workshops, while absolutely necessary to learn the specialized craft of voice acting---which is a subset of acting---is NOT the same as studying acting. There is no substitute for the experience of getting up in front of an group and performing a scene. It's what actors have been doing for 1000's of years and if you want to call yourself an "actor" of any kind, you need to do this regularly, and get to the point where you're as comfortable doing a scene in front of an audience as you are brushing your teeth. (You can't be a Cardiologist without getting your MD, first.)

 

We've had several voice acting students tell us, "I don't need to take a scene study class, because I don't intend to do stage or on-camera acting," but then those same students complain that they get passed over by agents or don't get enough auditions or that they seldom book the jobs they audition for...

 

For those of you experiencing frustration and stagnation in your progress as a voice actor, especially those of you wondering why you can't break into video games or get passed over for better-paying jobs on ACX, the root of your problem, is most likely your weak acting ability, for which all of the greatest audio equipment in the world cannot compensate. 

 

By the way, it's not as though you need to choose one or the other. There is no reason that you can't take both voice acting AND acting classes simutaneously. In fact, we promise you that if you do, you will progress much faster in your voice acting. 

 

[H/T to friend of InsideVO, voice actor, David Boyll, for finding ths article and posting first.]

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Voice-over lessons convince columnist to keep his day job | Los Angeles Times

Voice-over lessons convince columnist to keep his day job | Los Angeles Times | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

"There may be jobs aplenty for those with a good set of pipes, but learning to emote about Del Taco's classic combo or cheap car insurance is harder than it sounds..."


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, June 26, 2013 6:20 AM

Some of you may recall that veteran journalist and best-selling author, Steve Lopez, was portrayed by Robert Downey, Jr., in the film "The Soloist," based on the writer's friendship with a schizophrenic, homeless man who Lopez eventually discovers was once a Juilliard student and cello prodigy.

 

However, in this article in which he describes his frustrating attempt at voice acting, we're all reminded that no matter how smart, talented and professional you may be in your day job, learning the craft of voiceover can bring even the most confident and otherwise competent, among us to his or her knees.

 

Yet, despite the fact that he reaches the conclusion that he is a long way from becoming professional voice actor and questions his innate ability to learn acting, he seems to have enjoyed the challenge and is proud of the progress that he made. We've been around long enough to know when someone gets bitten by the voice acting bug. And you'll notice that he leaves the door open just a crack to the possibility of going on...In fact, we wouldn't be at all surprised if some of you down in LA were to run into Mr. Lopez in one of your future voice acting workshops...

 

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Marcia Wallace, ‘The Bob Newhart Show’ Actor and Voice of ‘The Simpsons’ Mrs. Krabappel, Dies at 70 | EW.com

Marcia Wallace, ‘The Bob Newhart Show’ Actor and Voice of ‘The Simpsons’ Mrs. Krabappel, Dies at 70 | EW.com | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

"As Edna Krabappel on The Simpsons, Marcia Wallace may be the only 4th-grade teacher to have the same student for 24 years. Before that, she was beloved as Carol Kester, the lovelorn, wisecracking secretary on The Bob Newhart Show.

Wallace...has died at age 70, according to the showrunner of The Simpsons. “I was tremendously saddened to learn this morning of the passing of the brilliant and gracious Marcia Wallace,” producer Al Jean said in a statement to EW. “She was beloved by all at The Simpsons and we intend to retire her irreplaceable character.”


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, October 26, 2013 9:50 PM

So very saddened to hear the news of the the funny, tremendously talented, gracious, irreplaceable and much loved, Marcia Wallace's passing yesterday.. Her characters were always smart, funny, relatable and human.

 

Leave it to "Lisa Simpson" to say it best (via Twitter): 

 

"Cheers to the hilarious, kind, fab Marcia Wallace, who has taken her leave of us. Heaven is now a much funnier place b/c of you, Marcia," Yeardley Smith, 

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Voice Actor Gives Himself a Shout-Out in Little Caesars Radio Ad AdWeek

Voice Actor Gives Himself a Shout-Out in Little Caesars Radio Ad AdWeek | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it
OK, Alan Varner, you probably think it's real cute that you broke through the "fourth wall" in this Little Caesars radio ad from Barton F. Graf 9000, inviting listeners who visit the restaurant to "tell 'em Alan Varner sent you.

