Singularity Scoops
7.8K views | +0 today
Follow
Singularity Scoops
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Frederic Emam-Zade Gerardino from Web of Things
Scoop.it!

The wireless world: Is there chaos around the corner?

The wireless world: Is there chaos around the corner? | Singularity Scoops | Scoop.it

"Not everyone is looking forward to this with open arms however, for the same reasons people are against ID cards, and have rightfully suspicious views of centralised data. Not everyone wants their underpants to beam their movements directly to the government or their spouse. Throwing a surprise party? Forget it. Hide-and-seek? Out of the question.


‘Everyday objects are increasingly going to become gateways to services beyond the objects themselves.’ says Nathan Miller, Insight Curator for Crayon consumer insight agency.. ‘Having ‘smart objects’ make decisions for us could be dangerous. However, as these objects and technologies become more accessible, it’s almost certain that many of us will find ways to control our own data. The centralisation, control and freeness of our data is a choice of design rather than a requirement of technology.’"

 

via HumansInvent.com


Via ddrrnt
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Frederic Emam-Zade Gerardino from Web of Things
Scoop.it!

“Hello Avatar: Rise of the Networked Generation,” by B. Coleman

“Hello Avatar: Rise of the Networked Generation,” by B. Coleman | Singularity Scoops | Scoop.it

"In her new book, “Hello Avatar,” artist and media theorist B. Coleman looks at the same virtual terrain and sees, rather than impoverishment and imaginative constriction, increasing personal agency, and even fulfillment."

 

"Faster than we realize the physical world is coming online. “Whether it is with RFID tags or another kind of sensor,” Coleman writes, “one finds information systems that, in real-time, track objects whose presence can be read by satellite, radio or scanner.” Media theorists use the term “social objects” for these in-building climatic sensors, GPS-equipped cars and phones, and an array of other trackable consumer products, and consider them part of a burgeoning “Internet of Things” that monitors energy use and geographic locations — the objects’ own and ours as well. And here lie more dystopian possibilities: “At what point do our ‘smart’ houses, cars, and appliances begin to report on our behavior?” she asks. “The risk lies in the prospect that as the thing becomes sensible, the human subject, as a subject of a network culture, becomes more thing-like.” She believes such fates can be mitigated if designers can make media technologies that are more transparent to us than we are to them."

 

via washingtonpost.com


Via ddrrnt
more...
No comment yet.