Sinica Geography 400
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Infographic: United States of the Environment

Infographic: United States of the Environment | Sinica Geography 400 | Scoop.it
Every U.S. state is No. 1 in some environmental category ... and No. 50 in another.

 

A fun map that can be used to discuss environmental issues at both the national and local level for American teachers. 


Via Seth Dixon
Brett Sinica's insight:

I am always drawn to these type of maps where data is collected to determine which states are known for this or that.  I have seen maps regarding "state food" and favorite sports teams to name a few, but this one in particular isn't so fun.  It shows each state by negative aspects which in fact could actual be useful for things such as travel.  Say you have asthma or other respiratory problems, after viewing this map one would probably stay away from California or specificaly Los Angeles due to their levels of smog.  On the other hand, according to the map, being a vegetarian in the state of Oklahoma wouldn't be as easy as a more "fruitful" place considering the state has been rated to eat the fewest fruit and vegetables.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, September 22, 2014 3:11 PM

Rhode Island excels at having the lowest CO2 emissions. This makes a lot of sense when you consider the characteristics the State as it relates to pollution. Manufacturing is not a large part of Rhode Island's production, therefore CO2 emissions from factories is less than many other states. Furthermore CO2 from automobiles is low because of the small size of the state. Commutes for people working and living in Rhode Island are no longer than an hour each way. The minimal drive time for each person also cuts down possible emissions. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 8:41 PM

This fun and interactive map shows where each state excel and where they falter. Its interesting to see that in a state a small as Rhode Island, it has the highest rate of breast cancer in the nation. And the state of Colorado has the most avalanche deaths, which when you think of the state of Colorado, you wouldn't think of Colorado as a state with a lot of avalanches. What really surprised me  was Alaska as having the most airports per capita. One wouldn't think this of Alaska since it is a state covered mostly with snow. And it raises the question as to how many people travel in and out of the state. With all of the states surprises, one thing that shocked me a bit was how much organic food is grown in this land. That's one thing that is surprising. I once viewed this land as a of imports of just about everything, but looking at these two maps have changed my outlook of this land.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, January 24, 2015 10:12 PM

Scary to look at the New England region as five of the six states are highest in a form of cancer.Is there a causal connection that should be investigated? Probably doesn't help we live next door to NY and NJ, highest in air pollution and most Superfund sites respectively. As a parent with a son who has autism, I feel for the folks in Ohio. Both California and Florida get the "duh" award for leading in smog and boating wrecks.

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China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | Sinica Geography 400 | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


Via Seth Dixon
Brett Sinica's insight:

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

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Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 2:04 PM

Very simple and easy to interpret graph on the One child policy in China. When thinking about the "has it been successful" section I was troubled. Yes the government came close to its goal of 1.2 Billion but do so they prevented 400 million births. So its successful because they almost hit the mark but at what costs? Natal policies can leave countries without enough people to repopulate the workforce, we have to keep this in mind. Controlling population is a dangerous project.. 

Daniel Eggen's curator insight, February 9, 2015 8:13 PM

Great infographic on the One Child Policy. Based on the birth rates in other countries in the East Asia region, how much demographic change may there have been in China without the implementation of this policy?