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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, September 28, 2013 10:26 AM

Voice actor, Alan Varner hits the VO jackpot! Not only does he have the Little Caesar's account, which is a pretty sweet gig in and of itself, but the company has also decided to use him as the centerpiece of their radio ad campaign. As a result, Alan is getting what probably amounts to hundreds of thousands of dollars of free advertising...

 

And in case you're wondering, if you go to AlanDoesVoices.com it actually takes you to a cheesy (pun intended) website that's been created for the ad. Way to go Alan Varner! 

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RARE VIDEO of William (Bill) Scott & June Foray, Voices of Rocky and Bullwinkle

This is a classic view of Bill Scott and June Foray. Bill sadly is no longer with us but June still is! This has local Boston content June has roots in Bosto...

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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, September 13, 2013 5:42 PM

This rare video, which we're guessing is vintage late 70's-early 80's, was recorded during a visit these two voiceover geniuses made to a Boston radio station that to promote a fan fest in which they were appearing at the time..

 

How rare is it? We've viewed literally 1000's of voiceover related videos over the past 2 1/2+ years since we've started InsideVO, and have never seen anything similar to this that provides a glimpse of how the two worked together and developed their now classic, character voices. 

 

Sadly, Bill Scott, who also voiced Mr. Peabody, Dudley Doright and George of the Jungle passed away in 1985. (For more about Mr. Scott, who considered himself an animator first and foremost, here is a link to a fascinating, detailed interview with him from 1982: http://cartoonician.com/bullwinkle-speaks-an-interview-with-bill-scott/)

 

The amazing Ms. Foray as many of you know, is still going strong and working at the age of 95! In fact, she will be presented with the Governors' Award at the Creative Emmy awards this Sunday. Certainly gives the rest of us something to aspire to!

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John DiMaggio, Voice of Bender in Futurama Reveals How to Break Into the Voice Acting Industry | Show Business Show

John DiMaggio, Voice of Bender in Futurama Reveals How to Break Into the Voice Acting Industry | Show Business Show | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

"John DiMaggio, world-renowned, Emmy-nominated, and Annie Award winning voiceover actor, dishes the details about how to break into the voice acting industry and climb to the top...the Hollywood star [reveals] what it takes to win over both casting directors’ and fans’ hearts, how to book gigs, and who to maintain relationships with to reach success in the acting and voiceover industry."


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, August 27, 2013 5:51 PM

This interview with voice actor, John DiMaggio, goes into much more detail about the business and marketing end of voice acting than your usual celebrity voice actor interview. While there's a bit of confusion around the "one thing you must do to succeed in voiceover"---John actually names four or five things as the "one thing you must do" over the course of the half-hour interview---he still makes several excellent points. Among these, the mindset you need to develop to handle a lot of rejection; having all your demos and marketing produced, ready-to-go and easily accesible; and the importance of having key people inside the industry (casting directors, agents, etc.) who are willing to go to bat for you.

 

Our favorite quote from the interview: "If you're doing this for the money or because you want to be famous, I don't want to know you."

 

John also gives a status update on the soon-to-be-released  "I Know That Voice" documentary he's producing, or as he refers to it, a "love letter to the incredible professional voice actors I have the privilege of working with with every day."

Marc Morrell's curator insight, August 28, 2013 8:46 AM

I interviewed John at San Diego Comic-Con in July for Adventure time, where he plays Jake the Dog. This man is an absolute professional, and a really cool guy. I can't wait to see his documentary, I Know That Voice.

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An Actor Hub Guide to Building a Character: 10 Questions You Need To Answer

An Actor Hub Guide to Building a Character: 10 Questions You Need To Answer | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

As an actor it is your job to make the character you are playing, either on stage or screen, a fully rounded human being. This takes time and effort. Here are the ten questions you should be able to answer before playing any role:

Who am I?Where am I?When is it?Where have I just come from?What do I want?Why do I want it?Why do I want it now?What will happen if I don’t get it now?How will I get what I want by doing what?What must I overcome?

