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Popocatépetl

Popocatépetl | Sinica Geography 400 | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Brett Sinica's insight:

Among active volcanos in the world, this would be an extremly devastating one if it were to explode.  Less than 50 miles from Mexico City, which is home to more than 20 million people in its entirety could be of threat.  Just this year in July, there was steam and ash released which cancelled flights in and out of Mexico City and Toluca.  That's a mere fraction of what could happen if this volcano had a full-blown explosion.  On a lighter note, on days with good weather, this volcano is quite a spectacle of nearby cities and is the second highest peak in Mexico.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 12, 2013 9:18 AM

This image is from June 11, 2013, but if you click on the link you will see an image of Popocatépetl that is refreshed every minute.  This massive volcano looms over Mexico City and plays a key role in the mythology of the city.  The images are taken from a relatively new station in Tochimilco (clouds or intense weather might occasionally limit the visibility of the volcano).


Tags: Mexico, physical.

sabina cardascia's curator insight, June 12, 2013 7:26 PM

horror!!!

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Shifting sands: Changing Geography of the Mexican Drug War

Shifting sands: Changing Geography of the Mexican Drug War | Sinica Geography 400 | Scoop.it

FIVE years ago next week, Felipe Calderón took office as Mexico’s president and launched a crackdown against organised crime.

 

While the rates of murders are plateauing at 12,000 per year, internally where are these murders taking place?  Which places are becoming more critical to control?  Murders are shifting east (From Sinaloa and Chihuahua to Nuevo Leon and Veracruz).  Why is this shift occurring?  What does this shift indicate politically and economically for Mexico?


Via Seth Dixon
Brett Sinica's insight:

These numbers are astonishing especially when based simply on drugs, money, and power.  Compared to the article where it described Tijuana as still being one of the major cities for murder, the numbers and color scheme seem to show the region as one of the areas with less murders.  Heading south into the country, is Mexico City.  The city which is surrounded by such a large metropolitan area with a vast gap between poor and rich tends to have low murder rates.  This is very interesting considering popular belief tends to focus on such violence being conducted in large cities where there is better chance of cartels using the neighborhoods and people within them to strengthen their empire.  This makes me wonder if the authorities are too strong for cartels to infiltrate and become powerful, or on a limb, do the cartels have a mutual agreement not to do business in the country's economical and cultural hub?

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, September 24, 2012 12:33 PM
This map strikes me. I guess there can be a map of anything and everything. On the social side of this topic, it is overwhelming to see the high murder rates. While there are percentages shifting thorughout territories, the crime still remains. While murder rates lower in one area, they are sure to rise in others. This gang vs. government fight is a battle that has lasted many years, and sadly will continue...
Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 26, 2012 11:28 AM
What this map as well as article show me is that there is corruption in every aspect of the Mexican Goverment and at some point or another the goverment is taking sides with or assisstance from some of the major cartels. In order to crack down other groups to get rid of them. So in order to fully curb and elminate the cartels the Goverment will have to become stronger, independnt, and not assossciate with one group over another. They should try and perharps raise a larger enough force like the military and just systemmatically* force these cartels out one by one.
Julia & Eva's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:34 PM

This artilce falls under the category of political. It shows that Mexico's continuing drug war has effected the people that live there with lots of violence. By getting a new president, their murder rates have gone down, which has had a significant benefit on their country.

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For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico

For Migrants, New Land of Opportunity Is Mexico | Sinica Geography 400 | Scoop.it

"With Europe sputtering and China costly, the 'stars are aligning' for Mexico as broad changes in the global economy create new dynamics of migration."


Via Seth Dixon
Brett Sinica's insight:

Mexico could be on the rise to become one of the world's manufacturing powers.  The workforce is already there, now it's up to companies and people to build jobs for the citizens and immigrants moving in.  Amazingly, a country which had so much migration away from the country is now moving back, and with they're not doing it alone but with people from around the world.  "Build it and they will come".  That being said, Mexico not only has appealing labor rates compared to China and other areas of the world, but the proximity to the United States makes opportunity very appealing.  Being next to the U.S., a country which imports so much of its supplies, can be a gold mine for Mexico.  In the future it is possible for the tables to turn.  Where there was once Mexicans crossing the border for work, it could be Americans crossing the border into Mexico for work.  An extreme statement, but anything can happen in this day and age.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:43 PM

The wealth of a nation can come from many differnet aspects, jobs land, ecnomy, resoucres, and labor force. In many contries like china and indina they have lots of factorys and factory workers. However what ahppens when the cost of living and transporations go up, should we give workers a pay raise? NO. The answer is to find people who are able to work for cheeper. This lead to the mass influx of mexican factorites and the mass influx of forign workers fleeing to mexico for the jobs and simple life.