 

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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, August 16, 2013 10:11 AM

Do I really have to do this kind of thorough, thoughtful analysis if I am "just" playing a voiceover character? In a word, yes, but with some modifications..

 

Clearly when you're developing a character for a commerical or video game, you don't normally have weeks and weeks of rehearsals and in-depth analysis to figure this all out, as you would were you playing a character on stage or on-camera; sometimes you only have 5-10 minutes.

 

The good news is that games and commercial characters normally use the same  "types" of characters of characters over and over again. Once you have developed a go-to "harried mom" character, you don't have to reinvent the character next time you audition for this type of role. If you have a "brash, cocky, confident hero character" you bring out for video games, you can recycle the character for different video game auditions, by adding a few 'cosmetic" modifications, like adding an accent or using a slightly different vocal placement.

 

Bottom line is though that you still need to do the work and answer the basic questions. you just learn to do it at an accelerated pace by recognizing the character types when you're a voice actor. 

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The hot job in Hollywood? Voice overs. | Washington Post

The hot job in Hollywood? Voice overs.  | Washington Post | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

“Back in the day, they’d hire veteran voice-over guys who could do a plethora of voices,” says [Brad] Garrett, who voices a fuel truck in Disney’s “Planes.” Now, we’re starting to see big-name actors do the same thing — disguising their voices, slinging wild accents.

Check out “Despicable Me 2.” Taking their cue from star Steve Carell, who does a semi-Slavic riff for mad-scientist Gru, co-stars Russell Brand, Steve Coogan and Kristen Wiig color their voices and “hide behind the mike,” as Garrett puts it.

 

Wiig could just “be myself,” she says, playing a secret agent in that film. “But where’s the fun in that?”


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, August 11, 2013 1:50 PM

Casting celebrities in animated films is nothing new, but what is new is that celebrities are actually taking on the challenge of playing characters that don't sound like them. Some to greater success than others... 

 

It should also be pointed out that celebrities like Steve Carrell are totally at home behind the mic, because they had extensive voice acting experience before becoming "celebrities." Steve Carell (along with Stephen Colbert) has been providing the voices for SNL's "Ambiguously Gay Duo's," Gary, since 1996, when he was still a struggling actor/writing and teaching improv at Second City.  

Sylvain Latendresse's curator insight, August 12, 2013 1:08 PM

Voice-over news!

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Bob Bergen: The nice Jewish boy who wanted to become Porky Pig and did! | Digital Journal

Bob Bergen: The nice Jewish boy who wanted to become Porky Pig and did! | Digital Journal | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

The key word there is ‘acting’. My suggestion would be become the best actor you possibly can. If you’re a kid, get involved in every school play. Do community theater. Study improv. That’s the best training in the world. Once you’re a solid actor, then you’ve got to study voiceover. But not just animation voiceover, you’ve got to study commercial voiceover because that’s the day to day bread and butter. I would recommend, if animation is your thing, get yourself to L.A. to train because this is where the real training is. And this is where the work is.

 

It’s all about the acting. It’s not just doing silly voices. It’s what you do with the words. The script is skeleton. Your job is to give it a body. You really have to be a solid actor to be able to compete."


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, August 9, 2013 12:36 AM

Always entertaining and eager to share his wisdom with other voice actors, Emmy-nominated voice actor, Bob Bergen, talks about how he achieved his childhood ambition ("becoming Porky Pig"); sustaining a long, successful voiceover career; the state of today's animation industry ("There has never been a better time and more opportunity for people pursuing animation"); and what aspiring animation voice actors need to know before starting ("become the best actor you can"). 


Valuable, thoughtful and honest advice; well worth reading, especially if you're interested in pursuing animation work. 

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45% of Gamers Are Now Female; Will This Translate to More Female Roles in Games? | Fast Company

45% of Gamers Are Now Female; Will This Translate to More Female Roles in Games? | Fast Company | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

In its annual report the Entertainment Software Association found 45 of all gamers are female...While it's rare for larger studios in America to feature female protagonists, some are noticing "more strong female characters from new games, and that's primarily coming from Japan..."


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, July 29, 2013 11:45 PM

Almost as many women as men now play video games. Perhaps that accounts, at least in part, for character-driven games with actual plots and involving stories like, "The Walking Dead" and "Last of Us," doing so well both critically and in sales.