It was very interesting to see how even workers form the US were going to mexico in search of jobs becuse ten years ago it was the exact oppisit.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 3:44 PM

As domestic problems increase in countries where the United States have been previously "setting up shop", institutions are rethinking where they outsource manufacturing to.  It is becoming increasingly more expensive to ship goods from China or Europe.  People of all sorts are turning to Mexico, where the United States already has a good manufacturing foundation, to find new opportunities in many different increasingly competitive (globally) sectors.  This is allowing Mexico to be culturally, economically, and socially closer than ever before to many countries around the world.  This large influx of people from all around the world is definitely welcomed, but is being monitored and managed with great care and strategy in order to ensure that this shift benefits everyone.  Mexico is currently very flexible since it is transitioning into a more first-world country; this gives entrepreneurs a great place to start experimenting and migrants a chance to shape Mexico.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 10:39 AM

Foreigners on work visas is a huge and broadening event that is happening throughout the world. Most of the people on work visas have migrated from the U.S. and more now than ever, Europe. With dwelling economies, people are being forced to migrate towards the U.S. and Mexico.

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For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home

For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home | Sinica Geography 400 | Scoop.it

"Economic, demographic and social changes in Mexico are suppressing illegal immigration as much as the poor economy or legal crackdowns in the United States."


Via Seth Dixon
Brett Sinica's insight:

I look at this article and think, "perfect timing".  Within the last few decades, the United States was a destination to make dreams come true and raise a family with a healthy income.  That was a time where jobs and opportunities were arising within the states, so in an immigrants perspective, why not make the trip?  Now, in 2013, things are a little different.  The middle class is not as affluent as before, and people tend to be struggling compared to previous years.  Instead of saving for a summer vacation, it's saving to make the car payments and inevitable bills at the end of each month.  Immigrants obviously recognize this and making the trip becomes less and less appealing, and then there's a curveball...  The economy is improving south of the border as well as the ability to raise a family.  Why risk criminal activity and especially one's life when there are opportunites right at home?  Another issue to note is the severe risk when crossing the border.  The United States has cracked down on it's boundaries with the advancement in technology and manpower, but that's only a problem if the extremely powerful cartels are bypassed on the Mexican side.

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Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 2:28 PM
I often hear people say that Mexicans are crossing the border because they want to take all the things we have in the states, like it is some kind of 'greed' on their part. I have always said that people do not leave a place unless they are forced to, whether it is forced by other people or because their life is at stake. If there are not enough resources in an area, people will move to the nearest place with adequate resources. Instead of starving and living in the dirt, these people chose to risk their lives for the possibility of having their basic needs met. It is nice to see that Mexico is finally becoming a self-sustaining country that can offer its citizens enough to keep them from risking their lives for survival.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 5:58 PM

I often hear people say that Mexicans are crossing the border because they want to take all the things we have in the states, like it is some kind of 'greed' on their part. I have always said that people do not leave a place unless they are forced to, whether it is forced by other people or because their life is at stake. If there are not enough resources in an area, people will move to the nearest place with adequate resources. Instead of starving and living in the dirt, these people chose to risk their lives for the possibility of having their basic needs met. It is nice to see that Mexico is finally becoming a self-sustaining country that can offer its citizens enough to keep them from risking their lives for survival.

Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 1:14 PM

This article discusses how there is a significant decline of undocumented migration from Mexico into the United States.  Illegal immigration is becoming less attractive to Mexicans and they are deciding to stay in their country instead of coming to U.S. because Mexico is making some changes. It is expanding economic and educational opportunities in the cities. There is rising border crime, a major deterrent from emigrating, it is dangerous and expensive because of cartel controlled borders. Another change is the shrinking families. The manufacturing sector at the border is rising, democracy is better established, incomes have risen and poverty has declined. Also a tequila boom has taken place and has created new jobs for farmers cutting agave and for engineers at the stills.