 

Though some gaming companies have a long, long way to go to catch up, it's inevitable that the changing demographics of game players will have an impact on the types of games that get greenlighted and the number of female characters in them. We think that this is excellent news for both female and male voice actors as evidenced by the aforementioned games which had great, meaty (zombies or not) roles for both female and male actors.

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Pixar and Their Flawless Casting Choices for Character Voices | OhNoYouDidn't!

Pixar and Their Flawless Casting Choices for Character Voices | OhNoYouDidn't! | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it
There are many things that go into creating a successful animated picture - the quality of animation, a graceful script that speaks to various demographics and perhaps most importantly, great voice-over talent .

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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, July 19, 2013 8:31 PM

Interesting post that discusses Pixar's commitment to flawless casting and also singles out some great, but often overlooked performances in Pixar movies in addition to ones cited most frequently such as, "Woody," "Dori," and "Edna Mode." Craig T. Nelson's, "Bob Parr," is near the top of our list, too, but a large part of what made his performance so brilliant was the relationship with Holly Hunter's "Helen Parr," also an underrated performance.  

 

Pixar is so committed to casting perfection that they've actually recast the leads in their films in the middle of a production more than once. And this was not because the original actors they picked were "bad"---in fact, on two occasions that we know of, the actors that were replaced were Academy Award-winners---but the actors who replaced them were definitely better suited to the roles. 

 

 

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Exclusive: Meet A Few Of The (Non-Celebrity) Voice Actors That Helped Bring 'Monsters University' To Life | Pixar Times

Exclusive: Meet A Few Of The (Non-Celebrity) Voice Actors That Helped Bring 'Monsters University' To Life | Pixar Times | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it

Pixar has a reputation for casting actors that work for its characters, rather than simply searching for celebrities to fill its roles. The studio has understood, from its first feature film, that a strong story and memorable characters are necessary to make a great film, and that those characters need to connect with the audience. Although you may recall the voices of veterans like Tom Hanks (Toy Story) and Albert Brooks (Finding Nemo), there are many other voices that are essential in bringing the story to life."


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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, July 17, 2013 6:59 PM

It's nice to see these talented professional voice actors who aren't celebrities being recognized and acknowledged for their great work on "Monsters University."

 

Of course, with Pixar's standards being as high as they are, the "non-celebrity" voice actors they use for even the "walk on" roles are among the best of the best voice actors anywhere. Many of you know Jess Harnell as "Yacko Warner" from "Animaniacs" and from a host of video games and animated series. Lori Alan has had a long, successful career as an animation and commercial voiceover and on-camera actor. (You may remember her as the "Open. open, open!" Mervyn's lady.)" The two other actors mentioned, John Cygan and Mona Marshall, also have impressive off- and on-camera resumes stretching back decades.

 

So if you aspire to get to this level of voice acting, we offer you the same advice we gave to the kid we ran into on the street in Emeryville the other day who asked us how to get to Pixar..."Practice, kid. Practice!"

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Hayao Miyazaki Says Cutesy Anime Voiceovers Are “Unbearable” | Kotaku

Hayao Miyazaki Says Cutesy Anime Voiceovers Are “Unbearable” | Kotaku | Sites by Doreen | Scoop.it
Filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki is known for iconic anime like My Neighbor Totoro. He's also known for telling it like it is. If he thinks using the iPad looks like masturbation, then he's gonna damn well say that.

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Sirenetta Leoni's curator insight, July 6, 2013 11:05 PM

Take it from one of the world's greatest living animators and creative mind behind several of the best animated films of the last few decades, Hayao Miyazaki, who detests voice acting which calls attention to itself and whose primary focus is not to advance the action and the story, but the actor. These types of performances are, in the words of the great master, "unbearable."

 

Far be it from us to disagree with the brilliantly astute director.

jinseon's curator insight, November 11, 2014 8:47 AM

It's nice!

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Injustice Gods Among Us Raven's Voice Change

@Starfinder4 @subsailor688 http://t.co/j9oekaXCyF This is two different versions of the voice from Injustice. You can tell its Tara Strong.
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